Skip to main content

Full text of "North Carolina public school bulletin"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/northcarolinapub1967nort 



' ■ 30/I 



/> 




DUCATIONAL 
JRESS 

jSSOCI ATION 

OF 

'AMERICA 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleiqh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



A/ 



SEPTEMBER 1965 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, No. 1 




Superintendents Conference Features Reviews 
Of Far-Reaching Recent Federal Legislation 



Superintendents were challenged 
to "think anew and act anew" 
throughout the annual four-day 
conference in Mars Hill, July 27-30. 
From Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll's opening address and con- 
tinuing throughout the conference, 
emphasis was placed on the concept 
enunciated by Lincoln: "the dog- 
mas of the quiet past are inade- 
quate to the stormy present." 



Billiard Named Director 
Of Vocational Education 

Appointment of A. G. Bullard, 
State supervisor of Agricultural 
Education since 1956, as Director 
of Vocational Education, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, 
was announced by Dr. Charles F. 
Carroll on Sept. 3. 

Bullard joined the staff of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction in 1942. His assignments 
have included assistant supervisor 
of Food Production, subject mat- 
ter specialist and supervisor in 
Farmer Training, and assistant 
State supervisor of Agricultural 
Education. 

Prior to joining the State staff, 
he taught vocational agriculture 
at Bethel Hill High School in Per- 
son County and Green Hope High 
School in Wake County. 

A native of Moore County, he is 
an honor graduate of North Caro- 
lina State College, where he 
earned both the bachelor's and 
master's degrees in agricultural 
education. 

Achievements Cited 

In 1936-37, he was recognized as 
State Master Teacher. Other rec- 
ognitions he has received include 
the Distinguished Service Award 

(Continued on page 6) 



New Programs Stressed 

Highlights of the conference, in 
addition to Dr. Carroll's address, 
included a full day's presentation 
of "The Elementary and Second- 
ary Education Act of 1965" by Dr. 
Arthur L. Harris of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and 
Welfare; a symposium including 
eight superintendents on "Organ- 
izing and Administering a Deseg- 
regating School System;" and a 
second symposium built around 
the theme of "Economically Disad- 
vantaged and Educationally De- 
prived Children in North Carolina 
— Who Are They, Where Are 
They, and How Are They to Be 
Served?" 

Review of Legislation 

New laws and regulations, State 
and Federal, were reviewed by 
Controller A. C. Davis and Assist- 
ant Superintendent J. Everette 
Miller; and relationships with the 
federal government, with private 
schools, with community action 
groups, and with foundations 
were also reviewed during the 
conference. 

Entertainment for the confer- 
ence included a concert by the 
North Carolina Governor's School 
Symphony Orchestra under the 
direction of Charles DeLaney. 

Superintendent Roland Morgan, 
president of the Division of Super- 
intendents of the N. C. Education 
Association, presided over a busi- 
ness session of the superinten- 
dents. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

The State Department of Public 
Instruction is revising its mailing 
list. See back page of this issue to 
find out whether you should notify 
us if you wish to continue receiving 
this publication. 



Two New Members Appointed 
To State Board of Education 

Governor Dan K. Moore an- 
nounced on Aug. 19 the appoint- 
ment of two new members of the 
State Board of Education to re- 
place two members whose terms 
had expired. 

Garland Garriss, Troy attorney 
and former State Senator, was 
named to the District 4 seat on the 
Board, replacing Charles G. Rose, 
Jr., Fayetteville attorney, who had 
resigned prior to the expiration of 
his term (April 1). 

William R. Lybrook, Winston- 
Salem tobacco firm executive, was 
named to represent District 5, re- 
placing Charles W. McCrary, 
Asheboro textile executive, whose 
term also expired on April 1. 

Terms of both new members are 
to expire on April 1, 1973. 

Garriss, a native of Northamp- 
ton County, has been attorney for 
Montgomery County since 1946 
and has served three terms in the 
State Senate. He holds a law de- 
gree from Duke University. 

Lybrook, a Forsyth County na- 
tive, is vice president of the R. J. 
Reynolds Tobacco Co. A former 
president of the State Industrial 
Council, he is also a graduate of 
Duke University School of Law. 

The two men took part in their 
first Board meeting on -Sept. 2 
after taking the oath of office, ad- 
ministered by Chief Justice Emery 
B. Denny of the State Supreme 
Court. 

Rose and McCrary were honored 
by their fellow Board members at 
a banquet in Raleigh on June 3. 
Each was presented a silver bowl 
as a token of appreciation for his 
service. Both were appointed to 
the Board of Education by Gov. 
Luther Hodges in April 1956 and 
reappointed by him the following 
year. 



u 



Sufie^utteudent Gatooll Satfl . . . 



(Excerpts from address at Superintendents Conference, Mars Hill, July 28, 1965) 

If asked to point out the predominant emphasis or demand upon 
the educational horizon now and within the foreseeable future, I 
would answer with one six-letter word— CHANGE. The emphasis upon 
change may be couched in other words— improve, strengthen, extend, 
intensify, re-structure, or what have you— but, the message of the 
day is still CHANGE. Change in education is in demand and change 
in education is being wrought by educators and by non-educators. 
The very fact that change in education is being instigated and ad- 
ministered by non-educators is, in itself, a most significant change. . . . 

Generally speaking, one of the clearest evidences of the demand 
for educational change in this State and Nation would appear to be 
found in the relative ease with which money can be found for educa- 
tion. Next to the dollar for defense at home and abroad, and to the 
dollar with which to allay outright human hunger, the dollar for ed- 
ucation is probably most plentiful. For documentation I refer you to 
the many Acts of Congress appropriating money for educational 
innovation and change and to the many grants made by foundations, 
corporations, and individuals for experimentation, research, and 
demonstration. 

How can and shall the demanded changes in education be ef- 
fected? Shall changes come through the established patterns as we 
have known them? Not likely, by any means! We must think anew and 
act anew. 

It is already apparent that education in the future will not be en- 
trusted to professional educators alone. There are already on the 
scene those who say that education is too big and too important to 
be left solely in the hands of educators. 

Who then will organize and administer the new educational pro- 
grams? The answer is becoming increasiggly obvious: People who 
can and will organize and administer them, and the decision as to 
who can and who will is no longer made on the basis of semester 
hours or years of credit acquired through the established patterns. 
One illustration: Why are project coordinators and community action 
groups in the ascendancy and superintendents and boards of educa- 
tion being bypassed? The answer is evident: there is a feverish de- 
mand—even an impatience— for something newer, faster, and more 
effective in education. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



The . . . most important way for 
a teacher to promote inquiry is to 
create a climate of acceptance for 
ideas, theories and plans of attack 
suggested and used by children. 
Even if a teacher feels that a 
child's theory is dead wrong, it is 
far better to let the child come to 
see this for himself through his 
own searching, than to have the 
teacher tell him. ... If the teacher 
encourages a pupil to think and 
inquire autonomously, in the long 
run the structure of knowledge 
and the meaning he acquires will 
be far deeper and more functional 
than that gained through more 
prescriptive teaching. — J. Richard 
Suchman, in The Instructor, Sep- 
tember 1965 



It is the imagination and the 
basis of facts that are most im- 
portant for the purposes of teach- 
ing (history) ; the problems will, 
in a sense, take care of them- 
selves. One of the difficulties of so 
much of the current emphasis on 
analysis — we call it the 'problem' 
method — is that students are ex- 
pected to analyze a complex body 
of data and draw conclusions 
from that analysis on the basis 
of the most meager and inconclu- 
sive information. — Henry Steele 
Commager, in American Educa- 
tion, June 1965 



CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

Vol. XXX, No. 1 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
J. E. MILLER, 
V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 
September 1965 



A child who has learned a re- 
stricted language at home is likely 
to have difficulty in school, where 
an elaborated language is used 
and taught; the difficulty is likely 
to increase in the higher grades, 
unless he learns the elaborated 
language that the school expects. 

Family environments of disad- 
vantaged children further handi- 
cap the child with restricted lan- 
guage by failing to answer his 
questions, failing to bring him 
into family conversation (if there 
is any), and failing to stimulate 
him with books and playthings 
and other experiences on which 
the developing mind must feed. — 
Robert J. Havighurst, in The In- 
structor, September 1965 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



p 



9av&&tmeritl ^JUat Pay 0^ 



Capitalizing on a situation im- 
plies much that is positive and 
seems to suggest freedom for ex- 
ploring all avenues through which 
advantage or profit might accrue. 
Making the most of a situation, on 
the other hand, implies reluctant 
tolerance of that which is and 
seems to suggest few, if any, over- 
tones of optimism or challenge. 

The beginning of a new school 
year is an appropriate time for edu- 
cators to review their total educa- 
tional assets in order that future 
investments might bring the most 
satisfactory dividends. 

Circumstances involving uncer- 
tainty, delay, confusion, new levels 
of authority, and rapid change 
might bewilder and dismay those 
who fail to comprehend the total 
social, economic, and educational 
picture. The educational situation 
in North Carolina, as elsewhere in 
the Nation, if viewed negatively or 
only in part, might under such cir- 
cumstances be regarded with grave 
concern, frustration, and even 
skepticism. On the other hand, if 
the educational scene is viewed in 
toto and in perspective, a degree of 
appreciation may be had for some 
of the challenges which now con- 
front us. And, as the total educa- 
tional climate is carefully ap- 
praised, there are abundant rea- 
sons to believe that now, as never 
before, educators and other com- 
munity leaders should not only pro- 
tect our current investments but 
at the same time should explore 
other sensible educational invest- 
ments in terms of even richer divi- 
dends. 

Capitalizing on the current edu- 
cational situation in North Caro- 
lina suggests renewed and intensi- 
fied efforts primarily in those areas 
which for many years have been 
recognized as important. Continued 
progress demands this year, more 
than ever — 

• More conscious effort to know 
and to understand all students. 

• More overt effort among teach- 
ers to understand each others' 
strengths and limitations, with 
renewed emphasis on the neces- 
sity for cooperative planning. 



• Increased effort between teach- 
ers and administrators toward 
improved communication. 

• More frequent evaluation of total 
policies and procedures, lest con- 
fusion, poor practices, or misun- 
derstandings deter genuine prog- 
ress. 

• Increased effort to utilize the best 
that is known in the area of 
guidance and testing. 

• Increased determination to be 
aware of the ways in which 
learning can best take place. 

• Increased willingness to teach, 
to make assignments, and to 
evaluate progress in terms of 
student differences, while at the 
same time insisting on high stan- 
dards. 

• Increased use of library and com- 
munity resources in terms of 
personal needs and interests. 

• Wiser use of textbooks and all 
supplementary materials. 

• Increased effort to teach better 
through emphasis on cooperative 
planning: meaningful staff meet- 
ings, workshops, and in-service 
education projects. 

• Increased willingness to cling to 
that which is undeniably good 
plus an increased willingness to 
experiment with new ideas. 

In exploring all avenues for 
capitalizing on North Carolina's 
current educational situation, ad- 
ministrators, teachers, students, 
parents, and laymen have a new 
and challenging opportunity to in- 
vest their time, energy, imagina- 
tion, and creativity in the greatest 
task of the century: education of 
superior quality for all American 
youth. 



In the history of education, the 
most striking phenomenon is that 
schools of learning, which at one 
epoch are alive with the ferment 
of genius, in a succeeding genera- 
tion exhibit merely pedantry and 
routine. The reason is, they are 
overladen with inert ideas. . . . 
Every intellectual revolution 
which has ever stirred humanity 
into greatness has been a passion- 
ate protest against inert ideas. — 
Alfred North Whitehead 



Schools throughout North Caro- 
lina have opened, and nearly 
1,200,000 students and in excess 
of 48,000 teachers have begun 
their determined efforts to make 
the 1965-66 school year the most 
productive in the history of Tar 
Heel education. 

Desegregation has proceeded in 
good faith across the State as a 
result of much careful thinking 
and pre-planning specifically de- 
signed to guarantee the effective 
operation of all schools. A com- 
munity climate for continuing 
progress in education has been 
evident in all sections of the State 
as educators, school board mem- 
bers, and others have aggressively 
set their sights on goals of excel- 
lence for all students. 

As the new year gets under way, 
many classes are smaller than one 
year ago, especially in the pri- 
mary grades; special programs 
are available for all ages, for all 
levels of ability and attainment, 
and for many interests; services 
in such areas as guidance, test- 
ing, and health are more numer- 
ous and of better quality than in 
previous years; arrangements for 
the continued growth of teachers 
are more in evidence than at any 
previous time; and curriculum 
changes seem more pronounced 
than ever in the history of North 
Carolina schools. 

In spite of temporary and dis- 
turbing obstacles, the atmosphere 
in North Carolina continues to be 
conducive for educational growth 
and progress. Moments of appre- 
hension have invariably given 
way to an abiding and widespread 
faith in the belief that the schools 
of the State must increasingly 
serve the specific needs of all its 
students, no matter how perplex- 
ing the task. In such an atmos- 
phere, problems of successful de- 
segregation, the necessity for im- 
proved curricula and methodology, 
finding more effective ways of 
evaluation in terms of effective 
change, and other problems tend 
to become regarded as challenges. 
In such an atmosphere, 1965-66 
will undoubtedly be a productive 
and rewarding year. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



School Officials Find Their Summer Activities 
Stepped Up as Result of Federal Legislation 



It wasn't a very hot summer, 
and it wasn't long enough. 

Weather bureau records indi- 
cate that the summer of 1965 was 
not exceptionally hot, and for 
many school officials throughout 
the Tar Heel State, it was far 
too short. 

In addition to attending to their 
normal summer duties, superin- 
tendents and boards of education 
were devoting a considerable 
amount of time to new tasks : iron- 
ing out plans for compliance with 
Federal regulations under the 
Civil Rights Act; initiating plans 
for utilizing funds available under 
the Elementary and Secondary Ed- 
ucation Act of 1965; and working 
with community action groups and 
other organizations in planning 
and implementing numerous proj- 
ects and programs under the Eco- 
nomic Opportunity Act of 1964. 

U. S. Office of Education staff 
members were working overtime, 
too, as they reviewed the nearly 
2,500 compliance plans submitted 
by school systems across the Na- 
tion, worked out regulations pur- 
suant to provisions of the Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Education 
Act, and answered endless ques- 
tions relating to recent legisla- 
tion. 

State education officials found 
their activities stepped up con- 
siderably as they attended special 
regional conferences for briefing 
on the far-reaching new Federal 
programs, digested and corre- 
lated masses of information and 
passed the precipitate along to 
local school officials, and worked 
out plans and policies for per- 
forming new functions. 

Three-man teams from the U. S. 
Office of Education conferred in- 
dividually with city and county 
superintendents in two rounds of 
meetings at Raleigh in July, work- 
ing out the exact wording of de- 
tailed compliance plans previously 
submitted. Two of the staff mem- 
bers of the Federal agency took 
part in both sets of conferences — 
Dr. George McCowan, a former 
school superintendent in South 
Carolina, and Mordecai Johnson, 



an attorney. Two others, David 
Barrus, an attorney and Deputy 
Director of the Equal Education 
Opportunities Program, and Dr. 
Carl Ring, took part in the first 
and second series, respectively. 

They discussed 67 local plans in the 
first round of conferences and 73 dur- 
ing the second. 

Conference on Survey 

On Aug. 11, another group of U. S. 
Office of Education officials visited 
Raleigh, to explain the purposes of a 
nationwide survey to be conducted 
pursuant to provisions of the Civil 
Rights Act. This conference involved 
superintendents of 19 North Carolina 
school systems selected to take part in 
the survey. 

Dr. A. M. Mood, who heads the Edu- 
cational Statistics branch of the U. S. 
Office, explained to the group that the 
survey is designed to provide a basis 
for measuring progress in eliminating 
inequalities in education. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
stated that he did not feel that the 
schools selected for the study consti- 
tuted a true cross-section of North 
Carolina schools. Dr. Mood indicated 
that counties and localities with high 
and low percentages of minority 
groups had been purposely selected. 
He told the superintendents that the 
schools chosen will not be required to 
take part in the survey but are being 
asked to do so voluntarily. Imbal- 
ances in the samples will be weighed 
in appraising the data, and results of 
the survey will be tabulated on a re- 
gional or national basis, not identified 
by states or counties, he stated. 

The study will involve giving 
achievement and aptitude tests to pu- 
pils, having them answer questions 
relating to their personal and family 
life; having teachers fill out question- 
naires on educational opportunities, 
community attitudes, and other fac- 
tors, and providing data on school 
facilities, expenditures, pupil teacher 
ratios, and other information. Dr. 
Mood emphasized that the pupil ques- 
tionnaires will not be signed. 

Several of the superintendents pres- 
ent indicated reservations about the 
value of the survey and stated that 
they would have to confer with their 
boards of education before consenting 
to participate. 



Haywood, Canton Systems 
Consolidate as of July 1 

Merger of the Canton City and 
Haywood County school adminis- 
trative units, pursuant to provi- 
sions of legislation enacted by the 
1963 General Assembly, became ef- 
fective July 1, 1965. The new unit 
is designated officially as the Hay- 
wood County Consolidated School 
Administrative Unit. 

J. H. Melton, formerly principal 
of Josephus Daniels Junior High 
School, Raleigh, was named super- 
intendent. L. B. Leatherwood, for- 
merly superintendent of the Hay- 
wood County unit, was named 
assistant superintendent in charge 
of instruction, and C. R. Dale, for- 
merly Canton superintendent, as- 
sistant superintendent in charge 
of business affairs. 

Haywood County voters ap- 
proved the unit merger as well as 
a school bond issue of $2.4 million 
to finance a county-wide school 
consolidation program. Construc- 
tion is under way on the two con- 
solidated high school units, one 
south of Canton, and the other at 
Lake Junaluska. These schools will 
accommodate students from the 
seven present schools with high 
school grades. 



Streamlined Format Adopted 
For NCEA District Meetings 

Ten district conventions of the 
North Carolina Education Associa- 
tion, the first of which was held 
September 21 in Gastonia, will 
continue through October 22, with 
the final meeting in Elizabeth City. 

Two conventions, one each on 
Tuesday and Friday, have been 
arranged for each week, and the 
format of each program has been 
sufficiently streamlined that gen- 
eral and special area meetings are 
less crowded than heretofore. 

Theme for each conference is 
"Education Sufficient for Our 
Times." Dr. Frank Greer, presi- 
dent of the NCEA, will preside at 
each meeting. Members of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction are participating in a 
number of these meetings. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



No Appreciable Increase in New Private Schools 
Seen as Result- of Civil Rights Act Compliance 



Though there has been an in- 
crease during the spring and sum- 
mer of requests for information 
on establishing private schools, 
there is little evidence to suggest 
that an appreciable number of 
private schools will be established 
this year as a result of increasing 
desegregation of public schools. 

That is the judgment expressed 
by Calvin Criner, State Supervisor 
of Non-Public Schools, in response 
to an inquiry about the probable 
effects of local public school ad- 
justments to comply with regula- 
tions under the Civil Rights Act. 

Mostly Kindergartens 

Criner stressed the point that 
nearly all of the inquiries he has 
received, as well as requests for 
approval, relate to establishment 
of kindergartens. Increased inter- 
est in this area, he said, may be 
due to the lack of public kinder- 
gartens in North Carolina. 

He also observed that the De- 
partment does not inquire into the 
reasons which may exist for the 
establishment of any non-public 
school, sectarian or non-sectarian. 
All non-public schools must meet 
the same standards, he stated, for 
approval by the State Department 
of Public Instruction. The General 
Statutes provide that all non- 
public schools come under the su- 
pervision of the State Board of 
Education. 

Requirements Cited 

Any group planning to start a 
non-public school is required to 
notify the Department of Public 
Instruction as to when the school 
is scheduled to begin operation, 
Criner pointed out. 

To continue in operation, a 
school must meet certain stand- 
ards. It is required to furnish the 
same type of facilities, to employ 
only State-certified teachers, to 
offer substantially the same 
courses offered in public schools 
at the same grade levels, to use 
textbooks similar to those used in 
public schools, to hold classes not 
less than six hours per day for a 



180-day term, and to meet require- 
ments as to physical examinations 
of teachers, fire protection, and 
sanitation, similar to those for 
public schools. 

Dr. Carroll's Views 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
agreed with Criner's observations. 
Both emphasized that the Depart- 
ment has received little direct in- 
formation about the establishment 
of private schools for the purpose 
of accommodating pupils whose 
parents do not want them to attend 
desegregated public schools. Dr. 
Carroll reiterated the point that 
such information is neither re- 
quired nor solicited by the De- 
partment. 

Dr. Carroll remarked that at 
present, North Carolina ranks 50th 
among the states in the number of 
students enrolled in private 
schools — 1.3 percent of the total 
number of pupils in the State 
above the kindergarten level. He 
said he did not expect that this 
percentage would increase appre- 
ciably within the foreseeable fu- 
ture. 

Costly Enterprise 

One reason for this prediction, 
he said, is the cost of establishing 
and maintaining a private school 
which would provide an acceptable 
program in acceptable facilities, 
with qualified teachers. 

Another factor to be considered, 
he observed, is the fact that a non- 
public school would not be eligible 
for federal aid or to participate in 
any benefits under the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act, for 
example, if the school did not com- 
ply with regulations under the 
Civil Rights Act. 

What happens if it is deemed 
that a non-public school is not 
attempting to comply with State 
standards? Criner stated that in 
such an event, the local school su- 
perintendent is notified that stu- 
dents in that school are not com- 
plying with the State's compulsory 
attendance law; local school offi- 
cials then deal directly with the 
parents of the students, rather 
than with the school itself. 



Governor, President Hail 
College's Groundbreaking 

An address by Gov. Dan K. 
Moore and a message from Presi- 
dent Lyndon B. Johnson highlight- 
ed the groundbreaking ceremony 
for the new Southeastern Commu- 
nity College in Columbus County 
on June 29. 

Predicting "a bright future" for 
the college, Gov. Moore cited "the 
backlog of unmet educational 
needs ... in this area of North 
Carolina." He expressed confidence 
that "sound fiscal and educational 
planning" would assure that the 
college fulfilled its distinctive re- 
sponsibilities as a "comprehensive 
institution" in meeting these 
needs. 

President's Greetings 

Dr. Warren A. Land, president 
of the college, who presided at the 
ceremony, read a telegram from 
President Johnson expressing his 
wish for the college's "unlimited 
success." 

"I am both pleased and proud 
that the federal government has 
had the privilege of participating 
in the establishment of Southeast- 
ern Community College," the White 
House message stated. 

Federal funds amounting to 
more than $330,000 are included 
in the $1.5 million which will fi- 
nance construction of the first five 
buildings on the 106-acre college 
site on U. S. 74-76 between White- 
ville and Chadbourn. Pending com- 
pletion of the new facilities, the 
college is operating in the former 
Chadbourn High School building. 

Initiative Lauded 

In brief remarks, Dr. I. E. Ready, 
Director of the Department of 
Community Colleges, lauded the 
efforts of citizens of the area in 
establishing the college. Dr. Dal- 
las Herriner, Chairman of the State 
Board of Education, told the group 
that this strong local initiative 
had elicited the commitment of the 
State agencies to continuing in- 
terest and support of the new col- 
lege. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Economic Opportunity Act Sparks Many Projects, 
Educational Programs During Summer Months 



A rather bewildering array of 
programs, most of them education- 
al in nature, is being undertaken 
in North Carolina under provi- 
sions of the Economic Opportunity 
Act of 1964. 

Reports issued in June by the 
North Carolina Fund and the office 
of the State Coordinator for the 
Economic Opportunity Program 
indicate the scope and variety of 
activities under way and planned. 

N. C. Fund's Role 

The North Carolina Fund is 
providing partial financial support 
for 11 Community Action pro- 
grams and is engaged in training 
programs for VISTA volunteers, 
Community Action technicians, 
and the North Carolina Volun- 
teers. 

Some 250 college students par- 
ticipating in the N. C. Volunteers 
program moved into the field on 
June 17. Divided into 21 teams, 
they were sent into 17 project 
areas to work in a variety of areas. 

Head Start Projects 

As of June 23, the Economic 
Opportunity Program office re- 
ported, 81 Project Head Start pro- 
grams had been approved, 57 of 
them sponsored by local education- 
al agencies. A total of 26,665 pre- 
school children were enrolled in 
the programs at 827 centers, with 
2,086 professionals and more than 
5,700 volunteers involved. Total 
cost of the projects was $4,697,214 
of which $4,104,231 was provided 
from federal funds. As of June 30, 
two more Head Start programs 
had been approved. 

In another type of activity close- 
ly bearing on public school pro- 
grams, the Neighborhood Youth 
Corps, nine programs had been 
approved as of June 30. The total 
cost of the programs was listed as 
$2,699,934.90, of which $2,381,- 
998.21 was the federal share and 
$317,936.69 the local share. 

Three Job Corps Centers had 
been initiated — Arrowood in Ma- 
con County, Schenck in Transyl- 
vania County, and Ocanaluftee in 
Swain County. 



Adult Education 

Nearly 15,000 persons had en- 
rolled in Adult Basic Education 
Classes administered by the De- 
partment of Community Colleges, 
and a grant of $819,068 had been 
received to operate this program. 
North Carolina's plan for Adult 
Basic Education was the first State 
plan to be approved. 

Sixteen Community Action Pro- 
grams had been approved and a 
total of $319,734 allocated for 
these programs, of which $263,065 
was the federal share and $56,669 
the local share. 

Seventy-four VISTA volunteers 
had been assigned to a wide range 
of projects in seven areas com- 
prising at least 14 counties, most 
of them in the southeastern, north- 
eastern, and mountain regions. 
The total amount allocated for 
support of their activities was 
$109,347, of which $91,002 was the 
federal share, and $18,345 the lo- 
cal share. 

Buliard Named . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 
in Agricultural Education, Hon- 
orary American Farmer, member- 
ship on the Board of Trustees of 
the Future Farmers of America 
Foundation, and citation as "Tar 
Heel of the Week" by the Raleigh 
News and Observer in 1957. 

He is actively affiliated with nu- 
merous professional and agricul- 
tural organizations, including the 
American Vocational Association, 
the National Agricultural Teach- 
ers Association, the State Grange, 
and the Farm Bureau. 

He is a member and former pres- 
ident of the North Carolina Board 
of Farm Organization and Agri- 
cultural Agencies. Currently, he 
is secretary of the Advisory Com- 
mittee for the National Center for 
Advanced Study and Research in 
Agricultural Education and is 
working with a national committee 
studying the program of the Fu- 
ture Farmers of America. Last 
year, he was a member of the Na- 
tional Committee to revise objec- 
tives for vocational agricultural 
organization. 



Pioneer North Carolina 
Vocational Educator Dies 

Thomas E. Browne, 84, who was 
the first State Director of Voca- 
tional Education, the first profes- 
sor of education at North Carolina 
State College, and who led in 
establishing the Future Farmers 
of America program in North 
Carolina, died Aug. 27 at his home, 
The Cedars, near Murfreesboro. 

He became Director of the Divi- 
sion of Vocational Education, 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, in 1917, following pas- 
sage of the Smith-Hughes Act, 
which provided funds to the states 
for vocational education programs. 
The following year, he was named 
professor of education at N. C. 
State, and in 1925, he was appoint- 
ed head of the college's Educa- 
tion Department. He retired from 
both posts in 1946. 

A graduate of Wake Forest Col- 
lege, he held the M.S. degree from 
Columbia University. In 1948, he 
was awarded an honorary degree, 
doctor of vocational education, by 
N. C. State University. 

After several years as principa 
of Atlantic Collegiate Institute, he 
was appointed farm agent and su- 
perintendent of schools in Hert- 
ford County, serving in both posts 
simultaneously. He was named 
district farm demonstration agent 
for Eastern North Carolina in 
1911 and was put in charge of 
boys' club work over the entire 
State in 1913, then moving to 
Raleigh. 

During his tenure as Director 
of Vocational Education, vocation- 
al agriculture programs grew from 
a total enrollment of 323 in 29 
schools to 26,805 in 427 schools 
and financial returns on super- 
vised projects from $41,481 to 
more than $1.6 million; vocational 
home economics programs from 
one school and 19 evening classes 
with a total enrollment of 323 to 
413 schools and 114 evening class- 
es with a total enrollment of 28,- 
956; trade and industrial educa- 
tion from five classes with total 
enrollment of 128 to a high of 798 
classes in 1941-42 with total en- 
rollment of 14,366. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



President Appoints Educator To Top HEW Post 



John W. Gardner, for the past 
10 years president of the Carnegie 
Corporation, was appointed Secre- 
tary of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare by President Lyndon Johnson 
on Aug. 18. Gardner succeeds An- 
thony S. Celebrezze, whom John- 
son appointed to a federal judge- 
ship. 

As director of the Carnegie 
Foundation, Gardner served on the 
task force that drew up the Ele- 
mentary and Secondary Education 
Act of 1965. He directed the White 
House Conference on Education 
during the past summer and is 
currently helping shape the Presi- 
dent's forthcoming education bills. 

As head of HEW, Gardner, an 
authority on education, will over- 
see such major programs as medi- 
care, social security, and the vastly 
expanded federal aid programs in 
education. 

Advocate of Reform 

Gardner is known as an activist 
and advocate of reform in educa- 
tion. Respected by his peers as one 
of the most knowledgeable men in 
the field of education, he was re- 
sponsible for the subsidizing of 



James N. Conant's recent study, 
Slums and Suburbs. He is the au- 
thor of a number of major educa- 
tional reports, one of the best 
known being The Pursuit of Excel- 
lence. He was also active as a par- 
ticipant in the 1965 Mathematics 
Commission, which drew up reform 
recommendations years ahead of 
their time. 

In recent years Gardner has 
recommended a full secretaryship 
for education in the President's 
cabinet. Early statements from 
Gardner's office have indicated, 
however, that he will not push 
immediately for such a new posi- 
tion in the Cabinet. Early in Sep- 
tember Francis Keppel, former 
Commissioner of Education, was 
named assistant Secretary of Edu- 
cation, a promotion which some 
observers feel may be a forerun- 
ner to a full secretaryship. 

Scholar, author, administrator, 
independent thinker, and explorer 
in search of excellence, Gardner is 
eminently qualified to serve the 
Nation in a constructive and cre- 
ative manner, President Johnson 
stated, in announcing his appoint- 
ment. 



Chavis, Emmerling Join CSIP As Assistant Directors 



K. Z. Chavis and Dr. Frank C. 
Emmerling joined the staff of the 
Comprehensive School Improve- 
ment Program as assistant direc- 
tors during the summer months, 
Chavis in June and Emmerling in 
August. 

They will assist Dr. Woodrow 
Sugg in coordinating the 194 Com- 
prehensive School Improvement 
projects throughout the State. 

Prior to joining the CSIP staff, 
Chavis was an elementary princi- 
pal at the South Nash School, 
where he had served since 1956. 
Active in community and profes- 
sional organizations, Chavis joined 
the Project well prepared to assist 
in the implementation of its major 
objectives. He earned his B.S. de- 
gree from Langston University in 
Oklahoma and his M.A. degree 
from North Carolina College in 
Durham. He has done additional 



study at Oklahoma State College, 
Tuskeegee Institute, and the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. 

Chavis is married to the former 
Florence Geneva Boone of Wood- 
land and they have four children. 

Prior to joining the Department 
of Public Instruction, Dr. Emmer- 
ling was head of the education 
and psychology department at 
Berry College in Mount Berry, 
Georgia. Previously he had been 
director of the Peabody Labora- 
tory School at the Woman's College 
of Georgia in Milledgeville. 

Emmerling was a Ford Founda- 
tion Fellow at Auburn University, 
where he earned his D.Ed, degree. 
His M.A. is from Stetson Univer- 
sity and his B.A., from San Jose 
State College. 

Dr. Emmerling is married to the 
former Hazel May of Gastonia. 
They have one son. 



Shakespeare Drama Project 
To Continue, Governor Says 

The Shakespeare Project, which 
over the past three years brought 
live professional performances of 
scenes from the Bard's dramatic 
works to thousands of high school 
students, will go ahead again this 
year, thanks to arrangements 
worked out with six North Caro- 
lina banks to finance the project. 

Funds requested for the project 
—$52,000 for the 1965-67 biennium 
— were deleted by the Joint Appro- 
priations Subcommittee during the 
1965 General Assembly session. 

In announcing the banks' agree- 
ment to provide the funds for 
1965-66, Gov. Dan K. Moore cred- 
ited State Treasurer Edwin Gill 
with assistance in reviving the 
program. 

Merit and Popularity 

Citing the "merit and popular- 
ity" of the Shakespeare Project, 
Gov. Moore stated that he was 
pleased that "through private con- 
tributions it will be continued for 
another year." 

The project is operated under a 
contractual agreement between the 
State Board of Education and 
Theatre-In-Education, Inc., a pro- 
fessional drama group of New 
York City under the direction of 
Miss Lyn Ely. 

Last year, the troupe presented 
selections from "Twelfth Night" 
and "Julius Caesar" in perform- 
ances before 50,000 students in 60 
schools. 

Cooperating in financing the 
project this year are the State's 
six largest banks: Wachovia Bank 
and Trust Co., North Carolina Na- 
tional Bank, First-Citizens Bank 
and Trust Co., Northwestern Bank, 
First Union National Bank, and 
Branch Banking and Trust Co. 

Board Honors Educator 

The Farmville Elementary 
School has been renamed the Sam 
D. Bundy School in honor of the 
veteran educator who has served 
as Farmville principal since 1947. 

The name change, recommended 
in a resolution adopted by the 
Farmville School Committee, was 
approved by the Pitt County Board 
of Education in July. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



J? 



CJ 
I/) 

£ 
o 

So 

a. 



■is 

>> o 
3 £> 

o3 o3 

rQ CD 
4* "SI 



as 



SO 



^ i 

1/1 




Q 

C 
CJ 



2^3 



+-> O 

« CD 

co w 

PJ 3 

.2 n 

+3 o 



II 

S-s 

M c 

— c3 
be 

O 



© 
© 

u 



bo 3 

3 O 

'43 HP 

cS o3 

1— 1 N 

O) .rt 

Sh 3 

o3 

CO t)0 

CD Sh 

bo O 
3 
«3 , 

■ss 

u 
O 2 
CD 

p3 — 

co 



73 

o 

o 



*> 

CD 
Sh 



ai 

co > 

CJ CO 

73 3 

.jH (J) 

> HP 



X a3 
O) ,3 

cs en 

o pI 

■»■* a) cr 1 

© -2 s 

Sh o 

3 CD 42 

co 

LU 

u 

3 

.£ 

M 

£ 
CJ 

o 

fa 

a. 
J 

U 

9 

IS 
E 

en 

(0 



3 73 
• rt 3 
_, o3 
73 

CD 
73 co 



»K 



-3 3 ^3 3 

-^ ,0 +> o3 



3 cd +J 

« r3 .2 

. -^ c 

id 3 » 
o cj 

- -° -3 

co cS -u 
^p co O 
» £ 3 

> 3 g 

CO ,3 HP 

cj 
3 3 
'•" CD 3 

I -^ 3 
3 „ o3 

1 •» 
mo* 
u cj « 
£53 £ 
MO 



03 3 co 



03 



3 
O "« 

-a * 
■g'S 

.3 to 
73 

P 03 

O O 

:=: rQ 
* >, 

"Si 

CO o 

cj 

'03 , 

ft 2 

.-, a 1 
Ph cd 

ft 1h 



S' S 
T3 — .2 

S O+J 
k. O 3 
^"^5 73 



o 

CO cu 

a) -t- 3 

§2 



?-i 5h a> 
o o ,43 

<U " 3 

<u 3 .5 

So'? 



co 3 
aS co 



§1 



OCU 

. o3 -u 
3 !h O 

o+ ) « 

•h 9 h 



•Okfl 



tfi 





H3 


ft 


a> 


« 


^ 






o . 

O +3 

* '3 

CO 3 
;_, CD 
O > 

-4-J 

© £ 

2 -^ 

^3 CO 

co _S 

>» S 

3 T3 
03 03 



S 
.2 

'-+2 

-5 
'So 

CD 



cy 




ft 3 

03 

CD -tJ 

£2 CO 

to <-■ 






'Ph 



T3 «H 

CD O 

T3 

3 +s 

2 s 

S3 
CD 



•° 3 

T3.2 
CD +J 
> 03 
O CD 
Si 3 
ft73 
ftM 
03 w 



C 3 

T3 03 

cd a> 

OS >s 

t-i 3 

2 S 
ft 

CD S 



O cc 



CD 

« g 

1-! 73 



rt O 



02 



03 

3 -m 
bO 03 
<" "^ 



03 
73 

3 

fH CD 

+-> -I- 3 

co o3 

3 +* 

in CO 



CD <3 

co O 



O CD 

5 >» 

CD T3 
> CD 

2 fi 

03 CD 
73 
73 

3 co 
03 03 

CD H 

>.2 
o +^ 

03 
CO u 
bo CD 
3 n 



CO o 
O 

CD ► 
73 

.3 © 
-3 o 

"^ «H 

2 t, 

CD H 

— CD 

73 +J 
CD CD 
U ,3 

B CD 

73 Sh 
CD CD 

CO CO 

3 

boB 

.5 
'3 73 

rQ O 

„ o 

CD *H 

3 "H 

+J O 



CD 73 

.2 c 

?h 03 
ft 

73 CO 
CD ^3 

3 & 

^ ft 
CD M 

Jh 3 CO 

bo p. 

03 J: 

a> « 3 

.ft- p. 

m O CD 

1^5 

> to ° 

O CD 

S^ 3 
ft o H 

3 U 

O 3 O 

-^ 1— ( ^M 



73 
CU 

IS 

"3 



si 

c3t3 



c^^ 

cu 



u 

o 

CD £h 



ft 
ft 

s'Sl 

CD o3 j3 



co co ,£? 

O Sh -i-j 

ft CD c 

r3 CD 

■P O 3 

" o3 rj. 

CD <g CD 

s » g 



73 ,0 



«H 


; — | 


C 




73 


V 


U 




a 


co 





Sh 


pq 


CD 
ri 



> g 

£ a 

03 CD 

h 3 








"^3 


+J 


73 






CD 


c 


73 


CS3 


>. 


CD 


3 


73 


73 


03 


3 


"> 




03 


C 


ft 




m 


CO 


3 


& 


c 


CD 




-3 


^h 


CJ 




73 



^1H U 



Oi . .3 

o ° » 

oi ft 3 

<3i 3 bO 

^ g CD 

•H © 

O ^ Jh 

3 i—c 73 

O rO 3 



^3 
CD O 

03 CD 
+* -P 

CO 

CD CD 

^ s 

_jj CD 

-3 
73 

CD 



c S - 

jU 

03 o 

03 
-2 IS 



73 73 

3 3 
03 3 

O 

""'S co" 
03 g ft 

ft ,3 .2 
co 73 
O CD 3 
,3 Sh o3 
o3 ,3 



5 A -S S5 



3 
O 

ft +3 

o a 
73 cj 

03 3 



*^ CD 

73 -^> 
CD 

3 •- 
bo co 



03 o Sh 

*h _B O 
CD "2 

3 P co 

CD CO 

bo CO CD 

fl ft o 



CO 4-J CD 

O -3 3 
3 ? 73 



73 

© 

CD 
CD 

c 

+H 

ft 

CD 

<r> 

<5 



1 co ' 

ft CD CD 

oj co 3 

03 £ 

CO CD -t^ 

03 Jh 2 

^ 3 



3 '3 



ft5 



CD 



W 
W 

"H _ 

hS ° 



s "cS 



3 

o 
>> s 

o3 73 

3 



co 



r/j 



o3 
3^-2 

3 H-> 

2 r^ CD 

r3 73 3 

■P (1) " 



bo o 
03 2 

CD 4-? 

,3 3 

^ § 

3 d 

§.2 
co ^3 



, ~ l CD 

s § 

03 « 
3 ^ 

bo 



3 

u « 

03 

„ O 



3 °2 
.« o3 

a ■a 

•3 03 



CD Sh 

^ ft 
CD 

^ i-H 
&9- 



p 03 



Sh CD 



CD 03 
Sh 



so ^ 



73 CD Sh > 

73 o3 +-■ CD 

hh> «H 3 
>>CO o3 

^h 73 

■B -73 3 

S 3 cd 03 

CO O CD 



w co 

Sh 3 
ft" rt 

° Sh 

p-«2 



ftm 

rt o 

03 

3 3 
o o 



3 

CD 
CJ 

Sh 
CD 
ft 

CD 

> 



co jj 
CD 5 

,.S 73 

CD 3 
CD CD 
CD -^ 

u .s 

r^ cd 

_3 ^ g< 



CO 



o3 
-xi< CD 



.S h2 .£■ 

*Sh 

^S CD 

03 ,3 



CD 

CJ CO 

3 03 

.r-, CD 

Sh U 
ft CD 



CD -rn 
ft 

3 3 

co 03 

, T3 

■tt CD 

Sh +J 

o3 3 

.2 2 

co bo 



3 CO 
03 

•S Sh 

"^ o 

CD =n 

Sh 

O _H 

§ CD 
HP 

CO I-H 

CD 03 
C£> 



Sh 1 CD 

03 3 o 

CD _CD 3 

>>t: o3 

.5 73 

■% Sh 3 
O CD CD 

03 & hp 

o H P 

+3 3 * 

3 

CD 



co 3 .' 

CO 
CO 



5 ,3 



o S 

3 ° 



3 a 
2 S 



i.252 

CD -Q O 

3 

3 2 - 

O r3 CO 

CO HP -p 
Sh S 

CD IH CD 
ft O 73 



* S 3 o 
-^ g O 

d J2 s^ ^ 
•C "ft* 

CD CO ^ 

o?oo 

CJ H<H 

§!* 

r3 ^ 
2 ^^ 

- 3 ^ 

S I.. 

O O '• 

" Sh CO 



Sh M 

CD ft Sh 

CO ^ O 

3 co".-S 

3 hp 3 

O 3 oj 

O 03 -r-j 



Sh 

o3 

CD 
>> 

<" . 

£ .2 
's 

CD 03 

co j* 

o3 CD 

CD ^ 

3 S 



DQ 

■g. 

© CO 

W 73 

ceo 
■p 

c >> 

CD Sh 

s« 

a* 
ft £ 

S 0) 

Sh O 



O CD 

Sh TT; 
ft <° 



«H Sh ■ 

$ 5 

3 w 

s to 3 



!> o3 

O Sh 
3 CD 



><; «h 03 

11 CD TT! 

. HP O W 

g" CD 

c«3 S3 

-IP HP O HP 



CD t> 



£ .« 



73 

CD 3 

CD 03 



gft°-s 

3 3 be 8 
co ft 3 pO 



Sh 73 

o3 CD 

CD HP 

Sh 

ft 



Sh CD 
03 ft 



X 



3 CM 3 
2 89-3 
g w cd 



3^ 
cr. 1 



a 



73 

Sh "^ 

CD 

3 

CD -rj 

OpO 

3 

IO rv 

co ^h 

I-H >> 
DO 



CO 

bo 3 

* .2 

HP 

co 03 

Sh T 1 

r2 P. 
ft 

a 



co 



03 r" 



cj 2 ^ 
2 * cj 
^ 73 



3 03 CD CJ 



VH 

CO o 



O 



Ph 



r ' *H 



CD 
.3 



3 a> § 

o 3 .3 

c .2 OT 

73 CD CD 

<V h 3 



CO rn 

,2 3 

Sh 73 

o3 3 
J3 CD 

°.s 

. Sh 
Sh CD 

Q a 
3 
co 



> © 

o 

*h Sh 

ft 3 

^3 

03 s 

p3 3 

*» 3 
73 

CD 03 



o3 > 

Sh > 

bo 03 
O ■- ' 
Sh r> 
ft P 



2* . 

g "g 3 

P 'H CD 

Sh 

CJ 03 

CD Sh 

CJ CD 73 

s *£ 

03 -r-c 

3 CD .5 
Sh (H 

te+3 co 
p^ 

CJ 



CO 



CD 



Sh 

o 

pa 5 " 

o 

CD 

o 2 

•43 e 



g CD 



bO 03 5 

.S 3 

p3 73' ° 

O 0) K. 

03 HP p 

CD CJ CD 

Sh 03 «H 



V 
bO 
73 
3 

pq 

73 

Sh 

e 

CJ 
CD 

PS 



8 2 

03 3 
pO 
73 
CD 
> CD 

2"^ 

g£ 

03 

2 .2 
CD ^ 

j* 3 

03 P3 



03 1 
-~ O] 

CD & ^' 

p3 

H 73 
Sh 
O 



HP <J 
CD 

3p3 

03 HP 
HP >> 

p2 

CD 73 
Sh CD 
O 73 

3 



CD 



O I HP CD 

HH "3 3 Sh 

^ S 2 2 

3 £ Sh m 

-. ? CS CD 

ft R ft — 

3 cd ctf 

S "^ 

«H 3 jg 3 

°^.2 



CD 



CD 03 
p3 

HP CD 

^3 



3 ■ 

o 
'> 

CD 



3 3 hp 

O 2 « 

•P. ° bo 

- u« 

■S 2 3 
S >> 

€«■ 03 > 



co co cO cj 
3 3 a 

o o 



o3 f3 

• i-H Sh 
Sh CD 
ft & 
O O 
Sh 
ft ■— ' 

l § 

<< p3 
o 

CO 



CD 
-3 



co 



Sh 

O ~"~ 

*" be 

B S 

.2t3 

jg 3 

'3 cj 
3 



CO 



2 * 

p3 o 

HP <M 

u 

O CD 

MH CO 

o3 

-2 S 



73 

3 cj 

03 3 

p3 

cd Ph 

bo 



3 3 
03 3 

-3 'S 

HP 3 



03 .g 
Sh 

Sh *h 
ft ,2 

ft c8 

03 CO 



3 3 

£ 1 . 

cj en ft 

m S P3 
« rH HP 
B » Sh 

HP Sh m 
03 CD 

HP CD Jh 
CJ 3 3 
CD hJ 

■1-5 CO .P. 

pO •-< 73 
3 



^ c ; 

CJ Hr 
HP 

SI! 

£ , 
p. i\ 

ft s, 

03 c , 



M j3 

CO f-H 

CD 

CJ ' 

^?^ 
O o 



3 

> .2 

ft"< o S 



.2 ; 

p3 ' = 

Oc,J 

cj'J 

6 !f 



8 



5« 



■■- 3 



- 13 

: - 1 



cp 



O (h 



re 



•H h+> (J 

re -p 

O CJ CO 

■rt Jh 

■g co 

w cd S 

re «"g 

w <o 2 rt 

°1f & 

^ & MT3 
« 3 « S 

•g -P O r* 
g WO 

S rH rH > 

g i t* g 

,£1 6X1 -P Xi 
©•5 g CD 

> J5 .£ > 

cj O 3 S 
rfi > c^rC 



3 Jh 
73 O 
C & 



.5 a 

s* S3 

ft^ 
3 ° 

aj to 



rO 

03 73 



TO -P W 



3 ■£ 

ft ™ 



GO 



2<£^£ 



o -a 



1=3 « 

4j CI 
IjS-rC 

re o to 

r C <P 

S ^ -p 

re fi in 

X_J jn> cp 



O 



,2 c 

o3 re 
P. 
& - 

- cp 

I- 
re i 

.fi 



rC CP 



Z^V 



C o 



re 

cp cu 
be H 



O "re 

-p 

re 03 

; fi 

° S 
Jh re 

\J o 



CD 

ss -3 

0> 

Sfi (3 

o — " 

O CD 

+2 

c3 re 
C ft 

'75 '.2 

re b 

£5 

a> 
■p -a 



o fi rfi ^ 

•h a) +3 . 

O Sh rC fn 

+3 o> — 

u P^ fi 

fi P jg o 

H » o 

■P 5" e: 

to -p O H 

•-» re re 4-> 

„, -p re 

3 re ft, 



; .&W 



bo 



,2 ^ 

<D O 
«H £ 
03 g 



.S re 

a; 

re o 



C Sh u 

° fi-a !3 

e _2 fi o 

I | rt w 

K h b « 

W QJ 4-= -P lO 
p p, fi 03 CD 



3 CD 



cr- 



*H Ch S-DCfi h 



to a) 

03 co 

te ^ 
f* o 

o& 

C o 
o o 

o 
a) to 

>J 

fi 

re 



- 6X1 
So 



5 ^ 

* In 



03 H3 

E/3 ^ 



I -SB 

« &'■& 
C fi 



^ fi ft" 



HI 



<v o 

2 * 

t; co 



r^ > 



§•3 3 



fi fi X fi O -^ C 
O 03 -u I— I 



re o 



^ «h "te 

u o ? 

0) o 
o o 

4j re a) 

Jh CO +J 

cr 2 a) 

H CO ° 

. 3 g 

fi .2 
ft +i 



bo's 
O c a> 

a .5 t3 

S S 2 

3 fi re 

Ph 'Si) a> 
re 



a> 
o 

(D 

C -^ 

0! 

r a o 

c -Js 

0) 

fi o 



& ^° 
C o 

2 * 

CO 



O tfi r: <2 

_ fi |H IJ 

T3 Cp O 



p^ 3 

rz r i 



m 



re C a; 

-£ -S ^3 
02 to +3 



S -fi 



_ o 
53 X 



S£ 



?H cU 



ft 

0) >, 



2 H o u «.-, ^ 



^ s 

-M ft 



CP C 
H re 



4J fi 

■rt o 



CO O 

cp re 

c c 

cp o 

bx> o 
re 

cp ^ 

03 

00 



cfi 



cp u 
+j ft +3 
re co o3 
fi u 



S3 cp 

.« o 

g fi 

** re 

-^^ • 

° 3 fi 

re << fi 

Jh cp 

° c 

re o 5 



3 43 
T3 C 



. fi 
_fi CP 
'fi 

re o 
CP «h 
M 

cp re 

rfi S 
4J .fi 

■•« 2 






re 


■~T3 


> 

Cu 


CO r -, 

cp W 






C 




re 


+3 ^3 




y h 


w 


re o3 


s 

re 

bx 


O 
$ cp 

g f? 


o 



s w 



ft £ w 



8 g. s 
c ° 3 
* * 8 

o ^ 

+* m 

OJ Z fi 



En 



re 



T3 cp 
H 

03 o 

O 4^ 

W - 

^-i CP 



+3 O 

O h !h 

03 re cp 

f & 

ore 

fi S5 +J 

re ?, 



>i CO 



CP 



-j§ 

S cu 






+-> 
fi 

CP 

S ^ 
ft£ 

O pj 

'cu cp 

> O 
<p 

o-S 

,fi a 

re > 

«H ? 

oQ 

C 13 

.2 fi 

4J 03 






J. ( 



H 
§ 

3 



CO ^3 

si 

4> to 



^3 3 



.S O 

fi 



cS 
3 O 

CS 



'S 2 



: <3 



bo co 

S o 

5 cs 

CP >H 

'? ° 

s q 

rS HP 

CQ .r4 



22 o fi q3 

fi H-J >IH J3 

° _ fi 

73 C o3 O 



fi ... _ 

3 m m 



h ® -P -2 12 



_ T5 fi fi 

S « s 3 

03 P,«fH «(H 



o 


c 


s 


o 


a 




CU 


O 


CJ 


'q 




s 


CP 


-M 


•r-a 


Jl) 


* 


cfi 


O 


re 
u 


cp 


CO 


o 


H-> 

c 




o 


o 


a 


""^ 


o 


3 


^3 

CJ 


c 
o 


CP 


73 




rfi 


c 


•+-> 


C 
re 


i 


>, 


73 


fi 
CP 




c 


U 


fi 




^2." 

-*-> 


O o3 
fi 'O 


re 


o 

HP 


0) 




fi 

o 
u 


DO 


73 

c 

re 


H-> 

o3 


& 


CO 


o 


^ 


CD 


w 


73 


bo 


C 


ft 


+3 


C 


>> 


o 


O 

o 

CJ 


o 

cu 

o 


re 


fi 


03 


O 




re 


I 


o 
ft 



73 cp 

^ rfi 

5 o 

fi «M 
O 

" C 
^h.2 

CU +J 

-^ O 

O ^ 

rfi CP 

4J 

'> *H 
> O 

s ° 

cp ^2 
03 cj 



ca 

7S 

a 

g 



73 



s » 



4^ 



o5-° 

fi s 

ft Si 



CO 









ca 

-a s 



03 



Jh CD 
CD & 
.fi H^ 



W O 



CP 
rfi 



c 

03 FQ 
CD 

O 03 

fi 

fi bo 

.8*3 

4J CD 

re 73 



6 mS 

ft o t 1 

40 X " 

73 CD S 
CD HJ 



fi E 

fi re 
73 

fi CJ 
fi CD 



^CD 



CO 

JS cS 
e ►§ 

^- CO 

CD -ro 
7= CS 



3 

73 *■*> 

n CJ 

CD 

O c3 

'S « 

PQ c72 



3 3 

03 o 

m 

to CD 

c« u 



fifc 



03 O 



Jfi fi +3 

CD O 



1 2 S3 

C^ o 

o S c 

bo > 03 



^ cp 



73 H fi 
CD " O 

55 cd '43 
S .fi re 
o^2 

b h 73 

3 CD ^2 
ft73 W 



<u .£ 



03 o 
> O 



*• C8 

*h Srt 

o H R 

ci^ CD O 

,fi CJ 

- o <JJ 

CO 03 03 

CO CD 

CD H-J T3 

*h C 

C ^ * 

§ >» 
Jh 

aS 

CD 3 

coS a 

03 CJ CD 



Q 

^4 

o 



VI 

-a 

cub 

S3 

*» "S 
K^ 

c a 
ffl © 

1* 



re 



«,. 



CD CO 

Jh 

Jh 
O 



3 



■a js bo 

co C ^ 
•3 >,- 



co co 
fi 73 
O 3 

'■& £ 

a «*h 



Jh CO 
73 

^ 9 

^^ 

^ co 

CD _CD 
fi '2 

. Pi 

Jh cP 

£ re 
o 

fi CD 

<:^ 

HP 

02 



O Sh 3 
HP 73 O 

co > 

fi «H 73 

O O <h 



CP 



+3 co .2 



CO 

ft *R 

73 07+"" 
Jh C 

O <u re 
g^3 
fi 0.2 

7J 4J -P 



ft re 

ft HJ 

03 CO 

fi 

1— ( o 

rrt ^ 

Jh 
.-, O 



CO CD ' 

3-P 3 
™ co 
Jh 3 

bO O >, 

g & c 

ft = re 

1) c3 

3 §.S 

5ft-- 

* S 2 

cj J? 
^3^3 



1 ' ji -p 

2 3 ° S 



ft CO 



3 2 

O rfi 



o 
5 S 

<D o3 



« 3 

.S 3 O 



,S co 

2 3 

CD 



H CO 

55 



3 Jh o 

ft o • 



o 
CJ M 

73 
-P fi 

CD re 



^3"H 
03 O 

O r; c3 

<4H 77 -P 

Z P CO 



c^3 03 

"3 s 

fi Jh 
3*2 

" 3 

« .5 



S3 



fi 73 

re 3 



si 

ft CD 
CD ~Fj 

43 *" 

-P 

CO 
<H 3 

° I 

" CO Jh 

CD bo 

CO O 



O Jh 
ft ft 



HCJ ( 


-Sfl! 
'•-■ 

'OS* 



- si 
:«^ 

- . ll 

- s : 

-:- 

■■ . 

ft BH- 

:i C 



Jh 
CD 
> 

Jh 
73 



■C Sh 



4)# 

3 2 

o © 

CJ-J3 
CM 
'If 

SM 
73 u 

wa 

CU S3 



3 

c3 
CD 
Jh 

«H 

O 

-M 

cj 
CP 

5t3 

CD 
CD 

r3 

HP 

rfi 

73 
CD 



CD Jh 

rfi .O 

fi >» 

CD **H 

CD '— 

HP Eh 

CD CJ 1 
O 

CO -p 

fi . 

o 00 

CO rH 

Jh 

CD -3 

» fi 

_l « 

73 «o 



§ 2 

03 -m 
«H 03 



o3 «H 
co o 



* a .a 

n -j 



.2 -2 



03 'HH 
rfi O 

to 
bo <" 

rH re 



*H JS 

2 & 
g 2 

Jh q 

CD 3 
ft 

O >> 

<H *H 

fi o 

03 +- 



J^ CD , 

5 73 ■ 
ft > , 

O o 

Jh 
J, ft 

43 co 

fir2 
' _CJ 

C rfi 

O CD 

•43 > 

CJ 

3 Jh • 

Jh O ■ 

+J -P 

CO O 

fi FJ 



03 
Jh 

bo 

O 

o 
S'S 

co 



CD CO 
fi 






73 <m hP -fi 



C 
03 

bo g 
3 .fn 



03 o 
ft — 

rQ 

CO 3 

03 ft 



HP Sh o 



O Jh 

CJ CD 

bO^ 

2 s 

|s 73 

03 o 

Jh +J 
-P 

Jh ° 

.5 re 

*h r^ 

73 o3 

_ > 

O c3 

o 

rfi *) 

CJ 73 

co 03 

rfi 2 

.r^CD 

rfi rQ 



CO r-H 

Jh 03 

03 a 

^^ 

00S 

-- 1 fi 
CD 

o S 

HP W 

73 
2^ 



i CJ •— 1 
CD .fi. O 

O 1 ft co 
CD 1 1 

o ? 



CD 



re ._ "J 

Pi *° £ 

O co 

> 03 ft 

*h „ CD 

ft F 3 ra 

<4H CD -g 

o >> p 



fi 

H C fi 

"■ 73 rt 



4j H tO 

CD s 



fi 

,3 CD 

73 



fi 

O tn3 

. rH h_h CJ 

P fl O 

« S -fi 

2 3 ° 

cfi fi co 



CD O cj 
CO 3 

'h -P en 
3 fl m 
O CD . 

w 2 c3 

HP rfl 

bo fn +3 

fi 5 ° 
•S ft 

C CD __ 

•S n ^ 

03 Q fi 

Jh 03 
-P CD 

rfi ^ 

s_ -p to 

CD iJ 

.-h^.2 

^ rfi 

P 73 03 
CD >■ 
. HP 

co « . 

rfi 3 S 

- 73 r 

^ Pi o 



>, CD 

1 — 1 Jh 

g * 

.2 & 

> 3 

CD O 



CP 

bo 

TO 

; -^. " "~ 3 .2 

O rfi 

O -p 



M «H 
i. l> O 
. ifl!> 
.- c;D co 
»> «> 

C- -H 

; a 3 
■;*P +3 

' ;m -h 

-IS 73 
" U C 
CD 

ft 

CD 

s 

3 



O Jh O] ' 

a o m< a 

ftC 

Jh 3 6©- 

O — 

c c 



CP 



• 2r6 



co ^3 

CO X2 
3 
73 &H 
fi «j_j 



re 



H,!i 



K 13 



ag £ 



£ fi 

xo 

-3 CO 
3 (3- 



—. in 

C 60- 

&> a 

Ml 03 
^^ CD 

fi c 
re 
-fi co" 

£ § 
o-fi 



" J rH 

CD C 
bo J3 

r2 2 
" -P 

CJ 03 

ft 

>> <13 

.■so 



S E 



03 
CO 
O 
ft 
© 

u 

OS 

s 
s 

Jh 

CD 

r> 

O 

O 



2 fe »h 

O O HP 

CJ «M CO 



~ CD 
r2g 

m 

ao 

© 2 

Jh rfi 

ft <-> 

co 

c 
>.2 

0) r^ 
CO rQ 

HP 

*%£ 

g bo 

•S 3 

fa -"H 
^H HP 

03 



Jh 

CD 
CD cO 4P 



° fi re 

^-2 



»=H CD 



3 

CD * 

bo 

S 73" 

1/3 CD 

co fi 

2 ft 
2 o 

73 
5? CD 

-o bo >, 

73^r= 

CD g 03 

CO -P 

CD fl 

Jh CO 03 

W+ 1 "3 -p 

r-J CO rfl CO 



■§1 
si 

Is 

03 oj 

Jh «rH 
03 W 

re 
P >. 

r2^ 

re hp 

CO 03 

ft^ 

o 2 

ft Jh 
03 3 

rfi^ 
"^ rH 
<H O 
O SH 



2.2 

bo 3 
o ft 

Jh 
ft 03 

HP 73 

03 

3 -^ 

.a a 

O 
C 73 
O c3 



CD 73 
Jh CD 
O -P 

So3 
13 
03 ^ 
-3 fl 

HH HP 

O c3 
to 

_CU CD 

"5 - , 
03 IO 
Jh CT> 
CI 
03 rH 



K 1 

"3 Jh 2 

fi .S CO 

.2 73 rfi 

03 HH — H 

73 O rfl 



CD CJ 
Jh Cfl 
CD -g 

.3° 

CO 



tO 03 
03 Jh 
Jh 03 

03 3 

ro 2 

CD fl 

S 03 
> 

■ O 

r2 O 

§ 03 

rfl -3 

o "^ 
co >, 

rO 

° r_, 

•rH -3 

rOr2 

C< 73 

ft Pi 

<-h CD 
03 P 

rfi g 

-P O 

CJ 

O 03 

■^ Jh 



i 2 

Jh 3 
ft"H 

o 2 

Jh fl 
ft 03 

CO rfl CD 

X "P HP 

to . O 

•3 Sh 3 

Jh O ^ 

^^ 03 

* 03.2 

1,3 Jh > 

-Q73 2 

CD •« O 

HP O _ 

re S 

.2 2 S 

3.2 3 

.2 43 3 



I I I CD 

03 g g 5 

^^(M 3 



O f 1 

4P -H 



O 
03 O 

2-3 
C cj 
o3 to 

cg-fi 



03 

Jh &9- Jh 
£3- 
^ ^-3 

03 

Jh 

CD Jh 

Jh CD 

O SH 



03 rQ r3 
rfl HP 



3 
.. 03 

2£ 



ft bo ft 



bo o3 



rfl 
03 
rfl 73 

CD 

O 73 

^g 
ft 



73 
03 
73 .3 

73 rfi 

re hp 

Jh 
CO o 
"H HH 

CO 3 

rfi -2 

. o 
73 O 
fi H 

3 03 

I-H HP 

c 
>. fi 

g s 

P 5H 

rfi & 



ft C 



ft 
ft 



'- , fl 

69- o 



co 



p CD 

-H Jh 

r« 2 • 

73 — ' jj; 

<" .2 c5 

K^ *-H 03 

.2 rfi -P 

Jh 03 . 

03 > >> 

-° jh S 

c^hSS 

§ O 03 



r^ ffi HP ft 2 2 



43 
'> "ffl 

r- C3 

03 ro 

S © 
S3 

rS - 

O -3 



43 



* 



CQ cu 

r5 ^ 

•H £ 

°p3 

S3H 

.s*» 

HP tfi 

«-) Jh 

rgfe 
^5 



o S 5 

-H .5 
ftrfl 

c^ o3 
co fi 

03 

Pr- 

3 rf 
3 3 

.2 § 



S 2 

-h 73 

T-H Jh 
60- O 

rH? 

"rH 73 

03 CD 
CD HP 

rH-2 

Jh 

ft 



>>rfl 

Xl bo 

3 

CD o 

.2 'h 

'to -fi 

CO 03 

to 3 

03 o 

7j co 

03 

03 -3 

2 re 

3 Jh 

73 bo 



13 

Jh 

O CO 

«P r— 

to 'ft 

3 5 

O ft 

+3 03 

rn CD 

CO Ih 

° r3 

ft+3 



fi >> 
"* 3 

N S 

C- CD 

■"* CO 

rH^rH 

re 03 

03 JH 

Pa CD 
S3 

CO fi 

2 o 

HP 

CP 

t- EH 

^f 1 



rt 73 

bo£ 
_fl 

ft a> 

o fl 
73-4-3 

03 O 
CD 

>>-rH 
rQ 73 



.3 C 

rfi O 

73 H 
CP O 



CD •t-' 
CO CO 
CD H 

rfi « 
HP 

a) 

rfi 



^ © 



CO ^3 



CX3 O 

O Jh 

00 ft 
60- 

c 

HH '^ 

O CD 
CO 

fl 3 

O Jh 
HP° 

re ^ 

'rH "3 

ft o 3 

Jh -h 
ft 2 

& 2 

03 Jh 

03 

- 03 



03 
CJ 

'j4 
ft 



73 ^2 

CD -rH 

Jh ft 

re >> 

cu 'a 

CD 03 

% 2 

bO Jh 

fl .?. 



1g 

03 ft 



3 

bo 2 

fl HP 

'io ro 

'rH 3 

O 73 

rfi 03 



SH 

O 

to 



£"2 

4P 03 

03 O 
HP ,£! 

CO 

03 _£? 

O 

CJ 



o3 ft 

"rH ^ 
ft 
grg 

ft fi 

ft 3 
<^^ 

HP 

CD 3 

rfi rfi 



73 73 
03 CD 
>> fi 

o bo 

ft 'to 

Seo 



b- 

to 

03 1 

CD C£> 

Jh CO 

rfi OS 



03 

CO rQ 

Jh 

03 

.3 m 

h -1 73 

W 3 

re fi 



3 co 
3 CD 

re .a 

fc 3 

to 3 1 

03 03 

73 Jh 
03 

Jh HP 

bo « 

03 

03 a 

rS-2 



O 3 
3 bO 
- CD 

CD W 
to « 

o - . 
a 03 
j7 to 

^JH 
.2^ 

rfl HP 
4P O 

Jh O 

O -P 

SH 

73 
73 cp 
03 HP 

.2 I 

o 

Jh 03 
ftrQ 



73 fl 

CD O 

4P .rH 

O re 

73 2 

«.§ 

4-3 HH 

c o 

03 

3 73 

3" a 

CD 03 
to O 

rQ pq 

CO 03 
HP 

co $> 

•J3 03 

Qi rfi 



OBITUARIES 

John Horace Moore, 62, superinten- 
dent of Pasquotank County Schools 
since 1947, died Aug. 23 at Elizabeth 
City. Funeral services were held Aug. 
25 at the First Baptist Church, Eliza- 
beth City. 

Supt. Moore previously served 12 
years as principal of the Farmville 
School in Pitt County; prior to that, 
he was principal at Ahoskie for five 
years. He held the M. A. degree in 
school administration from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina. He was a 
trustee of the College of the Albe- 
marle and Elizabeth City State Col- 
lege, a former chairman of the execu- 
tive committee of the Chowan Baptist 
Association, and had been active in 
the work of the Red Cross, the Per- 
quimans Health and Tuberculosis 
Association, and the Rotary Club. 

Survivors include his wife, two 
daughters, and two grandchildren. 



H. Lee Thomas, 72, former superin- 
tendent of Moore County Schools, 
died June 29 at Moore Memorial Hos- 
pital in Carthage. Funeral services 
were held June 30 at his church in 
Carthage. 

He retired as superintendent of 
Moore County Schools in 1960, having 
served in that post since 1929. Prior 
to that, he was superintendent of 
Onslow County Schools for two years. 
He was a native of Moore County and 
an alumnus of Elon College. 

Survivors include his wife, three 
daughters, three sons, and 17 grand- 
children. 

* * * 

Dr. William Jackson Scott, 53, prin- 
cipal of High Point High School, died 
July 28 at James Walker Memorial 
Hospital, Wilmington, after being 
stricken with a heart attack while 
vacationing with his family at Ocean 
Isle Beach. 

He had been principal of the High 
Point school since 1961. Prior to that, 
he served two years on a special as- 
signment as director of a study of 
teacher education for the State Board 
of Education. He was principal of 
the Mooresville High School for sev- 
eral years and had taught at schools 
in Forsyth County, Winston-Salem, 
Thomasville, and Mooresville. He was 
a graduate of the University of North 
Carolina and held the Ph. D. degree 
from UNC. 

Funeral services were held July 
10 at Wesley Memorial Church in 
High Point. Survivors include his 
wife, one son, and one daughter. 



Board Sets Amount of Education Expense Grants 



The State Board of Education 
on Aug. 5 set the amount which 
may be paid, under specified con- 
ditions, as a tuition grant to par- 
ents who wish to have their child 
attend a State-approved private 
nonsectarian school rather than a 
public school "which is being at- 
tended at that time by a child of 
another race." 

The Board set the grant at $1.42 
per day (a maximum annual grant 
of $255.60) and authorized the 
Controller of the State Board of 
Education to make budget allot- 
ments from the State Nine Months 
School Fund upon approval of an 
application for such a grant by 
the State Board, and upon funds 
for the payment of such grants 
being made available through the 
Budget Division of the Department 
of Administration either by a 
transfer of funds within the Nine 
Months School Fund budget or by 
an allocation from the Contin- 
gency and Emergency Fund. 

Formula Cited 

A. C. Davis, Controller, State 
Board of Education, said the 
amount of the grants was deter- 
mined by dividing the number of 
students in average daily attend- 
ance during the 1964-65 school 
year into the total current expen- 
ditures from State funds for 
school operations that year. 

An application for such a tui- 
tion grant must include detailed 



Charles Victor Sigmon, 56, princi- 
pal of Kernersville School in Forsyth 
County for the past 17 years, died of 
a heart attack at his home on July 20. 

A native of Catawba County, 
had served schools in Sherr'H's Ford, 
Mineral Springs, and Oak Summit in 
Forsyth County. A graduate of Duke 
University, he held the master's de- 
gree from the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. 

He was a member of Main Street 
Methodist Church in Kernersville. 
Survivors include his wife, two sons, 
and one grandchild. 



statements by the city or county 
board of education exercising ju- 
risdiction over the school adminis- 
trative unit within which the child 
resides. The application must in- 
clude the local board's findings as 
to the residential status of the 
child, his being "actually assigned 
to a public school which is being 
attended at that time by a child of 
another race," and information as 
to the possibility of his being as- 
signed to another public school. 

Payment of any such grant is 
contingent upon approval of the 
private nonsectarian school which 
the parents elect to have the child 
attend by the State Department of 
Public Instruction. 



None Received 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, stated that although a con- 
stitutional amendment providing 
for such tuition grants was ap- 
proved in 1956, the State Board of 
Education has not received any 
application for the grants since 
the amendment was approved. 

The Board's action followed an 
opinion by the Attorney General's 
office in response to an inquiry by 
Gov. Dan K. Moore as to the legal- 
ity of the tuition grants. (See 
"The Attorney General Rules 
. . . ," pp. 14-15, this issue.) 

Essentially, the Attorney Gen- 
eral declared that the grants could 
be made legally as long as the ex- 
istence of the private school in 
question does not depend primar- 
ily on funds derived from such 
grants. If a private school were 
supported principally by such 
grants, it could be held that the 
private school was an extension of 
the public school system, the opin- 
ion stated. 

J. E. Miller, Assistant State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
cited the following example: If 
tuition at a private school were 
$1,800 per year, the State tuition 
expense grant of $256 might be 
considered "incidental" and would 
therefore be valid. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Dr. Carroll Reviews Superintendency Changes 
In State's City, County Administrative Units 



At the beginning of the 1965-66 
school year, Dr. Charles F. Car- 
roll, State Superintendent, an- 
nounced that 28 of the State's 169 
school administrative units would 
have different superintendents 
than they had last year at this 
time, and one superintendency was 
vacant due to the death of the in- 
cumbent. 

Most of the superintendency 
changes occurred this summer, ef- 
fective July 1. Dr. Carroll noted 
that there are 23 "new" superin- 
tendents, of whom 8 have had ex- 
perience as assistant superintend- 
ents; 10 superintendents retired; 
6 became superintendents or as- 
sistant superintendents of other 
school units within the State; and 
4 accepted top administrative 
posts with educational institutions 
in the State. 

In the following list, the name 
of the unit's new superintendent is 
given first, followed by his previ- 
ous position; then the name of the 
former superintendent: 

ALLEGHANY: John F. Woodruff, 
prin., Piney Creek School, Alleghany 
Co.; John E. Rufty, retired. 

ANSON -.Arthur C. Summers, prin., 
Anson High School, Wadesboro; R. 0. 
McCollum, resigned due to illness. 

MORVEN (Anson Co.) : R. Donald 
Kennedy, prin., Wadesboro High 
School, Anson Co., George F. Wil- 
liams. 

WASHINGTON CITY (Beaufort 
Co.) : Jack D. Lawrie, prin., Robert 
E. Lee High School, Lynchburg, Va. ; 
Edwin A. West. 

CABARRUS : Jay Milton Robinson, 
asst. supt., Cabarrus Co.; C. A. Furr, 
retired. 

CALDWELL: Eugene M. White, 
asst. supt., Caldwell Co.; C. M. 
Abernethy, retired. 

CARTERET: Thaddeus Lenwood 
Lee, prin., West Carteret High School, 
Morehead City; Sam H. Helton, 
named supt., Currituck County. 

NEWTON-CONOVER (Catawba 
Co.) : Numie Sherrill Cranford, asst. 
supt., Gaston Co.; R. N. Gurley, 
retired. 

MURPHY (Cherokee Co.) : John 
Jordan, prin., Murphy Elementary 
School, Holland McSwain, named head 
of new Industrial Education unit in 
Cherokee Co. 



CURRITUCK: Sam H. Helton, 
supt. Carteret Co.; S. C. Chandler. 

THOMASVILLE (Davidson Co.) : 
William T. Bird, supt., Davie Co.; 
W. S. Horton, named to faculty of 
Campbell College. 

DAVIE: James E. Everidge, gen- 
eral supv., Davie Co.; W. T. Bird, 
named supt., Thomasville. 

CHERRYVILLE (Gaston Co.): 
Jasper L. Leivis, asst. supt., Johns- 
ton Co.; William H. Brown, named 
supt., Gastonia. 

GASTONIA (Gaston Co.) : W. H. 
Brown, supt., Cherryville; Woodroiv 
B. Sugg, named director, N. C. Com 
prehensive School Improvement Pro- 
ject. 

GREENE: Robert E. Strother, 
prin., Greene Central High School, 
Snow Hill; Gerald D. James, named 
supt., Wayne Co. 

HAYWOOD: J. H. Melton, prin., 
Daniels Jr. High School, Raleigh, 
named supt. of newly-consolidated 
unit; L. B. Leatherwood, supt., Hay- 
wood Co., and C. R. Dale, supt., 
Canton, named asst. supts. of new 
Haywood Co. unit. 

HYDE : Seth B. Henderson, prin., 
West Havelock School, Craven Co.; 
Ben D. Quinn, named asst. supt., 
Onslow Co. 

KINSTON (Lenoir Co.): R. Max 
Abbott, exec, secy., N. C. State School 
Boards Association, Chapel Hill; 
Jean P. Booth. 

MARTIN: Richard Eugene Rogers, 
asst. supt., Martin Co.; J. C. Mann- 
ing, retired. 

CHAPEL HILL (Orange Co.): 
Willard S. Swiers, asst. supt., Fayette- 
ville; Howard E. Thompson, named 
pres., Wilkes Community College. 

PASQUOTANK: Vacant; Supt. J. 
H. Moore died Aug. 23, 1965. 

ELIZABETH CITY (Pasquotank 
Co.) : Charles H. Weaver, asst. supt., 
Asheboro; Ben E. Fountain, named 
pres., Lenoir County Community 
College. 

PITT: Arthur S. Alford, asst. 
supt., Pitt Co.,; D. H. Conley, retired. 

RICHMOND: Joseph H. Wishon, 
asst. supt., Laurinburg-Scotland; F. 
D. McLeod, retired. 

ROBESON: Young H. Allen, asst. 
supt. Robeson Co.; B. E. Littlefield, 
retired. 

ROWAN: Jesse C. Carson, asst. 
supt., Rowan Co.; Charles C. Erwin, 
retired. 

WAYNE: Gerald D. James, supt., 
Greene Co.; R. S. Proctor, retired. 



Three New Staff Members 
Join School Planning Units 

Dr. J. L. Pierce, director, Division 
of School Planning, announced the 
resignation of one professional staff 
member and the addition of three new 
members during the summer. 

Charles R. Reed, Jr., design consul- 
tant with the Division for the past 
year, resigned in July to accept a 
position as program consultant with 
the Inter-America Trade Center in 
Miami, Fla. 

John Edward Justus joined the staff 
June 16 as educational consultant. A 
graduate of the University of Ten- 
nessee, he holds the M. S. in educa- 
tion administration from that institu- 
tion and is currently pursuing studies 
toward the doctorate. He was pre- 
viously principal in Anderson County 
Schools, Clinton, Tenn. for 4% years 
and prior to that was principal of 
schools in Knox County and Monroe 
County, Tenn. 

Richard Henry Schultz joined the 
staff July 12 as educational consul- 
tant. A graduate of Wisconsin State 
University, Oshkosh, he holds the 
M. S. in education administration 
from Appalachian State Teachers Col- 
lege and has done additional gradu- 
ate work at Duke University. He was 
previously teacher-coach in the Bro- 
ward County Schools, Ft. Lauderdale, 
Fla. His prior experience includes a 
year's service in the Army; 18 months 
as teacher, athletic director, and 
coach, Ripon Public Schools, Ripon, 
Wis.; six years as part-time sailing 
instructor at a yacht club in Ft. 
Lauderdale, and a year as part-time 
graduate assistant at Appalachian. 

Ralph O. Self joined the staff Sept. 
1 as a consulting engineer. He holds 
the B. S. in civil engineering and the 
M. S. in structural engineering from 
North Carolina State College, where 
he was graduate research assistant 
for two years. He was previously a 
structural engineer with Gardner, 
Esevier and Kline, Durham, for 10 
months, and with P. H. Brown and 
Associates, Raleigh, for 16 months. 
He also has had experience as a 
highway engineer with the N. C. 
State Highway Commission and as a 
highway engineer trainee with the 
Florida Road Department. 



FREMONT (Wayne Co.) : Leland 
V. Godwin, teacher, Fremont School; 
Lindsay C. Robinson. 

ELM CITY (Wilson Co.) : Jack P. 
Humphrey, prin., Lucama School, 
Wilson Co.; J. T. Odom, Jr., named 
asst. supt., Laurinburg-Scotland. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



11 



State Superintendent Announces Recent Changes 
In Vocational Education Division Staff Members 



Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, has 
announced several personnel changes 
in the Division of Vocational Educa- 
tion during the summer months 

Harry G. Beard resigned as act- 
ing director of the Division effective 
July 31 to join the faculty of North 
Carolina State University, in a joint 
position between the Department of 
Anthropology and Sociology and the 
School of Education. He received the 
Ed.D. degree from Cornell University 
in September. 

Dr. Joseph R. Clary, who served as 
acting associate director of the Divi- 
sion last spring and prior to that was 
State supervisor of Diversified and 
Comprehensive Vocational Education, 
resigned effective June 1 to become 
director of student personnel at Cald- 
well Technical Institute. 

Charles J. Law, Jr., assistant direc- 
tor of the Division, has been granted 
a leave of absence, effective Sept. 3 to 
continue graduate work toward the 
doctorate at Duke University. 

Clifton B. Belcher, assistant State 
supervisor of Distributive Education 
for the past year, was named assist- 
ant director, succeeding Law. 

Carl D. Whitehurst, formerly as- 
sistant State supervisor of Distribu- 
tive Education, has returned to that 
post, following a year as associate 
professor in the College of Education, 
University of Tennessee (teacher edu- 
cator in DE). 

Gerald W. Bray, assistant State su- 
pervisor, Guidance Services, assumed 
new duties as director of student af- 
fairs for Rockingham Community Col- 
lege, effective July 1. 

John D. Moore, assistant State su- 
pervisor, Guidance Services, was 
named director of vocational educa- 
tion for the Lumberton City Schools 
in July. 

Mrs. Lois S. Brown, area supervisor, 
School Food Services, accepted a po- 
sition with the N. C. Agricultural 
Extension Service in July. 

Larry W. Johnson, assistant State 
supervisor, Trade and Industrial Edu- 
cation, since July 1963, resigned in 
June to become executive secretary of 
the newly formed Vocational Indus- 
trial Clubs of America (VICA), which 
has its headquarters in the offices of 
the American Vocational Association 
at Washington, D. C. 



New Staff Members 

Fred E. Bishop joined the staff Sept. 
1 as assistant State supervisor, Dis- 
tributive Education. 

Education: B.A. and M.A. in Eng- 
lish, education, and religion, Wake 
Forest College; additional graduate 
work, Duke University, University of 
North Carolina, North Carolina State 
University. Experience: Two years, 
salesman, Rhodes Furniture Co., Dur- 
ham; two years, salesman, Sears, Roe- 
buck & Co., Durham; nine years, 
owner-manager, Bishop Cabinet Shop, 
Roxboro; sixteen years, teacher of 
English, Person County Schools; six 
years, teacher of distributive educa- 
tion, Person County Schools, Roxboro. 

Walter Lee Cox, Jr. joined the staff 
June 14 as assistant State supervisor, 
Diversified and Comprehensive Voca- 
tional Education. 

Education: B.S. (industrial arts), 
M.A. (administration), East Carolina 
College. Experience: three years, U. S. 
Army; five years, industrial arts 
teacher, Portsmouth, Va., and Wil- 
liamsburg, Va. ; 14 months, salesman, 
Anderson Box Co., Gainesville, Ga. ; 
three years, teacher (construction in- 
dustry, introduction to vocations, in- 
dustrial arts) , Concord City Schools. 

Mrs. Frances T. Johnson joined the 
staff July 15 as assistant State super- 
visor, Guidance Services. 

Education: B.S. (elementary educa- 
tion, social studies), Mary Washing- 
ton College, Fredericksburg, Va. ; 
M.A. (guidance), University of North 
Carolina, Chapel Hill; additional 
graduate study, Columbia University, 
University of Oslo (Norway). Expe- 
rience: three years, teacher, Cumber- 
land County, Moore County schools; 
two years, teacher-principal, Moore 
County Schools; one year, teacher- 
counselor, Fayetteville City Schools; 
five years, counselor, Fayetteville City 
Schools; one year, counselor, Winston- 
Salem /Forsyth Schools. 

Mrs. Hazel G. Tripp joined the staff 
July 19 as assistant State supervisor, 
Home Economics. 

Education: B.S. (home economics), 
East Carolina College; master's (fam- 
ily relations, education) University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro. Expe- 
rience: Ten years, teacher of voca- 
tional home economics — two years, 
Greene County Schools; two years, 
Pitt County Schools; six years, Mad- 
ison-Mayodan City Schools. 



Mrs. Rosalyn K. White joined the 
staff Sept. 1 as area supervisor, School 
Food Service. 

Education: B.S. (home economics), 
Western Michigan University, Kala- 
mazoo; M.S. (nutrition), Texas Wom- 
en's University, Denton; A.D.A. (ad- 
ministration dietitian), Washington 
University, Seattle. Experience : Three 
years, director, Cafeteria Services, 
Western Michigan University; one 
year, country club manager, Kalama- 
zoo, Mich.; seven years, co-owner, 
Salad Bowl Restaurant & Motel, Ar- 
lington, Texas; 14 months, assistant 
manager, cafeteria, University of 
Washington; one year, chief dietitian, 
St. Bernardine's Hospital, San Ber- 
nardino, Calif.; 30 months, district 
food supervisor, Baldwin Park 
(Calif.) Unified School District. 

John S. Blanton, Jr. joined the staff 
June 1 as assistant State supervisor, 
Trade and Industrial Education. 

Education: A. A., Gardner-Webb 
Junior College, Boiling Springs; B.S., 
North Carolina State University; ad- 
ditional work in vocational education, 
N. C. State University. Experience: 
Five years, aircraft electrician, Glenn 
L. Martin Co., Baltimore, Md.; five 
years, co-owner, J. S. Blanton & Sons, 
Lattimore, N. C. ; 10 years, coordina- 
tor, Wake County Schools. 

Wallace W. Burke joined the staff 
Aug. 1 as assistant State supervisor, 
Trade and Industrial Education. 

Education: A.B. (physical educa- 
tion) Elon College; now completing 
work towards master's (industrial ed- 
ucation), North Carolina State Uni- 
versity; additional graduate work, 
University of North Carolina, Greens- 
boro. Experience: Ten years, I.C.T. 
coordinator — five years, Burlington 
City Schools; five years, Alamance 
County Schools. 

James L. Gearhart joined the staff 
Aug. 1 as assistant State supervisor, 
Trade and Industrial Education. 

Education: B.S. (industrial arts), 
M.A. (education, administration), 
East Carolina College; additional 
graduate work, North Carolina State 
University. Experience: Three years, 
U. S. Coast Guard, Korean War (now 
lieutenant, U.S.C.G. Reserve, Wil- 
mington); eight months, directory 
sales, compilation, Carolina Telephone 
& Telegraph Co., Tarboro; one year, 
teacher, Brunswick County Schools, 
Southport; two years, teacher, New 
Hanover Schools, Wilmington; four 
years, teacher-coordinator, I.C.T., New 
Hanover Schools. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Director of Instructional Services Division 
Announces Staff Changes During Summer Months 



Nile F. Hunt, director, Division of 
Instructional Services, has announced 
several recent personnel changes in 
the Division, most of them during the 
summer: 

Ayden D. Lassiter, formerly assist- 
ant State supervisor, Veterans Edu- 
cation, Division of Vocational Edu- 
cation, was reassigned to the Driver 
and Safety Education staff as con- 
sultant. 

Miss Marion Hamilton, consultant, 
Education for the Exceptionally Tal- 
ented, resigned effective July 31 to 
become principal of the Frances E. 
Lacy School in Raleigh. 

Mme. Yvonne Vukovic, visiting con- 
sultant in Foreign Languages for the 
1964-65 school year under a program 
sponsored by the Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare, re- 
turned to her home in Paris in late 
August, with her husband and infant 
son. 

Mrs. Olive Taylor, temporary con- 
sultant, Mathematics Education 
(NDEA), was named consultant in 
Mathematics Education. 

Dr. John W. Magill, supervisor of 
psychological services, Special Edu- 
cation, resigned Aug. 6 to accept a 
teaching position with North Carolina 
State University at the Fort Bragg 
Extension Center. 

Allan Cohen, consultant in educa- 
tion of the mentally retarded, Special 
Education, resigned June 17 to be- 
come assistant regional representative 
with the Charlottesville, Va. Regional 
Office, Division of Vocational Reha- 
bilitation, Department of Health, Ed- 
ucation, and Welfare. 

Miss Betty Smith, consultant, Tele- 
vision Education, resigned July 31 to 
become television education coordina- 
tor for the public schools of Mmeola, 
Long Island, N. Y. 

Mrs. Mary P. Scott, television stu- 
dio teacher of World History, resigned 
to go to Albuquerque, N. Mex., where 
her husband is completing his medical 
residency. 

C. Baxter Twiddy, television studio 
teacher of Geography and Govern- 
ment, accepted a teaching position 
with the Raleigh City Schools. 



New Staff Members 

Milton D. Rhoads joined the staff 
April 8 as consultant, Driver and 
Safety Education. 

Education: B.S. (physical educa- 
tion) Central Michigan University; 
M.A. (driver education and traffic 
safety — graduate assistant) Michigan 
State University; Infantry Officer 
School, Airborne Training School, Ft. 
Benning, Ga. ; Canadian Military Po- 
lice School, Camp Borden, Ontario; 
Officer Military Police School, Ft. 
Gordon, Ga. Experience: Officer, U. S. 
Army Military Police (captain at time 
of honorable discharge), service at 
several stations in U. S., overseas 
service in Korea. 



Robert R. Jones joined the staff 
July 15 as consultant, Mathematics 
Education (NDEA). 

Education: B.S. (mathematics edu- 
cation), N. C. State University, Ra- 
leigh; M.A. (mathematics), Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. 
Experience: Four summers, manager 
of Scotland County Produce Market; 
five years, mathematics teacher (3, 
Raleigh City Schools; 2, Arlington 
County Schools, Virginia). 



John Martin Goode joined the staff 
June 28 as consultant, Science Edu- 
cation (NDEA). 

Education: A.B. (chemistry) , Kan- 
sas State Teachers College, Emporia; 
MA. (science education), Ohio State 
University. Experience: four years 
part-time laboratory assistant, Kansas 
State Teachers College; one year part- 
time chemistry laboratory instructor, 
University of Kansas; three years, 
teacher of chemistry, Wyandotte High 
School, Kansas City, Kan.; 22 months, 
assistant director, Academic Year In- 
stitute, Ohio State University. 



Miss Serena Rankin Parks joined 
the Television Education staff June 21 
as studio teacher of World History. 

Education: B.A. (history), Univer- 
sity of North Carolina, Greensboro; 
M.A. (social science education), Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, Chapel 
Hill. Experience: Three years, teacher 
of world history, Charlotte-Mecklen- 
burg Schools. 



Miss Catherine O. Rydesky joined 
the Television Education staff as con- 
sultant early in September. 

Education: B.S. (liberal arts, edu- 
cation), St. Mary's College of Notre 
Dame University; M.A. (communica- 
tions), Stanford University (work in- 
cluded three months' internship, Na- 
tional Association of Educational 
Broadcasters, Washington, D. C; 
three months' participation, Institute 
on Radio, Television and Films, San 
Francisco.) Experience: First honor- 
ary Papal Volunteer to Latin America 
(1962), as teacher in private and gov- 
ernment schools (junior college, high 
school, elementary levels), social work- 
er, camp counselor; previous experi- 
ence in radio studio work, Emporium, 
Pa. and Pittsburgh, Pa. Awards: 
Named Outstanding Young Woman of 
America, 1965-66 (nominated by 
American Association of University 
Women) ; presented NBC Award for 
Outstanding Work in Radio (Station 
KNBR, San Francisco). 



Advancement School Wins 
Recognition as 'Pacemaker' 

The North Carolina Advance- 
ment School was presented a Pace- 
maker Award at the National Ed- 
ucation Association's convention 
at New York City in June. 

Sponsored by NEA and Parade 
Magazine, the Pacemaker Awards 
are presented each year to the 
school or school system in each 
state in recognition of valuable 
contribution to education. 

Dr. Lois Edinger of Greensboro, 
president of NEA last year, pre- 
sented the awards. 

Annual Open House Planned 

The School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences at North Carolina 
State University, Raleigh, will hold 
its annual Open House on Satur- 
day, Oct. 30. 

Dean H. Brooks James said that 
special guests again will include 
school students, principals, super- 
intendents, guidance counselors, 
and science teachers. 

Activities are scheduled to begin 
at 8:30 a.m. at William Neal Rey- 
nolds Coliseum. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



13 



she ritto>tm>e44> QeHe^cU Ruled 



SUBJECT: Public Schools; Education Ex- 
pense Grants; Article 35 of Chapter 
115 of the General Statutes; Constitu- 
tional Law; Legal Validity of Tuition 
Expense Grants for Attendance at Pri- 
vate, Nonsectarian School; Article IX, 
Section 12, of Constitution of North 
Carolina. 

14 July 1965 

Honorable Dan K. Moore 

Governor of North Carolina 

Capitol 

Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dear Governor Moore 

You state that the question of the 
use of education grants to be paid on 
behalf of children who elect, through 
their parents or guardians, to attend 
private, nonsectarian schools has 
arisen and is under consideration in 
your office. You inquire of this office 
as to the legal validity and nature 
of education expense grants under 
the statutes and Constitution of North 
Carolina. We assume that what you 
want to know is our opinion as to 
whether or not these expense educa- 
tion grants can lawfully be made and 
if it is valid and proper to use public 
funds for such purpose. 

At the general election held on 
September 8, 1956, the people ap- 
proved a constitutional amendment 
which now appears as Article IX, 
Section 12, of the Constitution of this 
State. This section authorizes the 
General Assembly to provide for pay- 
ment of education expense grants 
from any State or local public funds 
for the private education of any child 
for whom no public school is avail- 
able or for the private education of 
a child who is assigned against the 
wishes of his parents, or the person 
having control of such child, to a 
public school attended by a child of 
another race. Education expense 
grants under the Constitution are 
available only for education in a non- 
sectarian school and where the reason 
is advanced is that a child is assigned 
to a public school attended by a child 
of another race, the grant is avail- 
able only when it is not reasonable 
and practicable to re-assign such 
child to a public school not attended 
by a child of another race. 

In 1956, at an extra session of the 
General Assembly, there was enacted 
Article 35 of Chapter 115 of the 
General Statutes (Chapter 3 of Ex- 
tra Session of 1956) whereby the Gen- 



eral Assembly in statutory form 
stated the eligibility conditions for 
education expense grants, how the 
amount of the grant should be de- 
termined and paid out, certain regu- 
latory powers given to the State 
Board of Education and procedure 
for appeals when applications for 
tuition grants were denied; it was 
expressly provided that funds of this 
character could only be used for at- 
tendance of pupils in private, non- 
sectarian schools. Up to this time, so 
far as we know, no applications have 
been made for such tuition grants 
and no public funds have been ex- 
pended for such purpose. The Educa- 
tion Expense Grant Statute appar- 
ently contemplates that the State 
shall pay for such grants, but there 
is a section of the Statute (G.S. 115- 
286) which in a permissive manner 
allows tax levying authorities for any 
administrative unit, upon recommen- 
dation of the Board of Education, to 
appropriate amounts from any local 
tax or nontax funds for a local edu- 
cation expense grant. You will find 
that under Chapter 6 of the Extra 
Session of 1956, it was provided that 
for the fiscal year 1956-57, "There 
shall, from time to time, be allocated 
to the State Board of Education from 
the Continguency and Emergency 
Fund such amounts as are necessary 
for education expense grants in ac- 
cordance with Article 35, Chapter 115 
of the North Carolina General Sta- 
tutes, and such amounts as are neces- 
sary for the administration of said 
Article." We do not deem it necessary 
in the resolution of your inquiry to 
discuss the details of the Education 
Expense Grant Statute to any fur- 
ther extent. 

The only legal decisions that we 
have been able to find on this subject 
are those made by the Federal courts 
by reason of the use of education or 
tuition expense grants in the State 
of Virginia. We are compelled, there- 
fore, to rely on these decisions having 
in mind that in this field nothing can 
be regarded as finally decided. Ap- 
parently the principle of stare decisis 
is utterly disregarded and no one can 
legally regard principles in this field 
as firmly settled. 

In our opinion the definitive case 
on the subject is GRIFFIN v. STATE 
BOARD OF EDUCATION, 239 F. 
Supp. 560. This is a Virginia case 
and was decided by a 3-judge Federal 



Court on March 9, 1965. The Court 
deals with the validity of education 
or tuition grants, and the Court lays 
down the rules or a general criterion 
as to when education or tuition grants 
are not validly appropriated and 
when such grants are valid. For the 
purposes of this opinion we adopt 
this criterion for we think it is sensi- 
bly and logically constructed. We 
quote from the Opinion of the Court 
to some extent, as follows: 

"The general criterion by which we must 
determine whether a grant or grants are 
legitimately appropriated is, on our analy- 
sis, this : 

"Payment of a tuition grant for use in 
a private school is legal if it does not 
tend in a determinative degree to perpetu- 
a e segregation. The test is not the policy 
of the school, but the exclusion on account 
of race. Every exclusive school is not a 
forbidden school. The part played by the 
grant in effectuating the exclusion, to 
repeat, is the pivotal point. It is decisive 
because the ex'ent of such participation 
determines whether or not the exclusion 
is State action — the fundamental question 
here. Absent the reach of the State, of 
course no Fourteenth Amendment abridg- 
ment is suggested. Peterson v. Greenville, 
373 U. S. 244, 247 (1963). 

"This gauge, we think, does not deviate 
from the teaching of Cooper v. Aaron, 
358, U. S. 1, 4, 19 (1958). An uncon- 
trolling financial contribution to a private 
school through a State grant would not 
be, in our interpretation, 'to use (the 
State's) governmental powers to bar chil- 
dren on racial grounds from attending 
schools where there is state participation 
through any arrangement, management, 
funds or property'. In our test. State 
invo'vement cannot be dominant. Nor 
would the use we deem permissive consti- 
tute the 'support' frowned upon by the 
Court, for the schools would not be 'main- 
tained' by such incidental use. 

"Application of the standard we suggest 
would give these specific results: 

"1. Grants for use in an exclusively 'white' 
school within or without Virginia would 
not be disallowed if the money only in- 
substantially contributed to the running 
of the school. If the ratio of the amount 
of the grant to the cost of maintenance 
and operation is relatively low, the ten- 
dency of the grant to affect the character 
of the school in law is correspondingly 
slight. For example: $250 or $275, the 
amount of a grant, might be but a 
meagre part of the tuition paid in many 
private schools, and, again, the presence 
of a relatively few scholarship children 
among a student body of severa' hundred 
would mean that the Virginia money was 
no more than a minim of support. 

"2. On the other hand, if the private 
school is the creature of, or is preponder- 
antly maintained by, the grants, then the 
operation of the school is State action, 
and payment of the grants therefore is a 
circumvention of the equal protection 
clause of the Constitution. This was the 
major premise upon which the Supreme 
Court and the Court of Appeals of the 
Fourth Circuit, respectively, in Griffin v. 
School Board, supra, 377 U. S. 218: Grif- 
fin et al v. Board of Supervisors, supra, 

F. 2d (4 Cir. Dec. 2, 

1964), held the tuition grants not per- 
missibly payable to the Prince Edward 
County Foundation or the Surry County 
Foundation. 

(Continued on page 15) 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



*]he AttoJM&f QeneSuU Ruled, . . 



TV 'Methods for Teachers' 
Series Schedule Announced 



(Continued from page 14) 



"III. Because, to repeat, the plaintiffs 
allege that tuition grants are illegally 
expended when, with knowledge of the 
defendants, the grants are used in the 
private schools referred to in the com- 
plaint, it becomes necessary to look at the 
source of the financial support of those 
schools. There we find, incontestably, that 
the grants are the main support of each 
of them. This contribution is of such 
relative magnitude that they plainly are 
State supported institutions. Thus the 
State is nurturing segregated schools. 
Hence, the defendants must be enjoined 
from providing money to be funnelled by 
the parents into these schools so long as 
segregation is practiced in them." 

If the private, nonsectarian school 
is a mere extension, substitute or 
agency for the public school, then, 
of course, the grants are invalid and 
in nearly all such cases we find that 
the education or tuition grant is the 
actual, dominant, financial support of 
such a school, and the school could 
not exist without a combined number 
of these grants. If, on the other hand, 
the private, nonsectarian school has 
its own financial structure and mode 
of operation quite independent from 
and aside from the State money in the 
form of grants, and if the State 
grants for tuition purposes are mere- 
ly an incidental or collateral part of 
the school financial structure, then 
it would appear that such grants are 
constitutional and valid. 

Grants of public money for educa- 
tional purposes are not new things; 
you will recall grants made to vet- 
erans so they could complete their 
education. Finally, it should be noted 
while the Virginia constitutional pro- 
vision and its implementing statute 
do not mention race, the North Caro- 
lina constitutional provision and im- 
plementing statute do mention race. 
The North Carolina statute refers to 
a public school attended by a child 
of another race as a qualifying con- 
dition. It should be noted, however, 
that this does not refer to any par- 
ticular race, and the parents of a 
white child could be motivated by the 
fact that the school has Indian or 
Chinese students, and by the same 
token the parents of a colored child 
may object to the white race, or any 
other race, and they would be eligi- 
ble to receive tuition grants. We do 
not believe, therefore, that the sta- 
tute violates the equal protection of 
the law clause or other provision of 
the Federal Constitution. We think 
the statute is constitutional and valid 
on its face but it could, of course, be 
administered in an unconstitutional 
manner. 



Assuming that the existence of a 
private, nonsectarian school is not due 
primarily to funds derived from these 
tuition grants, and assuming that 
such a school has its own, indepen- 
dent financial structure and basis, 
we are of the opinion that education 
or tuition grants from public State 
funds can be appropriated and made 
and that they are constitutional and 
valid. In giving this opinion we have 
in mind, of course, that the child 
meets the eligibility conditions of the 
statute. This is our present opinion 
from the best legal authorities now 
available. 

Yours very truly, 
T. W. BRUTON 
Attorney General 

/s/ Ralph Moody 

Deputy Attorney General 



In-School Television Class 
Schedule for Year Listed 

John R. B. Hawes, State super- 
visor, Television Education, has 
announced the schedule for in- 
school television courses to be pre- 
sented by the State Department of 
Public Instruction during the cur- 
rent school year. 

All lessons will be televised over 
Channel 4, Chapel Hill ; Channel 2, 
the new station at Columbia; and 
other stations of the State educa- 
tional TV network as these go into 
operation, Hawes said. 

Four courses will be presented 
daily, Monday through Friday 
mornings : 

U. S. History (11th Grade) 

9:00-9:30 
Physical Science (9th Grade) 

9:30-10:00 
World History (10th Grade) 

10:00-10:30 
Mathematics (8th Grade) 

10:30-11:00 

Parlous Francais, the element- 
ary-level French courses, will be 
televised Wednesdays and Friday 
mornings at the following times: 

Level I, 11:00-11:15 
Level II, 11:20-11:35 
Level III, 11:40-11:55 



A wide range of topics will be 
included in the popular television 
series, "Methods for Modern 
Teachers," which will be broadcast 
again this year on Wednesday af- 
ternoons (3:30-4:00) over WUNC- 
TV, Channel 4, Chapel Hill. 

The series is developed coopera- 
tively by the University of North 
Carolina School of Education, sev- 
eral North Carolina school systems, 
and the State Department of Pub- 
lice Instruction. Program topics 
are selected by the Television Ad- 
visory Programing Council for 
School-Related Programs of the 
University of North Carolina. 

Further information on the 
series may be obtained from Dr. 
Donald Tarbet, School of Educa- 
tion, University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill, or John R. B. 
Hawes, Jr., supervisor, Television 
Education, State Department of 
Public Instruction, Raleigh. 

In the following program sched- 
ule, letters in parentheses follow- 
ing the topic indicate the level of 
instructional personnel at whom 
the program is aimed. 



Sept. 29 
Oct. 6 
13 
20 
27 
3 
10 



Nov. 



17 
Dec. 1 



15 

22-29 



Jan. 5 

12 
19 
26 

2 

9 

16 

23 

2 
9 
16 
23 
30 
Apr. 6 
13 
20 



Feb. 



Mar. 



May 



27 



Physical Science (J) 
Physical Science (J) 
Jr. High School Reading (J) 
Jr. High School Reading (J) 
Life Science (J) 
Life Science (J) 

Instructional Bulletin Boards and 
Exhibits (E,J,S) 
Art Appreciation — Elementary 
School (E) 

N. C. Art Museum (E.J.S) 
Creativity in Art (E,J,S) 
Handwriting (E) 
NO PROGRAMS— CHRISTMAS 
HOLIDAYS 

Library Resources in Language 
Arts: Selection and Utilization 
(E,J,S) 

Library Resources in Social Studies: 
Selction and Utilization (E.J.S) 
Using Audiovisual Materials in 
Classroom Instruction (E,J,S) 
Preparation of Instructional Mater- 
ials (E.J.S) 

Emotional Problems of Children 
(E.J.S) 

Emotional Problems of Children 
(E.J.S) 

Emotional Problems of Children 
(E.J.S) 

Emotional Problems of Children 
(E.J.S) 

Music — Elementary School (E) 
Music — Elementary School (E) 
English — Elementary School (E) 
English — Linguistics (S) 
English — Linguistics (S) 
Social Studies — Primary Grades (E) 
Social Studies — Primary Grades (E) 
Mathematics — Elementary School 
<E) 

Basic Adult Education Project 
(E.J.S) 

N. C. Advancement School (E,J,S) 
Comprehensive School Improvement 
Project (E,J,S) 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



IS 



Notice to Readers on Revision of Mailing List 



The State Department of Public 
Instruction is revising its mailing 
list to comply with new postal 
regulations and to minimize cor- 
rections which must be made 
periodically due to changes of ad- 
dress. 

Effective with the mailing of 
the October issue of the North 
Carolina Public School Bulletin, 
this new mailing list will be used. 

The new postal regulations re- 
quire that second, third, and 
fourth class mail carry the com- 
plete mailing address of each ad- 
dressee, including the ZIP Code. 
A complete mailing address in- 
cludes the street number, street, 
city or town, state, and ZIP Code; 
or the post office box number, city 
or town, state, and ZIP Code; or 
the route number, city or town, 
state, and ZIP Code. 

Complete mailing addresses are 
being secured for the following 
categories of addressees. 

Individuals or organizations not 
included in the categories listed 
below who wish to continue receiv- 
ing the North Carolina Public 
School Bulletin are requested to 
fill out the form below, or to fur- 
nish the same information on a 
postal card, and to send this form 
or card to: 

Publications Editor 
State Department of Public In- 
struction 
Raleigh, N. C. 27602 

If you are not included in the 
categories listed below or do not 
notify us of your wish to continue 
receiving the Bulletin, your name 
will be dropped from the mailing 
list. If you are not sure of your 
exact mailing address, check with 
local postal authorities. 



North Carolina school administra- 
tive units: School superintendents, as- 
sistant superintendents, directors of 
instruction, board of education mem- 
bers, board of education attorneys, 
school principals, and school libraries. 

North Carolina State Government: 
The Governor's Office, members of 
the Legislature, heads of all State 
agencies, members of the State Board 
of Education, officers of the State 
Board of Higher Education. 

Educational agencies, associations, 
etc. in North Carolina: heads of all 
educational agencies, education asso- 
ciations, foundations, research cen- 
ters, and special schools listed in the 
Educational Directory of North Caro- 
lina. 

Colleges, universities, and other 
educational institutions in North Car- 
olina: Presidents, deans of schools of 
education or chairmen of education 
departments, and libraries of all pub- 
lice and private colleges and univer- 
sities; presidents and libraries of all 
technical institutes and industrial 
education centers. 

All public libraries in North Caro- 
lina. 

Communications media in North 
Carolina: Education editors of all 
newspapers, news directors of all 
radio and television stations. 

Federal Government: Members of 
Congress; Commissioner and heads 
of bureaus, U. S. Office of Education; 
Secretary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare; other Federal agencies now 
included on mailing list. 

Chief School Officers of the 50 
States and U. S. Territories. 

Foreign Countries: all individuals, 
agencies, and institutions included on 
the present mailing list. 

Recent requests: All individuals, 
agencies, etc. which have submitted 
requests for inclusion on the mailing 
list or changes of address since July 
1965 need not send in requests again, 
unless complete mailing addresses 
were not given. 



Please 


INFORMATION FOR 
North Carolina Public 
continue sending the North Cay 


MAILING 

School Bu 
olina Pubh 


LIST 

lletin 

c School Bulletin to: 


Name of 


individua 


1 or organization 










Street N< 


)., Street; 


or P. O. Box No. 


or Route No 








Town or 


City 




Stat< 






Zip Code 



LOOKING BACK 

In September issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 



Five Years Ago, 1 960 

G. H. Ferguson, director of the 
Division of Negro Education, re- 
tired June 30 after 39 years on 
the staff of the State Department 
of Public Instruction. He was as- 
sistant director of the Division 
from 1921 to 1950, when he was 
named director. 

A placement service for teach- 
ers has been inaugurated by the 
Department, with Clifton T. Ed- 
wards in charge. 

Ten Years Ago, 1955 

Dr. S. E. Duncan, supervisor of 
Negro High Schools in the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
has prepared a 141-page bulletin 
on "Tasks of Negro Union School 
Principals in North Carolina." 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1950 

J. E. Miller, associate in the Di- 
vision of Instructional Services 
since 1947, has been appointed ad- 
ministrative assistant to State 
Superintendent Clyde A. Erwin. 
Miller was State director of Adult 
Education before entering the 
Navy as an officer in 1942. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1 945 

Wade M. Jenkins, superinten- 
dent of Union County Schools, has 
been named director of the Divi- 
sion of Textbooks, succeeding Eg- 
bert N. Peeler, who resigned to 
become superintendent of the State 
School for the Blind and Deaf. 
A. J. Dickson has been named as- 
sistant director of the Division. 

Twenty-Five Years Ago, 1940 

A State Salary Schedule revi- 
sion made possible by the $350,000 
increase in instructional service 
funds for the second year of the 
biennium will increase the mini- 
mum salary for teachers from $72 
to $82 per month and the maximum 
from $126 to $128, for teachers 
with eight years' experience. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



D 



*b 



: 2>o/Zb 



Iducational 

RESS 

SSOCI ATION 

OF 

MERICA 




North Carolina State Library 

Raleiqh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



OCTOBER 1965 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, No. 2 



D 



tc 

oc. 




State Staff Committees Push Groundwork Plans 
For Implementing Programs Under Education Act 



A 10-member Steering Commit- 
tee composed of staff members of 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction and four staff subcom- 
mittees have been engaged for 
several weeks in laying the 
groundwork for State-level plan- 
ning necessary to implement pro- 
visions of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, appointed the Steering Com- 
mittee early in September, nam- 
ing Carlton T. Fleetwood, State 
NDEA coordinator, as its chair- 
man. The four subcommittees, 
subsequently named, were charged 
with the responsibility of devel- 
oping plans and proposals for 
projects under Titles I, II, III, and 
V of the Act, respectively. 

Report on Activities 

Fleetwood and the subcommit- 
tee chairmen reviewed the group's 
responsibilities and activities at 
meetings of staff members of the 
Department in September and 
early October. 

"The Steering Committee," 
Fleetwood stated, "is responsible 
for ascertaining the responsibili- 
ties of the State Board of Educa- 
tion in administering the various 
programs under the Act; for de- 
termining the documents to be 
prepared and submitted to the 
U. S. Office of Education as called 
for in the Federal regulations for- 
mulated pursuant to the Act; and 
for making recommendations to 
the State Superintendent and the 
Controller of the Board of Educa- 
tion concerning procedures for 
implementing programs and proj- 
ects authorized by the Act." 



The members of the Committee 
are Dr. Woodrow Sugg, Miss Thel- 
ma Cumbo, Bert Westbrook, Miss 
Marie Haigwood, Miss Cora Paul 
Bomar, T. Carl Brown, John R. B. 
Hawes, Dr. Joseph Johnston, and 
Calvin Criner. 

Washington Meeting 

They accompanied Fleetwood on 
a trip to Washington Sept. 16-17 
for a two-day conference with 
U. S. Office of Education person- 
nel, who explained the responsi- 
bilities of the State Board of Ed- 
ucation under Titles I, II, III, and 
V. Fleetwood, Dr. Sugg, and Miss 
Bomar made another trip to Wash- 
ington the following week to dis- 
cuss specific provisions of the Act 
with U. S. Office of Education 
staff members. Previously, sev- 
eral members of the Committee 
and other State staff members had 
attended a regional orientation 
conference on the ESEA. 

Subcommittee Heads 

The subcommittee chairmen and 
the ESEA titles with which their 
groups are concerned are Dr. 
Sugg, Title I; Miss Bomar, Title 
II; Hawes, Title III, and Dr. John- 
ston, Title V. 

In mid-October, Fleetwood and 
the subcommittee chairmen at- 
tended a regional conference at 
Atlanta to become further ac- 
quainted with specific require- 
ments, forms and procedures to 
be used in the development of pro- 
grams under the Act. Others at- 
tending the Atlanta conference 
were A. C. Davis, Controller, State 
Board of Education; J. A. Porter, 
director, Division of Auditing and 
Accounting, Controller's Office; 
and J. L. Cashwell, Lorraine Cum- 
bo, Marie Haigwood, and Bert 
Westbrook of the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction. 



State Board Backs Proposal 

For Regional Research Unit 

The State Board of Education 
has given its official support to 
efforts to obtain Federal approval 
for establishment of a regional 
educational laboratory in the Re- 
search Triangle area under pro- 
visions of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965. 

An initial proposal for the re- 
search center, drafted by the 
Learning Institute of North Caro- 
lina, was approved by the Board 
at its regular meeting on Sept. 2. 

The Board's action was contin- 
gent on the "specific understand- 
ing that submission of the propos- 
al carries no financial commitment 
expressed or implied on behalf of 
the State Board of Education." 

Joint committees representing 
Duke University, the University 
of North Carolina, and the State 
Board of Education were engaged 
for several months in working up 
suggestions to be included in the 
proposal. 

Dr. C. Ray Carpenter of Penn- 
sylvania State University served 
as LINC's consultant in preparing 
the plan. 

Regional Meetings 

Plans were made by the Com- 
mittee and subcommittees for a se- 
ries of regional meetings the last 
week in October for the purpose of 
acquainting superintendents and 
other personnel of local school ad- 
ministrative units with procedures 
and forms which the local units 
may use in submitting projects un- 
der Titles I and II. 

The staff committees prepared 
a summary of the responsibilities 
of the State Board of Education 
under the ESEA for presentation 
to the Board at its October meet- 
ing. 



Superintendent Gawoll ScufA, . . . 

(Excerpts from address at Superintendents' Conference, Mars Hill, July 28, 1965) 

Among all of the new circumstances with which we are confronted, 
I doubt that any compare or will compare with those relating to the 
implementation of educational acts passed by the Congress and 
placed under the administration and interpretation of the United 
States Office of Education or other federal agencies. I make this 
statement because I know first-hand that many of us are devoting 
more than one-half of our time to federal projects and relationships. . . 

There is every indication that federalized programs of education 
of a diverse nature will continue to increase in number and scope. 
Merely to keep abreast of the titles and the purposes of these several 
educational enterprises is difficult within itself. As an educator and as 
a taxpayer, my chief concern is the probable duplication and repeti- 
tion of activities along these educational fronts. In order that these 
federal programs might be intelligently and economically organized 
and administered, I am more confirmed than ever in the conviction 
that the delegation of the responsibilities inherent within these pro- 
grams should be entrusted to the extent possible to established legal 
educational agencies at State and local levels. I feel strongly that in 
North Carolina all programs of education from the 12th grade 
downward in any geographical area should be under the jurisdiction 
of the county or city board of education within the area. In order that 
this circumstance might prevail— and it does not prevail now— boards 
of education cannot afford to default in their responsibility for a 
total comprehensive program of education within the area over which 
they preside. I think that common honesty requires us to say that 
some of the federalized program of education is the result of a void 
in program and services which we have permitted to come about. I 
dislike the thought that other than county and city boards of educa- 
tion shall operate educational programs within the same territory as 
that in which the boards of education are supposed to operate. We 
do not need two school administrators and two boards of education 
in the same administrative unit trying to plan educational programs 
for the same people. 

Looking to the future also in the light of the demands devolving 
upon us, I express the hope that with the passing of time there will be 
less need for State regulations in the operation of the schools of this 
State. I do not want to be misinterpreted here, but I want to be forth- 
right. My lifetime of educational experience in North Carolina con- 
vinces me that many State regulations arise out of an unmet need at 
the local level. A State regulation might be designed to cover the 
deficiencies in ten administrative units and yet invariably the regula- 
tion becomes applicable to all units. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

CHARLES F. CARROLL J. E. MILLER, 

State Supt. of Public Instruction V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

If the method (of instruction) 
is to excite a taste for knowledge, 
it must, in the first place, be nat- 
ural. For what is natural takes 
place without compulsion. Water 
need not be forced to run down 
a mountainside. ... It is not nec- 
essary to persuade a bird to fly; 
it does so as soon as the cage is 
opened. — John Amos Comenius 



Errors in the selection of either 
ideas or leaders is a calculated risk 
in a democracy. Education is chal- 
lenged to produce a more mature 
society effective in the coordinate 
use of both group judgment and 
individual intelligence. This ma- 
turity requires that the group 
should hear the unusual sugges- 
tion or the proposal of a disagreer 
but it requires, also, that the indi- 
vidual will not confuse "being dif- 
ferent" with "being wise." — Mau- 
rice F. Freehill in Gifted Children: 
Their Psychology and Education 
(Macmillan) 



Competition brings us better 
cosmetics, cars and cabbage, but 
no one has yet proved that it brings 
us a better education. . . . The 
need for and the fear of competi- 
tion corrode the personality. . . . 
There are — or there could be — in- 
ternal rewards in the feeling of 
having done a job well, accom- 
plished a mission or solved a prob- 
lem. These are not "competitive" 
. . . because they do not represent 
triumph over fellow human be- 
ings. — Henry A. Davidson, in Edu- 
cation magazine, November 1955. 



Vol. XXX, No. 2 



October 1965 



Lip service to the idea of stu- 
dent self-government and to other 
responsible uses of freedom in 
many high schools makes the prin- 
cipal feel better when he is talking 
to other principals at conventions. 
But as far as having any meaning 
for the youngsters goes, too much 
of what happens in the name of 
responsibility for students con- 
sists of shuffling minutiae rather 
than a real opportunity for the 
demonstration of a developing 
maturity. — Harold Howe, II 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



/4&uancitt<f an the tf-ianiieid. 



One of the promising features 
of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965 which has 
received far less publicity than the 
more sweeping provisions of Titles 
I, II, and III is the authorization 
of increased grants for construc- 
tion of national and regional edu- 
cational research facilities, expan- 
sion of current programs of re- 
search and development, and a new 
program of training for education- 
al researchers. 

Private industries have long 
since found it to their advantage 
to devote relatively huge sums to 
research and development activi- 
ties — often as much as 10 percent 
of their annual expenditures, it is 
pointed out in an article in the 
April issue of American Education. 
It is disconcerting, then, to realize 
that less than one-fifth of one per- 
cent of the $34 billion spent for 
education in the United States last 
year went for research and devel- 
opment. 

It is widely recognized that 
there is a considerable lag between 
the development of improved in- 
structional methods and curricula, 
school facilities and equipment, 
and organizational patterns and 
the widespread introduction of 
these in the public schools. The 
need to catch up with the best that 
is known, however, does not call 
for less expenditure of funds and 
effort in research and develop- 
ment, but for more. 

Surely, the returns on the pit- 
tances invested over the past few 
decades in these activities are 
sufficiently impressive to suggest 
that augmenting resources and 
work in these areas could well pro- 
duce results far exceeding expec- 
tations. 

The most promising theories 
stand idle and unproductive until 
tested and until information re- 
garding their successful applica- 
tion is widely disseminated. This 
requires investment of funds and 
the skill of highly trained and 
competent investigators. 

Tar Heel citizens interested in 
the improvement of educational 
opportunities in our State — and 
the record of popular support for 



progressive measures indicates 
that they are legion — can derive no 
little satisfaction from the steps 
which are being taken in North 
Carolina to stimulate educational 
research and development. 

Most recently, the State Board of 
Education has lent its support to 
the proposal developed by the 
Learning Institute of North Caro- 
lina in cooperation with Duke Uni- 
versity and the University of North 
Carolina for the establishment in 
the Research Triangle area of one 
of the regional research centers 
under Title IV. The 1965 General 
Assembly enacted legislation au- 
thorizing the University of North 
Carolina and the Chapel Hill Board 
of Education to cooperate in estab- 
lishing a multi-million-dollar child 
development research and demon- 
stration center. 

Research and development are 
important phases of several pro- 
grams already under way: 

• The Governor's School at Win- 
ston-Salem, a summer enrichment 
program for academically talented 
and gifted students 

• The Advancement School at 
Winston-Salem, which is experiment- 
ing with various approaches de- 
signed to stimulate the progress of 
underachievers 

• The Comprehensive School Im- 
provement Project, a massive demon- 
stration of new approaches in the 
education of children at the primary 
level. 

• The Durham School Improve- 
ment Center, a model program of 
early education designed to help over- 
come the educational handicaps of 
culturally disadvantaged children 

• The Project on Small High 
Schools, aimed at finding ways in 
which educational opportunities for 
students in smaller schools can be 
equalized, as far as possible, with 
those afforded students in larger 
schools 

It is to be expected that these 
and other experimental and devel- 
opmental programs will yield re- 
sults which eventually will benefit 
every public school student. First- 
hand experience and acquaintance 
with successful innovations can 
contribute immeasurably to the 
confidence of teachers and admin- 
istrators, paving the way for more 
imaginative approaches to solving 
well-recognized problems. 



QaJU and Qneedosn 

A recent opinion issued by the 
North Carolina Attorney General's 
office once again points up the is- 
sue of reasonable standards for 
students' attire and behavior. This 
time, it was Beatle-type haircuts 
and beatnik attire that called for 
reassertion of the principle that 
school officials have the right and 
responsibility to establish and en- 
force such reasonable standards. 

Apparently, not a few students 
and parents regard any such regu- 
lations as an infringement of in- 
dividual freedom and an attempt 
to perpetuate sheer conformity. 
Curiously enough, they sometimes 
buttress their complaints with the 
declaration that the fads in ques- 
tion have gained widespread accep- 
tance. 

There is no doubt that certain 
regulations regulating to attire and 
conduct might be considered un- 
duly repressive by a goodly num- 
ber of the members of a school 
community. However, this fact is 
not a valid argument for the posi- 
tion that school officials have no 
"right" to draw the line when and 
where they find it necessary. There 
may well be varying opinions as to 
exactly what constitutes discourte- 
ous behavior, but this does not 
amount to an argument for allow- 
ing discourteous behavior. 

"Authority" has become a popu- 
lar bugaboo word. There are, of 
course, various ways of asserting 
authority; generally, it need not be 
done in an offensively officious 
manner. Firmness and tactfulness 
are not essentially opposed. 

When it does come to a conflict 
between certain individuals' inter- 
pretation of what should be per- 
mitted and the assertion of author- 
ity, principle is on the side of the 
principal — and the teacher, the 
superintendent, and the board of 
education. The principle is prac- 
tically supported by the fact that 
those who are in authority are 
generally more responsible than 
those who initiate fads; they are 
far more likely to understand that 
freedom and social order are more 
basically related than freedom and 
fashion. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 






100 More Tar Heel Schools Join CSIP Program This Year 



North Carolina's Comprehen- 
sive School Improvement Project 
is moving ahead this year, intro- 
ducing in 100 more schools across 
the State a number of new instruc- 
tional approaches and organiza- 
tional patterns that could "upset 
the status quo" in classrooms 
throughout the country. 

Dr. Lester P. Nelson, education- 
al consultant with the Ford Found- 
ation, made this prediction about 
the eventual impact of the CSIP 
at a meeting of teachers, super- 
visors, school administrators, and 
college consultants involved in the 
project at Raleigh June 11-12. 

He has been serving as consul- 
tant for the project, which is fi- 
nanced by a $2 million Ford Foun- 
dation grant and matching funds 
allocated by the State Board of 
Education, since its planning 
stages. 

Features of Value 

Dr. Nelson particularly cited 
the "comprehensiveness" and the 
coordination of the efforts being 
undei'taken through the CSIP as 
contributing heavily to the proj- 
ect's value. 

Another speaker at the June 
meeting, Dr. Robert H. Anderson 
of Harvard's School of Education, 
seconded Dr. Nelson's assessment 
of the program's groundbreaking 
significance. Many accepted prac- 
tices in elementary education "no 
longer make sense," he declared, 
including the self-contained class- 
room, grading practices, forcing 
children to proceed all at the same 
pace, and requiring all children 
to begin instruction in reading at 
about the same age. 

Scope of Program 

Dr. Woodrow Sugg, director of 
the Comprehensive School Im- 
provement Project, explained that 
the 193 schools participating in 
the program (initiated last year 
in 93 schools) are employing vari- 
ous combinations of techniques 
and methods designed to improve 
instruction at the primary level. 
These approaches include non- 
graded organization, team teach- 
ing, cooperative teaching, use of 



teachers' aides, large group in- 
struction, and special reading in- 
struction for beginners. 

An idea of the scope and ration- 
ale of the CSIP is afforded by a 
status report recently prepared 
by Dr. Frank C. Emmerling and 
K. Z. Chavis, assistant directors 
of the Project: 

At present, some 800 teachers 
and teachers' aides, 193 princi- 
pals, 80 college consultants, 111 
superintendents, and 150 super- 
visors are involved in the project, 
which serves approximately 17,000 
primary school children through- 
out the State. 

During the past summer, Sum- 
mer Readiness Programs coordi- 
nated with the CSIP programs 
were conducted in 113 schools. 
These summer pre-school pro- 
grams were designed to enhance 
the chances for culturally disad- 
vantaged children to succeed in 
their first year of school. 

Basic Assumptions 

The massive demonstration 
project is "based on the belief 
. . . that professional educators, 
working within local school situa- 
tions, are capable of planning, im- 
plementing, and evaluating pro- 
grams designed to improve learn- 
ing opportunities for children," 
the report states. "The rationale 
underlying the project acknowl- 
edges that varying local conditions 
require considerable latitude and 
flexibility in the overall program 
to allow for specific approaches 
to accomplish the major objec- 
tive." 

Special emphasis is being placed 
on improving instruction in lan- 
guage arts and mathematics. In 
selecting the project schools, pri- 
ority was given to those having 
large numbers of culturally dis- 
advantaged children enrolled. 

Media Utilized 

Development of differential pro- 
grams requires a greater variety 
of instructional materials and sup- 
plies, so each group of three 
teachers and their aide is provid- 
ed $640 to supplement the normal 
budget in this area. 



To encourage the use of the 
latest types of audiovisual equip- 
ment and other instructional aids 
in the classroom, each of the 
teacher groups has been allocated 
$860 for such equipment. 

Plans are being made to utilize 
educational television in the CSIP 
program, with a series of live and 
taped programs for primary-age 
children to be produced under the 
direction of the State Television 
Education staff. 

In-Service Education 

In-service education is necessar- 
ily an important phase of the pro- 
gram. Numerous conferences and 
workshops have been conducted 
and are being planned, including 
two series of workshops on the 
use of audiovisual aids and educa- 
tional TV. One innovation in this 
area is the provision of release 
time to allow teachers and admin- 
istrators to visit other schools for 
classroom observation and ex- 
change of information. 

To facilitate a partnership be- 
tween the participating public 
schools and colleges and universi- 
ties engaging in programs of 
teacher education, more than 20 
public and private colleges are 
making it possible for professors 
to serve as consultants to CSIP 
schools on a contractual basis. 

Newsletter Initiated 

An important development this 
year is the publication of SPEAR- 
HEAD, CSIP newsletter, initiated 
in September. 

This attractively-designed publi- 
cation, prepared and edited by the 
CSIP staff, is intended to serve as 
a medium for the exchange of in- 
formation, and suggestions, and a 
review of developments in the local 
school programs. 

"Judging by the response to the 
first issue," said Dr. Emmerling, 
''SPEARHEAD will fill a real need 
and serve as an effective means of 
communication. Exchange of in- 
formation is especially vital in a 
large-scale experimental program, 
and we are counting on contribu- 
tions from CSIP participants to 
enhance its effectiveness." 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Educational TV Station at Columbia Goes on Air 
As Newest Link in Projected State-wide Network 



WUNB-TV at Columbia in Tyr- 
rell County, the second station in 
North Carolina's projected State- 
wide educational television net- 
work, went on the air Sept. 15 with 
a 45-minute live telecast of the 
station's dedication ceremony. 

The new station, which will be 
linked by microwave relay with 
WUNC-TV, Channel 4, Chapel Hill, 
beams its broadcasts over a 60-mile 
radius in the Northeastern sector 
of the State on Channel 2 from 
a 1,041-foot transmitter tower on 
U. S. 64 about six miles from Co- 
lumbia. 

It is the first of four new TV 
transmitters authorized by the 
1963 General Assembly. The others 
are to be located at Asheville, Con- 
cord, and Linville. 

Dedication Speakers 

John Young, director of tele- 
vision for the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, presided 
at the dedication. Young told the 
audience that the new station will 
broadcast for several weeks Mon- 
day through Friday from 9 a.m. to 
12:30 p.m. and from 7 to 10 p.m. 
After the microwave relay station 
at Plymouth goes into operation, 
the broadcasts will be scheduled 
from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 5 to 10 
p.m. weekdays, and 3 to 10 p.m. 
Sundays, he said. 

Speakers for the dedication in- 
cluded William C. Friday, presi- 
dent of the Consolidated Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Fred H. 
Weaver, vice-president for admin- 
istration, UNC ; John R. B. Hawes, 
supervisor of Television Educa- 
tion, State Department of Public 
Instruction ; Alan B. Mclntyre, 
director of engineering, WUNC- 
TV; Emil W. Young Jr., director 
of television, UNC at Greensboro, 
and Jack Porter, director of tele- 
vision, N. C. State University at 
Raleigh. 

'A Vital Link' 

Speakers representing the re- 
gion served by the facility includ- 
ed Tyrrell County Representative 
W. J. White of Columbia; Wash- 
ington County Rep. Carl Bailey, 
Jr. of Plymouth, and former State 
Sen. N. Elton Aydlett of Elizabeth 



City, one of the sponsors of the 
1963 legislation appropriating 
funds for the educational TV net- 
work. 

Other legislators attending the 
ceremony included Beaufort Sen. 
Ashley Futrell, Bertie Rep. Em- 
mett Burden and Hyde Rep. W. J. 
Lupton. 

President Friday termed the 
new station "a vital link . . . be- 
tween the East and the rest of the 
State, so all North Carolinians 
may know each other and our State 
better." Weaver declared that 
"this new station becomes the fifth 
campus of the University." 

Reps. White and Bailey ob- 
served that the station will bring 
long-denied cultural benefits to 
citizens of the Northeastern area. 
"It will open the doors of a great 
storehouse of information which 
the central section of the State 
has long enjoyed," Aydlett com- 
mented. 

Production Tour 

In preparation for the exten- 
sion of educational television to 
the area, a number of special pro- 
grams were taped by a WUNC-TV 
production group in August dur- 
ing a 12-day tour of the Albemarle 
area. These programs were de- 
signed to further acquaintance of 
viewers in the Channel 4 area with 
various phases of the history, cul- 
ture, and resources of the Albe- 
marle area, as well as to give the 
area's residents a view of them- 
selves on TV. 

The production tour began with 
a stop at Edenton, then moved on 
to Elizabeth City and Manteo, 
then to Plymouth and the Wash- 
ington-Bath area. 

John Young, WUNC-TV studio 
director, was chairman of the tour 
and Alan McBryde was in charge 
of the engineering. Coordinators 
for the points on the itinerary 
were Charles Braswell of the 
Chapel Hill studio, Hyman Field 
of the Raleigh studio, Roger 
Koonce of Chapel Hill; Dr. Jack 
Porter, director of the Raleigh 
studio, and Emil Young, director 
of the Greensboro studio. 



Governors Back Proposals 
Advanced by Terry Sanford 

Former Governor Terry San- 
ford in recent weeks again has 
captured national headlines be- 
cause of his suggestions for co- 
operative interstate approaches to 
improving education. 

At the National Governor's Con- 
ference in Minneapolis during the 
summer, Sanford proposed and the 
Conference unanimously approved 
the concept that the states form a 
compact for education. 

"Such a compact," Sanford elab- 
orated, "would not have authority 
to set policy but would be a means 
of developing alternatives for pol- 
icy decisions. It would furnish the 
states with the best available in- 
formation ; it would suggest ap- 
propriate goals; it would serve to 
exchange information and to ad- 
vise; and, of great significance, it 
would provide the states with a 
forum for sharing experiences, im- 
proving standards, and debating 
goals." 

During the summer Sanford was 
also in the spotlight as a major 
participant in the White House 
Conference, directed by John W. 
Gardner, recently appointed Sec- 
retary of Health, Education, and 
Welfare. At this national conclave, 
Sanford stressed that educational 
and political leaders must cooper- 
ate more effectively if education is 
to be adequately improved. 

Addressing 650 leaders from 
throughout the Nation, Sanford 
stated, "While it is true that the 
political life is not going to flour- 
ish without an ever-increasing 
educational undergirding, it is 
also a fact that education can 
barely exist without political sup- 
port." 

During the Conference, Sanford 
also addressed a luncheon meeting 
at which he re-emphasized the 
challenges which now face the 
states in terms of improving edu- 
cation. 

Currently, Sanford is supervis- 
ing a study financed by the Carne- 
gie Corporation entitled "A Study 
of the American States," a project 
concerned partly with the atti- 
tudes of states toward educational 
problems. Headquarters for this 
study are at Duke University. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Randolph County Teachers 
First- Phase of Pilot Project 

More than 400 teachers in the 
Randolph County administrative 
unit, responsible for 11,300 stu- 
dents, participated in a two-week 
in-service training program prior 
to the opening of the 1965-66 
school term for the purpose of 
planning and preparing for suc- 
cessful school desegregation. 

The project was financed 
through a grant of more than 
$157,000 from the U. S. Office of 
Education, according to Superin- 
tendent Lacy M. Presnell, Jr., and 
will continue as a pilot project in 
North Carolina for the ensuing 
school year. 

Objectives of Project 

Specific objectives of this in- 
service approach to successful 
school desegregation were "to ac- 
quaint teachers, principals, and 
stag members with the socio-eco- 
nomic, educational, and cultural 
backgrounds of all students who 
will attend the desegregated 
schools of Randolph County in or- 
der that an effective program be 
planned; and to aid teachers in 
acquiring knowledge, techniques, 
and procedures necessary for 
teaching in the desegregated 
schools." 

Another objective of this in- 
service project was to acquaint the 
public with pertinent facts con- 
cerning the desegregation of 
schools and to urge citizens to 
work with the superintendent in 
identifying problems arising out 
of the new organization and in im- 
plementing processes which will 
make for an orderly transition 
from a segregated organization to 
an integrated one. 

Workshop Technique 

This emphasis on problems in 
human relations was implemented 
through lectures, discussions, spe- 
cial readings, small group confer- 
ences, dual planning, and other 
democratic workshop techniques. 

Among the major topics explored 
during the two-week workshop 
were the following: orientation of 
faculty in each of desegregated 
schools; a study of socio-economic 
factors existing in the community; 
availability of community re- 
sources; analysis of achievement 



Take Part in Workshop, 
on Desegregation 

levels of all students; educational 
media available for implementing 
a desegregated program; teaching 
techniques in a multi-ethnic or- 
ganization; organizing the social 
studies program in a newly organ- 
ized desegregated school; increas- 
ing community interest in school 
attendance; and extracurricular 
activities involving students from 
different backgrounds. 

Project Staff 

James R. Coggins, assistant su- 
perintendent, served as director of 
the education workshop; he was 
assisted by W. K. Cromartie, Mary 
K. Ellis, Barbara C. Rains, and 
Nancy B. Yow of the Randolph 
administrative and supervisory 
staff. Dr. Cameron West of Pfeiffer 
College served as consultant. 
Other consultants during the 
training session included person- 
nel from the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation and the State Department 
of Public Instruction. 

Of the 18 schools in Randolph 
County, where Negro population is 
eight percent of the total, 15 will 
have desegregated staffs, with 
from one to four Negro teachers 
in each of these schools. One 
school will have no Negro stu- 
dents next year. 



Retired Superintendent 
Of Pender Schools Dies 

T. T. Murphy, 82, who served 
for 53 years as Pender County's 
superintendent of schools prior to 
his retirement in 1959, died Sept. 
8 in Pender Memorial Hospital. 

A native of Pender County, he 
was a life member of the North 
Carolina Education Association. He 
had served as secretary of the Pen- 
der County Board of Health and 
was a member of the Pender Coun- 
ty Welfare Board. He was an elder 
of the Burgaw Presbyterian Church 
and was secretary of the King Solo- 
mon Masonic Lodge No. 138 at 
Burgaw. 

He is survived by his wife and 
two daughters. 



Moore Voters Okay Merger 
Of County's School Units 

Moore County voters on Oct. 2 
approved consolidation of the 
Southern Pines, Pinehurst, and 
Moore County school administra- 
tive units, apparently resolving a 
long-standing controversy over 
the proposal. The unofficial vote 
tally was 3,386 in favor and 2,462 
opposed. 

Legislation authorizing the ref- 
erendum on the merger as well as 
on a uniform countywide tax levy 
of 30 cents per $100 valuation was 
enacted by the 1965 General As- 
sembly. 

Injunction Declined 

Judge Allen H. Gwyn of Reids- 
ville had declined to grant an in- 
junction against the holding of 
the special election after a hearing 
held Sept. 23. Validity and consti- 
tutionality of the Act authorizing 
the vote had been attacked in a 
taxpayers' suit instituted Sept. 13 
by J. D. Hobbs of Southern Pines 
and Dr. J. C. Grier of Pinehurst. 
Attorneys for the Pinehurst and 
Southern Pines city units had ar- 
gued against the referendum. 

Voters in the four precincts 
covering Southern Pines and Pine- 
hurst voted against the merger 
proposals by a margin of more 
than three to one, while county 
voters heavily approved the move. 
Levy Defeated 

The proposed tax supplement 
was defeated by a vote of 2,939 to 
2,827. Under terms of the legisla- 
tion, this will not affect the mer- 
ger of the units. 

The Southern Pines and Pine- 
hurst city units have been set up 
separately from the county unit 
since 1937. The two city boards 
had resisted merger with the coun- 
ty unit, proposing instead a con- 
solidation of the two city units. 
The Moore Board of Commission- 
ers declined to approve the latter 
plan. 

The legislation authorizing the 
vote requires that a seven-member 
city-county board of education be 
appointed by the county commis- 
sioners within 60 days and that 
an election of board members be 
held in April 1967. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Community Colleges Staff Conference Focuses 
On Planning of Science Programs, Facilities 



Heretofore uniquely American, 
the concept of the community col- 
lege as "democracy's college" is 
now being "exported all over the 
world," a leading Midwestern ed- 
ucator declared in his address at 
the opening session of the Pro- 
fessional Staff Development Con- 
ference sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges. 

Dr. Joseph P. Cosand, President 
of the St. Louis Junior College 
District spoke to an audience of 
more than 250 staff members of 
community colleges, technical in- 
stitutes, and industrial education 
centers, assembled at North Caro- 
lina State University for a three- 
day meeting beginning May 31. 

The conference was cosponsored 
by the Department of Industrial 
Education of N. C. State Univer- 
sity and the Fund for the Ad- 
vancement of Education. 

Planning the development of 

science centers for comprehensive 

institutions was the principal 

topic for the second-day sessions. 

'Quality in Diversity' 

"Quality within diversity must 
be the hallmark of the open-door, 
comprehensive community col- 
lege," said Dr. William T. Mooney, 
Jr., dean of the Division of Physi- 
cal Sciences at California's El 
Camino College. "With the wide 
range of programs . . . comes the 
need for extensive guidance, coun- 
seling and testing procedures 
which operate to place students 
in curricula and courses suited to 
their abilities and interests." 

E. Rexford Billings, associate 
dean of the Erie County Technical 
Institute, Buffalo, N. Y. joined 
Mooney in discussions of science- 
related curricula and facilities. 

John M. Reynolds of Asheville, 
chairman of the State Board of 
Education's Community College 
Committee, was the speaker at the 
dinner session. 

Facility Planning 

Another speaker, Wilmington 
architect Leslie N. Boney, Jr., 
president of the N. C. Chapter, 
American Institute of Architects, 
illustrated his remarks with 
color slides of science facilities 

OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



throughout the country. Since sci- 
ence facilities are the most ex- 
pensive units in a community col- 
lege, Boney observed, there is a 
special need for careful planning in 
this area to assure maximum utili- 
zation. 

At the closing session, the edu- 
cators heard John E. Harmon, di- 
rector of manpower development 
and training for the U. S. Chamber 
of Commerce, express concern 
over the apparent desire of some 
administrators of two-year insti- 
tutions to develop them into four- 
year colleges. 

Concerns Voiced 

"I fear that this could very well 
mean the watering down of voca- 
tional-technical education. Every- 
body does not need a college 
degree," Harmon said. 

He also stressed the need for 
counselors at vocational-technical 
centers to become well-acquainted 
with what is taking place in their 
community's business and indus- 
try. 

Dr. Gerald P. James, president 
of Rockingham Community Col- 
lege, presented a summary of the 
group discussions on "Effective 
Administrative and Supervisory 
Practices." 

Dr. I. E. Ready, director of the 
Department of Community Col- 
leges, presided at the opening 
general session. Other personnel 
of the Department taking part in 
the program were Dr. Monroe C. 
Neff, Anthony J. Bevacqua, Dr. 
Gordon B. Pyle, Kenneth Oleson, 
Durwin M. Hanson, John H. Black- 
mon, Samuel Geek, and Ivan Val- 
entine. 

Hayes Named to New Post 

Donald G. Hayes, former con- 
sultant in Education for the Ex- 
ceptionally Talented, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, 
has been named administrative as- 
sistant to the director of the North 
Carolina Advancement School. 
Hayes had been serving as direc- 
tor of admissions for the school at 
Winston-Salem. 



School Boards Association 
Taps Erwin as Executive 

Clyde A. Erwin, Jr. of Chapel 
Hill has been appointed executive 
secretary of the North Carolina 
State School Boards Association, 
succeeding Dr. R. Max Abbott, who 
resigned the post this summer to 
become superintendent of Kinston 
City Schools. 

Announcement of Erwin's ap- 
pointment was made early in Sep- 
tember by Joe Pell, president of 
the Association. 

Erwin, son of the former State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, has served during the past 
year as part-time instructor in the 
School of Education at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill and has done advanced gradu- 
ate work in school administration. 

Previously, he was coordinator of 
school-community relations for the 
Fairfax County Schools in Virgin- 
ia. 

In 1957, Erwin joined the staff 
of the North Carolina Education 
Association as field secretary, and 
in 1959, he was appointed legisla- 
tive consultant for the Southeast- 
ern region with the National Edu- 
cation Association. 

Educated in the public schools of 
Raleigh, Erwin received both his 
undergraduate and master's de- 
grees from North Carolina State 
College. 

He is married to the former 
Emily Castelow of Aulander. They 
have four children. 

Taylor, McDonald Assume 

New Administrative Posts 

Woodrow Taylor, superintendent 
of Brunswick County Schools since 
July 1, 1963, has been named super- 
intendent of Hamlet City Schools, 
succeeding Maylon McDonald, who 
had accepted appointment as assist- 
ant superintendent of Fayetteville 
City Schools. Both assumed their 
new duties Oct. 1. 

McDonald succeeded Dr. Willard 
S. Swiers in the Fayetteville post. 
Swiers is now superintendent of 
Chapel Hill City Schools. 



k 



Non.fr Carolina 



Library 



Raleigh 



in 
so 
o\ 



CQ 

O 

H 

u 

o 






^« 

£ M g 
^£ 

r COM 

So 
p 



(A 



■^ o 

c *- 

o en 
E .E 

Q s. 

o. .2 

3 o 

*■ c 
CJ .- 

° o 

u 

c c 
o — 

* "2 
2 ° 

Qu U 
QJ Q> 



>. 
CO 





H 














C.E 

8* 


M«t-c>ioootr5oco 




CO C: CO iC 00 00 i— if 




OO^t-iCOCOiOOOCO 




t»HOiOf OOHOD 




KKNttDOOTf f f 




OiOOO^OOCOiOi— I 




£ w 


OO'fftDHiflO 




CM CM t- 00 ■«* CO CO CM 




CVC~COiC0QC0^-(CJ 




5 a 


COWmuOiOcOCOCO 




TJ<■^coco■^ , Tr'^•^ , 




■»^i ^« -^ -^ ^< u^ j_fj ^jt 




O-H 














hi 














to g 














liS 














X 














2 to 

2 5 


iflC. WHOONt- 




O'fl't'lMHNCCO 




■^wmeoOHiaf 




■^caoc/D-^fcjirao 




CI OOCO^ MHO) 




f Mi- IHOOOX 




H | 


C0t-00t-t-QOO 




QCCJGlC>f-i.-«CM(M 




CKDffOOOwW 




H 




HHHH 








OS 




























■o 














V 














w 














p 












>% 


o 


i-HOOOf-COCMtOCS 




COfOHNlOWtD 




ftiftOWOOf rtiO 


JLi 


h 


CI Ci Ci lO W O H w 


>> 

u 
a 


lOWNHTfQOfH 




tJcOH(X!OCOQW 


d 


Pl, 


MN^MMWO© 


CSi-H^-^m-^f-O 




co^ot-oocr-coco 




HNNMWNWM 




CCCCC0C0MCC'* , ^ 


+^ 












s 


"3 




TS 




(4 




CD 
S 

0/ 


e 




c 
o 
u 

04 




O 

E-i 




w 


c 




CO 










01 


HOOO^iOMNW 




CPiOMHt-OOt- 




f HHiONWOON 




E 


OOHOiOWON 




coooincoocMWO 




OiOI>COCM"'3*©CM 




© 


WHrnMHco-^io 




OONNM'MfCf 




NHHi^tflCHpJ 












NCM(NNOJN«CO 




c 


ONNWH01^"f 




MNf OlOiflffiG 




NfffiMWrJieOCO 




V 


M me- m f i> « h 




01 lOWOOf HHH 




iO^COCO^GjOOCO 




s 






QOHHOHHM 




ONCCCONtNtNM 




■o 














u 














*J 














a 














3 














"O 














a 














CJ 


f-ooch©»-ic\]eo-i" 




MMftOHNMt 




h-OOftOHNM^i 




ifitO'ftCD<£coc^te 




irti/?iococctococo 




mmLi^cctc^te 




a 
S 

i- 


~. oi r. ~. ~, ci ~ ~- 




OOCftdCiCTlffJ^ 




Oiciftaifflooisi 















-~ o3 



CO 
*• CD 



43 



CO T3 

43 * 

o w 

03 CD 

0) bo 



w in 

2 "* 

43 CO 

£2 



°> « o 

. CO «J 
«H I 03 



O 'S 



^2 +» 



W iS 

(a a 



3 oo 



lO 

o 

I 

to 



t3 



03 03 
03 S 
^ bO 



^ s 

0) 
O CO 



.a <u 

O 
J-l S 

o o 



>5 



to 

so 






» o 



E-i £ 

• "3 
> 

o3 



0> rff rC 



s o 



.rt 03 

S 03 O 
03 



«H 



O) W 

E-i ^ bo 

<D O 

-(-I o 



e 8 

„° s 

o o o 

rt Iz; o 

o M 

r/i o ~ 

O 00 i—l 



■. bo 1 

S fl 3 

o 2 'O 

55 I § 

■g ^ 

° bmo 

CO „ <^ 

03 g --I 

a" ° rt " 

C *H h 

O 0! 0) 

•43 ft,Q 

^ =4-1 £ 

S 1 o i) 



O 
CO 

3-. 



CO 

W 

< 

a 

H 

W 
H 
< 

co 
■ 

fa 

C 

H 
P 
C 

tf 

c 

fc. 

p 

- 

fa 
p 



















V 
















































£00 


a to 


■^ 


CJ 00 


r- 


CO lO 






u «*!, 


10 -rr 


LO 


t- CM 


co 


CM CO 


cc 


CM lO r 


« ? 


00 





CO 10 


TJ- 


*<* -^ 


■^ 


to 00 t 


" 3 

































0) 
































X - 




















t— 


fc- 










•O 1 


U3 CM 


r» 


f- CO 




CO CM 








CM i-l 


CO 


CO CM 


CO 








































ba 
















O 






























•d 
















3 S3 

E 


O^ 


-« 


OS b- 


•J 


CO CO 




et- 


(O i-H 


f- 


-^ ^* 


_. 


c- ** 




i-O. 3-. 


CO CO 




t* f- 


-r 


CO 10 


-. 


co r- : 


H 4- 


CM r-i 


co 




■^r 


CM i-H 


CO 


CM iH 


fi 


























bo 










c _ 










•S B8 












>■ 


>> 


>. 


b. 




i ^ 


t- >> 


fc h 




« 1- 




« k. 


H 


12 « — 






§•§ « 


S" "3 


F,* 13 a 


C-o k 




£ 


«c 5 


^ s -2 


2 c 




goo 


E 


E . 




41 ^J H 


« g H 


n«H 


£ « ! 














Hcfi 


W^J 


K'/. 


wco d 








CO 






to 






<o 


« 










-= « 






eq 








C£> 


CO 






03 


c. 








^ 


rt 





















" "3 

a> S 

bo cr 
a> 

S3 bo 

O S3 

«-j3 

03 a> 

s| 

o *Q 

U S3 

m 03 



CJ 

03 

o 

03 

O "03 



CD 



T3 

ai 



0) 

cu 

^3 
-(J 

C bo 



00 1 

h C 

CD o 

o 

+J CO 



u -4 r ft 

CJ " 0) 

oco M 

43 CD 

a> ai 



S.5 
Sg 

03 

rn"CJ 



43 te ^S 

o S3 .SP ■ 

2f to 



CJ 1^ 

43 <j, 

bO 43 



s w 



bo!^ cc - 



«T3 
43 £ 
Sh "cj 

cu a 

St 

o 



P< bo 

P. c 
3 '£ 

CO H 

3 

C bo 

s 

43 oj 
* ^ ' 

bC 



O ^43 

2 «« 2 

43 rrt 03 

O J 0) 

CO § -H 

^ co cu 

cos 
oj co co 

S °^ 

cp CO 03 j 



in S3 

■<* o3 

CO 



73 
rn" S3 

co 03 
U 



u 



'S c 1 - 

C S 
o3 3 



S7 

bO o 

CD o 

33 a> 

O ?H 

° 03 

ni 

S3 



H o °* 



O 
ft 

u 9> 

03 ^ 



co 03 

O 00 

K CD 

CD r- 

CO "3 

03 

10 CD 

CO 4J 

1 

'Cf CD 



.a 4= 

CD 

43 o 



in ^ 

3 

h CD 
CD >> 

43 

S 3 
3 O 

C > 
OJ CD 

£ ft 
U CD 

CD 43 



CD O 
CO «H 

03 „ 



+3 


IO 


(3 


co 


rt 




CJ 


t 


cp 


co 




Cj 


fi 


iH 


to 




K 


y 

43 




+^ 


a; 




43 


C 



co- 



03 



S3 
CD - 

a 
o c 

O 

CO CJ 



-S m o3 

a- a c 
a m o 

CO 

5~ O P 

1 ft£ 

CO . c f-l 
> 

^ b c 

03 3 o 

.3 w « 



"g jS T? bo-s 00 



1 c 3 



"5 03 

CD 43 

^ _, 

. CD 
3 > 

2 S3 



_ 3 
O T3 > 03 .O 



43 -3 



^■3 



.5 s 

CD 

73 co .3 



3 
3 42 



CD 03 



3 543 



ft U CO 



co 
co bo 

43 .S 
Eh X3 
3 



03 a Q 
Z e 40 



C/2 o 

« 3 

CO *H 

CD +-> 

CJ CO 

CD CJ 

co 3 



C co 
CD 42 
CD O 

fa . 

3 

pl]-2 

^ CO 

^;> 
.0 

Li 
P CD 

43 



O c3 Si CD 

ft ft^ -S 

CD 4) — ' +J 



43 * 
+3 3 

s ^ 

£l 

CO o 

- 

43 

O Sh 

03 CD 

CD 42 



3 CD 

CD CO 

CD 03 

42 CD 



CO ft 

.5 

CD a3 

co bo 

LO 03 

CO bo 

1 3 
"<P CD 
CD " 

CI co 



2 >> 

3 42 



H S3 



03 
43 

"9 S 

^ft 

"3 cM 
3 CM 
3 



CD ^3 
43 CD 



co 3 

H 73 

03 3 
CD O 
>> CJ 



T3 
CD 

CJ u=| 

3 . - 



03 .S 



Li I* 

O CO 

's 00 

CD CO 

CO CT> 



■^ E 



O -C 
03 bO 
CD -3 
-1^ 43 



o 

43 
+a 

bO . 
3 TS 
'3 CD 

3 O 
T2 3 



< 

3 
O 

c 
o 



CD 

3 

i- 3 

0) 1-5 

<y o 

42 

s 



^ 

J S > 



0) 
-2 



bo >> 
S3 £ 

!s ° 

- Li CD 
O 32 

5> 

3 CD 

o3 43 

co 



§-' 



O 
u 

c 

3 
£ 






CD 

03 5 



.12 

'5) 





> 

-£ 
to 

< 



2 "w 
bo ° 
« 3 

O 
T3 '43 
« 03 

«2 

03 4^ 

C 2 
CD CO 

3 

m o 
<-i cj 



3 5 

3 

O 

O - 

CD 

42 

s 

O 
CJ 

S3 
3 

T3 
3 ' 
P3 



■•r 



at 



w 
W 
H 
<J 
P 
Q 
<< 

cs 

o 

o 

H 
O 

p 

Q 

« 

H 
X 
u 

w 









coMnOHMinoot-mrtm^N'fceM 


tP 


t- 








CO ,-h CO <M i-h 00 00 i-n-H OHfC-H 




t- 


c - 










c- 




+ 




1 + 1 +++++ 1 + 1 1 ++ 1 ++ 


+ 


+ 


U^ 


















OONO , * wH Oa3000WiOCOrfiOCOO 


© 


IC 








CO C- t-W^^iOiOtfiW^iM^HOOt-H 


CO 


c- 








rH CO "5 i-i rH NHCO lO 






i-H 












W 






M00 00 Mffl , ? T l , Ot"®«t-H05|>C5'ON 


lO 


t-H 


CO 






M^^tccOHtCMifltCWOO 1 ^ 0> (M W 


t- 


oi 


O) 






i-H CO^hH W i-l CO lO 


tr- 


CO 




















OiOO l> .rr-«50'-<ic , ^ , ^'coCTit- u:i ' r *'0'-<ift 


ia 


t- 








CO"* cOHOC'OcCOt-C'J^O'- 1 tCiOCO 


CO 


co 


CI 






r>J CO r-i r-H i-l i-I CO |-i "^ 
























Nt-inO«HtOoOOt-01>flCO T 'N050« 


tM 


Xj 








*3<CO_j'rJii-HTjHi-<r r -LOcO »0 rq G5 lOO 




r- 
















T— t 






C4 


CO 




t- 












V 












X 


eft 










o 


u 












•OJS 


« s 

M m -2 

3.2,22 « 

M E~ c S S> 


d 




c 
© 


H 

"o 


« 2 


c 




« 


o 


e 


3 B 5 < 5 „ a .a 
css B B C 2 m "° 

£S bS J S^^'-5 w 2 


e 


- 


3 


CO 


o — 


X 


< 


h 

0H 

IH 
O 

a 
>> 
H 


h 
c 
£ 



u 


Secondary S 
Special Subj 
(A 
Agricult 
Art 
Bible 
Biology 
Chemist 
Commer 
English 
Foreign 
Home E 
Industri 
Library 
Mathem 
Music 
Physical 
Physics 
Science 
Social S 
Others 


7J 

i- 

-o 
c 
o 
u 

M 


O 
H 

Q 
Pi 



a 

<i 
o 

M 
P 
Cu 

S* 

ffl 

oo 
CS 
W 

ffi 

o 

-1 
w 

Eh 

fcn 
O 

[H 

J 

ft 

ft 
p 

CO 

I 



3& 



COIr-coiftir-i-"ftC] 

rHCT3t--<xtcoaitr-t^ 

cocO'^-rrcO'<* , ^ , in) 



OOOOOOOHM^t- 
CO lO lO rf -^ (D t- H 



IftOOCOt-OOOlCliC 
CO-^tr-OOOOi— ICOH 
OlTjHCOm"*t-00iO 



iraireiocDto<o<*co 

cncicnovo)Cf>c>o 



■a 

© 



3 




W 

© 



© 

© 

> 

c 
© 

01 

© 



S 3 

3 O 

rQ 

S- << 
CD ^ 
> 



03 S 
•r-i O 

o u 



11) fi ID D 
J3 O^^! 



o ^3 



to 
c 



3 

a> 
■7! -^ 

o +J 
■o a> 

CO TS 



^1 

73 O 

a> o 

rrj i-H 

> 
o <« 



^ CQ 

o w 

o S 

iO 3 
iH O 
»3- O 



H -> *0 



cp 3 

II 

3 

T3 3 

3 «H 

!l 

O "H 

O ^ 

r3 CD 

3 






cu 3 3 .S 



c "te 



CQ 



5 | 

rt 3 



O) 



P » o 

^ " H «H 

C 73 

(D CD CQ 

> > T3 
15 O 3 
m 5h O 

■S ^3 

> 73 """ 

>j 3 o 
+s C3 o 

^^ 

,3 «3 ° 

® Q. 8 

H P< p| 

<i CD C3 
^3 3 



3 3 

,Q CD 

t3 

-(J 
t< CQ 

°o 

C3 CD 

O +> 

cS 

CQ 73 

3 o 

~~ s 

93 O 

CQ O 



M 

CO 

■8.9 

3ffi 

o AJ 

CQ CD 

S 6 



■P o 

g n3 

- s 

o bo 

1 ^3 
CO 
CM -g 

03 CD 

- «J 

3 CD 

O Sh 

73 



3 
o 
u 

CD 
3 
cd 

»H 

O 

fi ~" 

.2 o 

+3 o 

o ,3 

3 O 
fi CO 

CO ,£3 

3 bfl 
§2 



73 3 

CD CO 
CD 

O CO 



3 >> 

co 5 

O ,3 
^5 bo 



CD -P 

rQ 

73 o3 
co O 



3 



<!s 



1-5 M 



1-3 •" 



H CD 

t3 CQ 

3 cC 

cd a 

3 CD 



CD -J +> 

S O CD 

°- bo 

•Hffl Jj 

O (M J2 

Ci 

CO CD 

O ■£ ,3 

O 3 +j 

o 

^3 tf oj 

co C 73 

P CD 

S 2 3 

73 r3 m 

O « i> 

5 co 73 



73 
CD 



8 M 

fl-H co 



£ I 



CD 



sW 



2 - ; 

SgJ 

-- 



5°.- 



tf 
US' 

* s 

IS 



cS 
CD 

u 

CD 

5 



CD 

bo 
cC 

-M 

3 

CD ■ 
O 
In 

CD 



".I 

- 



3 

CD 

_ CJ 

ft !h 

CD 

co rv 

• I-H "^ 

^ ta 

cS fe 

r3 O 



T3 
>j, OS 

S 1 bo 

3 lO 

(C CO 

C5S 

t3 rH 
CD 

■+J CD 
c3 ,3 
ft +» 

^ g 

cci «H 



£ £ 



<D rH 

o 



CD jj 

c w ^> 

CD I 1 

73 _CS >ih 

3 'cj 73 

C4 CD CD 

CQ CO « 

Jh o 



S»t 



,3 5 ~ 

O) S. c 

*" gel 

fc'g « 

C3 g U 
+j O CD 



CQ 



CO >> 

CD 03 

r3 73 

03 o Sh 
CD O CD 

co 

>, a 

Sh C CD 



S* 5 o 

e c » 

i— c Si 3 

0) CD w 

ft 



e« 



5» 

CO o 



"3 w Q 

CD ^ 
CJ 

a> 3 3 

ft o3 o3 



01 

u 

s 



OS 



>> e x 






CQ 73 CQ 

fl s 2? 

"3 c3 bC 

CS w CD 

S >>:=: 

0) Q, o 

S-i S? 1 CD 

^ ft 

ra 3 ^> 

C3 « S 

3 3 X 

O —i O 

03 - ^h 

CD £ 03 

o O 

« 3 o 

^ w , 

o3 -Q 73 

fi o u 
§^ S 

CD 3 CD 

« CO 



5 s 

3 3 

CD 

CD i-H 



O 

o 

r3 

co 'O 

CD 

T3 

>1 1> 

Sh CD 

a 3 



ft~ 
o 
o 

<D ,3 
^h o 

o3 co 



U CD 

CD +-> 

£ 03 

o > 

o3 -3 

5 ft 



+3 bo 

3 3 
03 '3 



•_, co 



^3 



3 T3 
O O 
o '— 
ft' 

r*> CQ 



CD 00 
,3 CO 

73 p-i 
3 * 
rt o3 >> 



ft o '2 



8 s 

CO rg 

03 

o 

<4-H 



CD 

bo 
o3 CD 



3 CD 
03 ^j 

CD 

"O CD 
CD -P 



3 3 
.2 ft 

03 3 

^ 3 
O 

cd '43 

r3 CD 

73 

• O 



O 
CO o 

.S W 

03 "J 

S^ 

CD 3 
h ft 



g 2 « 

ft ft p 

CM 

<^ co 

CD CD 

r? bo^ 



a aj 2 



CD 



to 



CD 

.3 
,2 -=i 

CD P 



2 o 

CJ W 



CD 



O 

S > U 

ft ,u u 

ft rH CD 

03 ft ft 



3 

03 <^ 



•rH \£> 
CO 

3 Tj< 

03 co 

r3 05 



2 'p, co 

"i-H >-v ^s 



3 O 

ca 



s 2 a 

r3 <H 

O O . 

H-> o3 X' 

C5 CD rv 
-t-> _u >— l 



■ — i +j I— I 



Ui 



o 
o u 



rS-g 

O CD 
03 U 
CD CD 



CD 



oi 



M 



"^ CO CD 

3 «H ^ 
.S O CJ 

1° O 

^ fS ° 

cj kO CO 

co b- o 



bo 
3 

IS 

o 

CD 

CD 

CD 



03 

CD 

bo 

CD . 

O « 
CJ ' 



CO .5 



•rH CD CJ 

"S 9 ,3 



rH ^S W 



+3 rH 

co 2 



O' — * ' — ■ >-> 
rH ft ft P 



3 rH 

o o 



OS 


73 


-M 


■P 


«H 




flj 


OJ 


tfl 


^ 




%-i 


3 


C; 


tw 


rJ 


ft 


3 


■n 




Tl 


CD 




CD 


rt 


3 




ft 






£ 

a; 
-3 


i) 




-p 




+j 


73 

H-> 

co 


CD 

r3 

o 
oj 

CD 
■P 


3 

CD 

£ 


r3 

ft 


c8 

£ 


CD 


01 




a) 


03 

CD 


CD 


05 

'3 


CD 

3 

CD 



'3 CD 
CD O 

O CO 

CD 

aTr? 

2 CD 

O r3 
CO f_, 



rt 


CD 


w 


CJ 






OJ 


CD 


r3 
ft 


£ 
£ 




c 


CO 


CD 


3 




a; 




£ 


>, 




to 



03 CO 



"01 



rt 



CD 

r3 



o3 
P 

CO 



QJ P >= 

3 » g 

•"^H ^* "-H 

+j 03 1 — 1 



CD 

bo 
03 ^ 

bo ft 

C rr7 

03 'Q 

- 1 3 

03 

3 . 

bo >» 
"S +3 



r^ CD rQ -3 



CD 




O 


»■— 1 


P 




3 


T3 




c^ 





y 


CO 
CD 


H-> 


CJ 
CD 


■4-J 
CO 


'ft 


CC 

y 


CD 

£ 


Ki 


ft 




I- 1 


3 


"O 








C/J 


CD 


r3 


Oj 



:-. 



- > .» ; 
: - » 
-; B 

:/ := 

: ■ -5| 

- : -1 

c:e r 
■': ■»■ 

- -2 



-3 



CD I -P 

r? S<« 

+3 ft„3 
-p 

03 o 73 

4J H-» rn 

w 2 - 

CD 3 - 

Sh 73 g 

O 1 q. 03 

2 °S 
J S3 S 

03 o o 
CO CJ 

^r2g 

<a"> 
43 » S 

H * .2 

to +j 

< '43 



j3 3-p 

+3 73 3 

>> r2 

rO <H O 

o 

"O rrH 

CJ-Ci CD 



03 



2 o S 

ftPQ ° 

ft 2 

03 >> S 



CO 

73 <J 
3 

^ 3 

to- .2 

U -P 
CD 03 

3 « 
O 

•-• rrH 
CO r t 
03 W 



■° o S° 

pO CD © 73 

CO r3 O rH 

CD CD -P 03 

3 X! «H o 

CD 5 '43 g 03 



Sh -P CO 

« 3 ,rt 

ftrO ^ 
CQ .03 



CJ 



3 
CD 
CJ 

10 ft I fe 

-H M "P 

2 03 _ 3 

'8'il 

ftrB ° 

03 CJ -— 
_, 03 03 
1^ -P 

w ^ 51 

o3 O «U 

r3 



3 
3 
O 
o 

'S3 

CD 

3 
CD 
bo 
CD 

j3 
•p 

£ 

O 



* £ 

CD 



O «8 ft 

3 -p ft 

3 

CD O 03 

— O 

Irt fH O 

> ««■ 3 



03 
ft 
03 

73 
CJ 

CD 



0) 

a> 'E 

J I 

< -c 



JJ O 



73 U <H 
CD O O 

■P C * H 

OJ S? S fl 

c .5 ° 

nl T3 '43 

•<h 03 

cjS 

ftO 



CD 

3 



>i73 3 
."ti 03 co 

o„.S 

•P O cjD 

r2 243 
rH rlH H-> 



O rO P" 



03 

>; 3 



a 2'G 



03 rQ 
" 3 

03 



O 



CO Sh 

o 

r^^ 

" T3 

3 
3 



O -p 



CD 


CD 


Sh 


3 


1 — ' 


CD 


CD 


1— 1 


bo 


O 


CM 


11) 


CD 


01 


£ 


43 

H 


3 


CD 




3 


43 







H-n 



III 

r^ CJ 03 

CJ .i3 Sh 
° Dh -S 

Ph .2 
cd 'O g 
43 c 3 
-p 03 3 



£1 

3 g 

03 o 

43 '43 

-P CJ 
03 g 

3 -p 
o co 

£ C 

o 

o 
c o 

«H O 

O J3 
o 

CD CO 

CJ 

03 .—1 



o3 

oi 

+» 3 

*• £ 

cj o 

CD O 
•is 
42 CD 

3 ,3 

CO -P 

>. o 

« g 

3 CD 

O -P 

°2 

•9 >> 

§^ 

£ "ol 
43 > 

o O 

S ft 



O 73 3 
3 "g T3 

., S 03 



ft O ,-P 



■" CD ^5 

O 55 H 

Hr-rH g 

O W CD 

'43 r3 ^ 

CQ O 2 

(1) L ^ 

3 03 ^ 

C3<g CD 

O A 

4? <^ -p 

^ 43 o3 
3-c¥ 

Or2.S 



O «H O) 
-P O ,3 



o3 
O 

5 pq 
ft 

p >> 

3 



.S « 

O 3 

•>Hj O 

03^ 

-p 73 
c 3 

CD 3 



o 1 3 

CD g 

+^ 

CD 
CD 

2^ 

CD 

C r2 

.2 2 

'03 te 



3 Ph 
O 
+3 CD 

03 j3 

CJ H-i 



ft 


CJ 


03 


<j 


rtl 


CD 




43 


<1J 


•p 


■p 









> 






03 


MH 


v. 


n 


(J 




ft 


>- 


O 


H^ 


ft 


Sh 




O 


O 


•1 — •- 


P 



,3 

CD 53 

^ rr, 
-P 73 

CD 

<n > 

H O 
Sh 

ft 



3 2 

o 43 



J2 s. 

SrQ 

CQ 73 

3 cj 
o > 
CJ p 

ft 

rfl S 

r^H rH 



^j CD 

03 rQ 
r3 

+» 3 

CD 

CO rd 

CD h3 



1 I 03 73 



ft 



3 ^3 


3 


CD 


73 W 


O 




W q_i 

<p ° 


-p 

73 


ft 

£ 


O 73 
Sh 


3 

O 




CJ 


T3 o3 


CJ 


0) 


r5 ° 


cd 




S PQ 


43 

-t-j 


03 


P5 03 




-p 


•4^> 




CJ 


jb-2 


OJ 


<J 


s'co 


"3 


CD 


3 CD 


3 


^3 


65 


^3 
3 


3 


g rt 


03 
3 




H « 


O 





43 ,2 


■P 


HH 


CJ +J 


rt 




'JS 03 


CJ 


HI 


Ph CJ 


3 


CO 



CD CD 

r3 42 

-p 

CQ 

03 3 
^ 2 

-P rQ 
^^ 

CD >*h 
Sh -P 

5^° 

03 0> 

4i ' Sh CJ 
3 

03 



CJ 

<J 03 

^ CO 

03 j. . 

-C o'O 

*" r2 

» Sh 03 

r3 03 03 

■P 73 ft 

•g Sh CD 

P O Sh 



Students Again to View 
'World of Carl Sandburg' 

Governor Dan K. Moore an- 
nounced on Sept. 30 that "The 
World of Carl Sandburg" will be 
presented again this year by the 
Flat Rock Players to high school 
audiences throughout the Tar 
Heel State. 

Continuation of the perform- 
ances, the Governor said, has been 
made possible by arrangements 
worked out by State Treasurer 
Edwin Gill with several public 
utilities firms to finance the proj- 
ect. A requested appropriation of 
$13,000 for the purpose had been 
deleted from the State budget this 
year. 

The performances, staged by 
the Flat Rock Playhouse of Flat 
Rock, N. C, consist of excerpts 
from poems, stories and folk songs 
by Carl Sandburg, who has resid- 
ed at Flat Rock for several years. 

Over the past two years, an es- 
timated 100,000 high school stu- 
dents attended 120 performances 
of the stage production. 

Fall Tour Set 

Arrangements for the fall tour 
are being worked out through the 
office of Raymond L. Rhodes, su- 
pervisor of Student Activities, 
State Department of Public In- 
struction. Rhodes said that, as far 
as possible, the itinerary would 
include schools which had not yet 
participated in the project. 

The firms which are cooperat- 
ing in underwriting the perform- 
ances this year are Duke Power 
Co., Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., Carolina Power and 
Light Co., Virginia Electric and 
Power Co., and Carolina Telephone 
and Telegraph Co. 

In announcing the arrange- 
ments for the tour, the Governor 
again voiced the opinion that he 
did not think the General Assem- 
bly really intended to eliminate 
the Sandburg project or the 
Shakespeare project. "In all the 
hurry of adjournment, they simply 
got lost in the shuffle," Moore said. 



Board Adopts Additions to Athletic Regulations 



Five new regulations and two 
amendments to the Rules and Reg- 
ulations Governing Athletics in 
the Public Schools of North Caro- 
lina were adopted by the State 
Board of Education on Aug. 5. 

One of the new regulations, sin- 
gled out for special mention in 
several newspaper articles, stipu- 
lates that a student "shall not be 
subjected to undue influence by an 
individual or group of individuals 
to cause him to be transferred 
from one school to another for ath- 
letic purposes." 

Need Explained 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, explained that this new reg- 
ulation had been recommended in 
view of the widespread adoption 
of "freedom of choice" provisions 
for assignment of students by lo- 
cal units in their plans for com- 
pliance with Federal regulations 
under the Civil Rights Act. 

The regulation requires that the 
decision as to "what constitutes 
undue influence" be decided by 
the "appropriate association or 
conference to which the school be- 
longs ... on the basis of evidence 
presented in each case." 

English Supervisor Weds, 
Joins Faculty of College 

Mrs. Joan Pierce Newman, State 
supervisor of English, and Robert 
L. Battle of Rocky Mount ex- 
changed marriage vows on Aug. 28 
in a ceremony held at Lakeside 
Baptist Church in Rocky Mount. 

Mrs. Battle resigned her posi- 
tion with the State Department of 
Public Instruction effective Sept. 
30 to join the faculty of North 
Carolina Wesleyan College at 
Rocky Mount, where the couple will 
make their home. She joined the 
State staff in September 1963. 

The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
J. A. Pierce of Rocky Mount, she 
is a graduate of Wake Forest Col- 
lege and holds the master's degree 
in English from Duke University. 
Mr. Battle is associated with the 
National Cash Register Company 
in Rocky Mount. 



Other Regulations 

The four other new regulations 
are as follows: 

• A student cannot participate 
more than four seasons in any 
sport. 

• Starting time for afternoon 
games for teams composed of 
seventh, eighth, and ninth 
grade students shall be no later 
than 5:30. 

• Girls may participate in State- 
wide golf, tennis and swim- 
ming meets. 

• The principal shall have on 
file in his office evidence of the 
legal birth date of each player. 
He shall also have evidence of 
the date of each player's entry 
into the ninth grade. 

The two amendments permit 
baseball teams to play a double- 
header "where mutually agreed 
upon by the teams involved" and 
allow scheduling of two track 
meets "twice during the season 
. . . within the same week . . . 
provided they do not occur on con- 
secutive days." 

LINC Board Names Governor 
President of Organization 

Governor Dan K. Moore was 
elected president of the Learning 
Institute of North Carolina by the 
organization's board of directors 
at its annual meeting on June 11. 

Dr. Douglas M. Knight, presi- 
dent of Duke University, was re- 
elected vice president, and Dr. 
Charles F. Carroll, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction will 
continue as treasurer. Dr. Donald 
B. Anderson, vice president of the 
Consolidated University of North 
Carolina, agreed to serve temporar- 
ily as secretary. 

LINC, a private, nonprofit cor- 
poration, was established in Feb- 
ruary 1964 by Governor Terry San- 
ford and the heads of the major 
education agencies in the State. 
Its purposes are to foster educa- 
tional research, to serve as a guid- 
ing agency for new educational 
programs already established with 
the aid of funds from private foun- 
dations, and to evaluate these pro- 
grams. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Reference Materials Guide Completely Revised 



School librarians and other 
school personnel concerned with 
the selection of reference mate- 
rials, audiovisual aids, and other 
learning resource materials have 
recently been provided with a val- 
uable guide, the second edition of 
Reference Materials for School Li- 
braries, Grades 1-12 (Publication 
No. 385), issued by the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 

Cleveland Voters Approve 
School Construction Bonds 

A $3.25 million bond issue for 
construction of two consolidated 
high schools and renovation of 
existing elementary schools was 
approved by Cleveland County vot- 
ers in a special referendum on 
May 28. 

The vote was 3,420 to 1,615, with 
better than 84 percent of the coun- 
ty's registered voters participat- 
ing. 

Plans call for construction of 
two consolidated high schools — 
one between Fallston and Lawn- 
dale, and the other in the Shanghai 
area — and for extensive renova- 
tions at a number of elementary 
schools. 



Voters in Stanly Turn Down 
Special Levy for Schools 

Stanly County voters, in a refer- 
endum on May 22, defeated by a 
margin of nearly 8 to 1 a proposed 
special school levy that might have 
raised taxes as much as 40 per- 
cent. 

Presented as a "Package for 
Progress," the tax raise of not 
more than 30 cents per $100 valu- 
ation was aimed at eliminating 
combination grades and heavy 
teacher loads. The county's current 
tax rate is 67 cents per $100. 

The proposed levy was defeated 
by a vote of 8,083 to 1,016, with 
only one precinct, Palmerville, reg- 
istering a favorable vote. 



A complete revision of the pub- 
lication of the same title issued in 
1959 (Publication No. 321) and 
the Supplement to the first edition 
published in 1963, the new edition 
is broader in scope as well as in- 
cluding more up-to-date entries. 

"This publication is expected to 
be of particular value in selecting 
titles to support National Defense 
Education Act projects as well as 
programs and projects under the 
Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act of 1965," said Cora Paul 
Bomar, State supervisor of Libra- 
ry and Instructional Materials 
Services. It was prepared under 
Miss Bomar's direction. Mrs. Mar- 
garet P. McCotter was in charge 
of editorial work on the publica- 
tion. 

Broad Scope 

"This new bulletin reflects the 
philosophy that varied materials 
must be available in the school 
library to satisfy reference and 
research needs arising in the 
classroom," Miss Bomar stated. 

"In addition to the traditional 
reference-type books, many indi- 
vidual volumes on varied subjects 
are described as well as guides to 
the selection of paperbound books, 
pamphlets, magazines, films, film- 
strips, and recordings. The open- 
ing chapter discusses principles 
guiding the selection, organiza- 
tion, and use of the reference ma- 
terials and gives suggestions for 
teaching reference and research 
skills. An author-title index and 
a directory of publishers are in- 
cluded. 

"The 958 titles listed in the bul- 
letin are arranged according to 
the Dewey Decimal classification 
system. Within each subject area, 
titles on varying levels of diffi- 
culty are included." 

A copy of the publication has 
been sent free of charge to each 
public school in the State. Addi- 
tional copies are available at $1.00 
each from Publications, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, 
Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



Library Planning Guide 
Offers Valuable Pointers 

Learning Resources Library, an 

attractive 16-page bulletin recent- 
ly issued by the State Department 
of Public Instruction, is designed 
to serve as a planning guide for 
school administrators and for the 
planning professions involved in 
the design of school library facil- 
ities. 

Prepared under the direction of 
Marvin R. A. Johnson, design con- 
sultant, Division of School Plan- 
ning, in cooperation with Cora 
Paul Bomar, supervisor of Libra- 
ry and Instructional Materials 
Services, the planning guide (Pub- 
lication No. 387) incorporates 
many suggestions offered by prac- 
ticing architects, school librari- 
ans, and educators throughout 
the State. 

Basic Concept 

Keyed to the "emerging concept 
of the school library" as a compre- 
hensive and complex facility serv- 
ing the functions of "an instruc- 
tional materials center, a learning 
resources laboratory, a center for 
independent study, and a pushbut- 
ton electronic center utilizing the 
newer media," Learning Resources 
Library offers basic suggestions 
which can be adapted to the spe- 
cific needs and purposes of various 
library planning projects. 

It reviews the services, mate- 
rials and equipment provided by 
the learning resources library, the 
activities and purposes which it 
serves, and the personnel needed 
for optimum operation. Important 
general considerations regarding 
environmental factors are listed. 

The latter half of the planning 
guide is devoted to more specific 
information and ideas about physi- 
cal facilities, equipment, and fur- 
niture, including sizes and rela- 
tionships of spaces, drawings and 
dimensions of typical equipment 
and furniture, and suggestions for 
adaptations to suit specific needs. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



11 



Winning Film Stars Charlotte School Library 



". . . And Something More," 
prizewinning film based on libra- 
ry services in the Sedgefield Ele- 
mentary School in Charlotte, 
shows what happens to students 
in a good elementary school with 
a good library. 

The 28-minute film, sponsored 
by the Knapp School Libraries 
Project of the American Library 
Association, was named winner of 
the American Film Festival award 
and was also winner of the CINE 

TV School Library Course 

Hailed as 'Breakthrough 7 

A televised in-service course in 
children's literature is being of- 
fered this fall over WUNC-TV, 
Channel 4, through arrangements 
between the In-Service Education 
Program of the State Department 
of Public Instruction and the Ex- 
tension Division of the University 
of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

Hailed by Miss Cora Paul Bo- 
mar, State supervisor of Library 
and Instructional Materials Serv- 
ices as "a real breakthrough in the 
attempt to bring library education 
to the local communities," the 
course is being offered primarily 
for persons seeking to qualify for 
the librarian's certificate. It can 
also be taken for credit by elemen- 
tary teachers, as it does not dupli- 
cate the course normally taken by 
them in their undergraduate 
preparation, said Dr. James Val- 
same, State supervisor of In- 
Service Education. 

The course carries three semes- 
ter hours of undergraduate or 
graduate credit, Valsame said, and 
credit can be applied, if appropri- 
ate for the person involved, toward 
original certification or certificate 
renewal in library science and 
primary or grammar grade teach- 
ing. 

The course, Literature in the 
Elementary School (Education 
c516) is being taught by Mrs. Ruth 
Tooze, assisted by Mrs. Mary 
Frances Johnson. It is televised 
each Monday, Thursday, and Fri- 
day from 3:30-4:15 p.m. through 
December 8. 



Golden Eagle award presented by 
the Council on International Non- 
theatrical Events, Inc. 

The 16 mm color film uses excit- 
ing cinematographic effects to 
communicate the impact of good 
library service on the instruction- 
al program of an elementary 
school. Illustrations of how libra- 
ry service can accelerate and im- 
prove learning are told through 
the central figure of the film, 
"Mike," a sixth-grader facing ad- 
justment to a new community. 

Sedgefield elementary school 
was chosen as the site for the film 
because of its "dynamic library 
program and because it is located 
in a community in which the ra- 
cial, cultural, and economic back- 
grounds of children are varied," 
according to the Knapp Advisory 
Committee. 

The Sedgefield library serves as 
the center for all instructional ma- 
terials in the school — books, mod- 
els, recordings, filmstrips, and 
other materials. More than 5,000 
books are available to its 600 stu- 
dents, along with 21 periodicals, 
132 filmstrips, and 230 recordings. 

Those who appear in the film 
were students at the school at the 
time of the filming. The librarian, 
Mrs. Sarah Innes, and many of 
the school's 21 teachers play im- 
portant roles in the film. More 
than anything else, the title of this 
production, ". . . And Something 
More," refers to the fact that a 
well-prepared librarian is neces- 
sary for the types of services and 
creative results which are por- 
trayed in this film. 

The film was produced by Gug- 
genheim Productions, Inc., of St. 
Louis, Mo., and may be purchased, 
rented, or borrowed on a loan 
basis. Information relative to dis- 
tribution may be secured through 
Knapp School Libraries Project, 
50 East Huron Street, Chicago, 
60611. 

The film was recently shown to 
the staff of the Department of 
Public Instruction and other in- 
terested guests. 



Groups Honor Terry Sanford 
In New Award for Educators 

An award to recognize outstand- 
ing creative and innovative ac- 
complishments on the part of Tar 
Heel educators has been estab- 
lished by the N. C. Education As- 
sociation and the N. C. Teachers 
Association in honor of former 
Gov. Terry Sanford. 

Sanford was presented a check 
for $15,859.15 by Dr. Samuel Dun- 
can, president of the NCTA and 
Dr. A. C. Dawson, president of the 
NCEA in a brief ceremony at the 
former Governor's law office in 
Raleigh on Sept. 16. 

'Deep Appreciation' 

Dr. Dawson told Sanford that 
the money had been contributed 
by teachers and educators 
throughout the State to express 
"their deep appreciation for what 
you did to highlight education 
during your administration." 

Sanford expressed appreciation 
for the tribute, remarking that he 
was grateful to have "not just a 
going-away present" but some- 
thing "to leave in the State to rec- 
ognize good teaching." He signed 
the check over to the NCEA, which 
will act as trustee for the award 
fund. 

Annual Award 

The Terry Sanford Award will 
be presented annually to the edu- 
cator or educators in North Caro- 
lina who have made noteworthy 
contributions in teaching or ad- 
ministration. The winner will be 
selected by the Learning Insti- 
tute of North Carolina from among 
nominees submitted by city and 
county superintendents. 

Sanford had previously declaimed 
that he did not want a personal 
gift, when he learned of plans to 
present him a car or a scholarship 
fund for his two children. He sug- 
gested that some plan be made for 
recognizing and rewarding good 
teaching. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



New Bulletin Offers Occupational Descriptions 



Guidance personnel, teachers of 
occupational orientation courses, 
and students seeking information 
about Trade and Industrial Edu- 
cation opportunities will find a 



Scientist Named President 
Of Guilford Technical Unit 

Dr. Herbert Francis Marco, for- 
mer dean of academic affairs at 
Allegany Community College, Cum- 
berland, Md., assumed his new 
duties in May as president of the 
Guilford Technical Institute near 
Jamestown. 

A native of New York State, Dr. 
Marco holds three degrees from 
Cornell University in timber engi- 
neering; an M.S. degree in wood 
technology from Syracuse Univer- 
sity; and the Ph.D. degree from 
Yale. 

Prior to World War II, he was 
employed as a scientist and engi- 
neer for Yale University, the fed- 
eral government, and the State of 
Connecticut. During the war, he 
served as a major in the Air Force, 
most of the time as a crew mem- 
ber on B-24s in Europe. 

On his return to the United 
States, he became a member of the 
original team which organized the 
Air Force Institute of Technology 
at Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio. He 
was chairman of faculty there for 
11 years. He organized the Engi- 
neering Division of South Dakota 
State College and was dean there 
for three years. Later, he was 
called into industrial work as an 
engineer-scientist in missile and 
space vehicle building programs. 
He was manager of weather satel- 
lites for the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration for a 
year before becoming dean at 
Allegany Community College. 

Dr. Marco's wife, the former 
Christine Jane Dry, is a native of 
Mt. Pleasant, N. C. They have 
three children. 



useful resource in Training Op- 
portunities for High School Stu- 
dents in North Carolina, recently 
issued by the State Department of 
Public Instruction as Publication 
No. 388. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, in his 
Foreword to the new informational 
bulletin, observes that the publi- 
cation should also prove "most 
useful to local school boards and 
administrators in planning their 
vocational education programs." 

Charles D. Bates, State super- 
visor of Trade and Industrial Ed- 
ucation, observed that the most 
unusual feature of the 53-page 
publication is the series of de- 
scriptions of specific occupational 
areas following the opening sur- 
vey of the Trade and Industrial 
Education Program in North Car- 
olina. 

Occupational Areas 

These occupational descriptions, 
available in quantity as separate 
monographs, include the occupa- 
tional title as listed in the Diction- 
ary of Occupational Titles; con- 
cise information on the type of 
work, general qualifications, and 
employment opportunities; and a 
suggested course schedule. A pho- 
tograph showing an actual on-the- 
job training situation illustrates 
each of the full-page monographs. 

The bulletin was prepared under 
the direction of the State Super- 
visor by Vincent L. Martinson, as- 
sistant State Supervisor of Trade 
and Industrial Education, with 
editorial assistance by James E. 
Jackman of the Department's Pub- 
lications staff. It incorporates sug- 
gestions by other members of the 
State Trade and Industrial Edu- 
cation staff and a number of local 
T&I coordinators and teachers. 

Copies of the complete bulletin 
and the separate monographs may 
be obtained by writing to State 
Supervisor, Trade and Industrial 
Education, State Department of 
Public Instruction, Raleigh, N. C. 
27602. 



Educator's Bookshelf 

Guidebook on Desegregation 
Offers Helpful Information 

Planning and Preparing for Suc- 
cessful School Desegregation, a 47- 
page booklet prepared by Herbert 
Wey for Phi Delta Kappa and its 
Commission on Education and Hu- 
man Rights, is intended as a guide- 
book for school leaders who find 
themselves in the process of trying 
to put into operation a successful 
plan of desegregation. The bro- 
chure is based on the experience of 
schools which have successfully im- 
plemented desegregation plans in 
recent years. 

These experiences have been 
arranged in logical and easy-to-use 
form by Dr. Wey, associate dean of 
the school of education in the Uni- 
versity of Miami, formerly of Ap- 
palachian State Teachers College. 
Major sections of this publication 
include the following: "Personnel 
Involved in Plan Development," 
"Information Needed for Plan De- 
velopment," "Decision Making in 
Plan Development," "Preparing 
for Desegregation," "Plan Struc- 
ture," "Four Examples," and 
"Working With News Media, Po- 
lice, and Other Groups in Imple- 
menting A Plan." 

The ideas presented in this book- 
let are in line with the thinking of 
informed people on the subject and 
should prove helpful in preparing 
and implementing a plan for de- 
segregation that will be successful. 
Since the preparation, adoption, 
and implementation of a plan for 
desegregation is the most impor- 
tant task many school administra- 
tors will undertake in their profes- 
sional lives, it is essential that the 
successful experiences and the 
advice of others be considered. 
Familarity with this publication 
should help to bring insight, know- 
how, and encouragement to a num- 
ber of school leaders. 

Planning and Preparing for Suc- 
cessful School Desegregation may 
be secured through Phi Delta 
Kappa, Inc., Eighth and Union, 
Bloomington, Indiana, 47402, for 
fifty cents.— V.M.M. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



13 



jUe Httatmetf Qene/icU (luleA . • . 



Schools: Fund-Raising Activities 

29 September 1965 

The purpose of this letter is to 
amend recent opinions from this 
office with respect to the applica- 
tion of the law to certain so-called 
business activities conducted by 
or under the auspices of public 
schools or permitted by the 
schools to be carried on by teach- 
ers, pupils and civic organiza- 
tions.* 

My staff and I have restudied 
the entire matter and, even though 
the law is far from clear, I have 
concluded that certain observations 
expressed in the opinions hereto- 
fore are too restrictive in practical 
application. The activities of the 
hundreds of different schools are 
too numerous and varied to en- 
able me to set forth a definitive 
list of activities which a school is 
legally authorized to conduct. How- 
ever, I would like to set down cer- 
tain general guidelines which may 
be helpful in this area. 

It is highly doubtful that G. S. 
66-58 is applicable to many ac- 
tivities carried on in the public 
schools. This section of the law 
contains certain exemptions specif- 
ically relating to public schools 
which would seem to indicate a 
definite legislative intent that the 
general coverage of the section is 
applicable to the public schools. 

It must be remembered that the 
statute is a criminal statute and 
must be strictly construed against 
the State in its application — all the 
more so if ambiguous in its lang- 
uage. 

There is also a rule of statutory 
construction that, when the mean- 
ing of a statute is not clear, and 
administrative agencies have inter- 
preted it over a period of time, and 
the Legislature has repeatedly met 
without enacting any amendments 
to modify the administrative inter- 
pretation, then such administra- 
tive interpretation will be deemed 
to be correct by reason of legisla- 
tive acquiescence therein. 

With respect to the statute in 
question, hundreds of school units 



'Editor's Note: 

These previous opinions are quoted below 
their entirety. 



have for many years interpreted 
the statute as not being applicable 
to the school activities under con- 
sideration. The General Assembly 
has met a number of times since 
the enactment of the law in its 
present form and has not seen fit 
to change administrative interpre- 
tation by further amendments in 
the area we are here concerned 
with. 

This, of course, does not mean 
that schools have been given legis- 
lative authority to enter unre- 
strainedly into the field of retail 
merchandising without limitation 
or restriction. I do not think it 
would be proper for a school to 
operate a commissary or store that 
competed generally in the entire 
field of retail merchandising. 

On the other hand, various fund 
raising activities in the public 
schools and the conducting of cer- 
tain school related activities have 
become traditional and accepted, 
and I do not think the school laws 
are to be interpreted as prohibiting 
such activities so long as they are 
supervised and kept within reason- 
able appropriate limits by the var- 
ious school administrative authori- 
ties. I refer to and include — with- 
out attempting to make the list 
definitive — such activities as offer- 
ing limited school sponsored in- 
surance to the pupils through the 
means of a duly licensed insurance 
company; the sale of extra pictures 
to pupils when photographs are 
taken in connection with a legiti- 
mate school purpose such as an 
identification program or the pub- 
lication of an annual yearbook; 
magazine subscription campaigns 
by pupils for extra-curricular 
school funds; selling of individual 
items of merchandise, such as 
candy, by pupils to raise funds for 
the school; operation of food and 
drink stands at school events, ath- 
letic or otherwise, with profits ac- 
cruing to the athletic or other 
school funds; publication of a 
school newspaper or annual year- 
book; special events sponsored by 
the school, or the PTA, or other 
civic organizations on special, iso- 
lated occasions to raise supple- 



mental funds for recognized school 
or school-related purposes. 

I mention only general types of 
activities which I think are per- 
missible. It may not always be easy 
in any given instance to draw a 
sharp line between what a school 
should or should not do or sponsor, 
but such a decision must by its 
nature rest in the final analysis 
upon the good judgment of the 
local school authorities. Care 
should be taken not to enter into 
general competition with private 
business. 

I believe it would be highly de- 
sirable for the General Assembly 
at its next session to attempt to 
clarify the law in this area with a 
more detailed and specific delinea- 
tion of the activities which it 
wishes to permit or prohibit. At- 
torney General, September 29, 
1965. 

Public Schools; School Stores Operoted 
for Profit; Government in Business. 

24 August 1965 

It has been brought to our atten- 
tion in several instances that the 
public schools of the State are operat- 
ing school stores in the school build- 
ings, or at least on school property 
and that in these stores various items 
are sold for profit. 

Your attention is called to Article 
11 of Chapter 66 of the General Sta- 
tutes entitled "Government in Busi- 
ness." In subsection (a) you will see 
that it is unlawful for any subdivision 
or any department or agency of the 
State or any employees thereof "to 
engage directly or indirectly in the 
sale of goods, wares or merchandise in 
competition with citizens of the 
State." There are many exceptions 
to this first section which are set 
forth in subsection (b) of G. S. 66-88. 
The only exception relating to the 
public schools is Paragraph (9) of 
this subsection which allows the op- 
eration by the public schools of school 
cafeterias. The cafeterias, of course, 
may sell cakes, soft drinks, food and 
other food products as these things 
are a part of a school food service. 
We are of the opinion, however, that 
the public schools of the State are 
not authorized to operate school stores 
where items are sold in competition 
with the merchants of the State. I 
send you copy of the law in question. 

Yours very truly, 

T. W. BRUTON 

Attorney General 

Ralph Moody 

Deputy Attorney General 

(Continued on page 15) 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^JUe Atiotmetf, Qene^al dtdel . . 



(Continued from page 14) 



Public Schools; Operation of Public 
School Stores; Government in Business; 
Prohibited Sale of Competitive Articles; 
Sale of Instructional Supplies and Books; 
Penalties for Violating the Statute. 
3 September 1965 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
has sent me a copy of your letter of 
August 30, 1965, in which you com- 
ment on my letter of August 27, 
1965, dealing with the subject of the 
operation of public school stores. In 
my letter I had indicated that the 
only exception to the statute prohibit- 
ing governmental units from being 
in business was G. S. 66-58 (c)(9), 
which permitted the operation by the 
public schools of school cafeterias. 

When Dr. Carroll received my let- 
ter he called over the telephone and 
pointed out that G. S. 66-58(c) (11) 
made another exception and author- 
ized: 'The sale of textbooks, library 
books, forms, bulletins, and instruc- 
tional supplies by the State Beard 
of Education, State Department of 
Public Instruction, and local school 
authorities.' 

I was in error, of course, in stating 
that the operation by the public 
schools of school cafeterias was the 
sole exception and I told Dr. Carroll 
that if he transmitted the contents 
of my letter to make the correction. 

As will be shown by Article 11 of 
Chapter 66 of the General Statutes 
entitled : 'Government in Business' 
it is the fixed policy of the State of 
North Carolina that governmental 
units shall not engage in business in 
competition with private citizens who 
are in private business, commercial 
firms, corporations and partnerships. 
The General Assembly of this State 
appropriates many millions of dol- 
lars for the support and maintenance 
of the public school system. These 
citizens who are engaged in commer- 
cial enterprises are heavily taxed and 
pay a large part of the public school 
appropriation in the form of taxes. 
It would be grossly unfair for gov- 
ernmental units, which are the crea- 
tures of the people of the State and 
who pay no taxes, to sell articles of 
merchandise in competition with the 
people who support them. This is 
analogous to the servant slowly cut- 
ting his master's throat. 

In order that there may be no mis- 
take about the matter I quote the 
primary paragraph of G. S. 66-58 
(Vol. 2C) as follows: 

Sec. 66-58. Sale of merchandise 
by governmental units. — (a) Ex- 
cept as may be provided in this 
section, it shall be unlawful for 
any unit, department or agency 
of the State government, or any 



division or subdivision of any 
such unit, department or agency, 
or any individual employee or em- 
ployees of any such unit, depart- 
ment or agency in his, or her, or 
their capacity as employee or em- 
ployees thereof, to engage directly 
or indirectly in the sale of goods, 
wares or merchandise in competi- 
tion with citizens of the State, or 
to engage in the operation of 
restaurants, cafeterias or other 
eating places in any building 
owned by or leased in the name of 
the State, or to maintain service 
establishments for the rendering 
of services to the public ordinarily 
and customarily rendered by pri- 
vate enterprises, or to contract 
with any person, firm or corpora- 
tion for the operation or render- 
ing of any such businesses or serv- 
ices on behalf of any such unit, 
department or agency, or to pur- 
chase for or sell to any person, 
firm or corporation any article of 
merchandise in competition with 
private enterprise. The leasing or 
subleasing of space in any building 
owned, leased or operated by any 
unit, department or agency or 
division or subdivision thereof of 
the State for the purpose of op- 
erating or rendering of any of the 
businesses or services herein re- 
ferred to is hereby prohibited.' 

We pointed out in our former letter 
the exception of school cafeterias, 
and, as stated in subsection (c)(ll), 
school stores may sell books, forms, 
bulletins, and instructional supplies. 
The word 'instructional', according 
to Webster's International Dictionary, 
means: 'Pertaining to, serving for, 
or promoting instruction; educa- 
tional.' 

I would think that the public 
schools avail themselves of the State 
textbook rental system for the most 
part but public school stores may sell 
books related to the instructional and 
educational process; it would not in- 
clude such books as 'Candy' and 'The 
Memoirs of Casanova'. It would in- 
clude pencils, pens, ink, stationery, 
notebooks, erasers, rulers, and pro- 
tractors. It does not include packaged 
foodstuffs, pink sodapop, alka seltzer, 
aspirin, electrical appliances and all 
of that vast quantity of appliances 
and gadgets used in contemporary 
life and which are sold by merchants 
everywhere. 

Local school boards and their ad- 
ministrative officers should take these 
statutes seriously for I call your 
attention to the fact that anyone who 
violates these statutes is guilty of a 
serious offense for G. S. 66-58 (e) 
provides as follows: 'Any person, 
whether employee of the State of 
North Carolina or not, who shall 



violate, or participate in the viola- 
tion of this section, shall be guilty of 
a misdemeanor.' This is what we call 
a general misdemeanor and in this 
State it is punishable by a severe fine, 
the limits of which have been sus- 
tained as high as $10,000, and it is 
also punishable by imprisonment for 
as high as two years. 

It is my understanding that instruc- 
tional supplies and those things which 
are purchased for resale cannot be 
purchased under bids and contracts 
entered into by the State Depart- 
ment of Purchase & Contract. This 
office ruled sometime ago that State 
contracts were not available to local 
school units who purchase resale 
commodities and supplies. Purchase 
and contract arrangements of the 
State deal with school supplies of a 
capital nature such as desks, chairs, 
mobile classrooms, typewriters and 
office machines and things of this 
nature. It would be strange indeed if 
public school stores could purchase 
under State contract at a considerable 
discount, pay no taxes, and sell in 
competition with private merchants. 

We deal now with the sale of soft 
drinks and of packaged foods and 
confections at athletic contests and 
various public school assemblies some- 
times designated in the category of 
extracurricular activities. The same 
rule applies and there is no excep- 
tion for this purpose. These things 
should be handled by private business. 
If the public schools can compete with 
merchants in one section of school ac- 
tivities, then by the same logic they 
can compete in any section, and, as we 
have seen, this is prohibited. Soft 
drink coin machines are handled by 
private business, and it seems there 
would be no objection to having these 
machines in school buildings at proper 
places. There is no disposition on the 
part of this office to unduly restrict 
the activities of the public schools but 
we have no choice other than to call 
attention to the laws enacted by the 
members of the General Assembly 
who represent the people of the 
State. 

Public Schools; Government in Business; 
Civic Club Selling Soft Drinks and other 
Refreshments with Profits Donated to the 
Athletic Fund of the School. 

13 September 1965 

You submit to this office for con- 
sideration* two questions, and your 
first question is in substance as fol- 
lows: 

Would it be a violation of G. S. 
65-58 for a certain civic club to sell 
to the people attending athletic con- 
tests soft drinks, candies, popcorn, 
peanuts, and other light refresh- 
ments, which civic club donates all 
of the profits to the athletic fund 

*Second question is irrelevant to sub- 
ject and is not quoted. 

(Continued on page 16) 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



IS 



*7<4e Atto-b*teif> Qembal Rtued . . . 



(Continued from page 15) 



of the high school? The same question 
is presented wherein the Monogram 
Club composed of members of the 
athletic teams and the coaching staff 
sell light refreshments at a stand 
adjacent to the gymnasium, and the 
Club donates all profits to the high 
school athletic fund. 

We do not see any difference be- 
tween this and the same things being 
sold by the scoool. The athletic funds 
receive the profits and the clubs in- 
volved are mere agencies or instru- 
mentalities authorized by the schools 
to carry on these sales. We do not 
think that you can do indirectly what 
is prohibited to be done directly. 

Public Schools; Article 1 1 of Chapter 66 
of the General Statutes; Unlawful Com- 
petition with Private Business by Govern- 
mental Units. 

1 4 September 1 965 

In your letter of September 3, 
1965, you submit to Dr. Carroll for 
intepretation certain questions as fol- 
lows: 

1. Item 11, page 2, Article 11 of 
the attached sheet, entitled Govern- 
ment in Business, states that 'the 
sale of textbooks, library books, 
forms, bulletins, and instructional 
supplies by the State Board of Ed- 
ucation, State Department of Public 
Instruction, and local school authori- 
ties' . . . My question is, would the 
sale of supplies such as pencils, 
paper, etc., constitute an exception 
under instructional supplies or is this 
prohibited? 

2. Does this opinion prohibit the 
sale of individual pictures to the 
pupils by the school? 

3. Does this opinion prohibit the 
schools from offering school insur- 
ance to the individual pupils? 

4. Does the opinion prohibit mag- 
azine subscription campaigns? 

5. Does the opinion prohibit the 
sale of certain items by the pupils 
to residents, such as candy, etc., in 
the community? 

As to your Question No. 1, it ap- 
pears to us that any legitimate items 
that enter into the instructional pro- 
cess may be sold by the public schools, 
and this would include the sale of 
such supplies as pencils, paper, pens, 
notebooks and bags of various sorts 
to carry books and supplies and those 
things that have a vital and relevant 
connection with instructional services. 
There are several items that could 
be included, such as ink and paper 
clips, but it would require too much 
time to give a comprehensive list of 



items. Naturally some judgment, dis- 
cretion and common sense must be 
used when these items are acquired 
for sale. 

As to your Question No. 2, in our 
opinion the Act cited above, and es- 
pecially G. S. 66-58 (a), does prohibit 
the sale of individual pictures by the 
school as this is the business of the 
professional and commercial photog- 
raphers. It was intended by the stat- 
ute that agencies of government 
would not do business in such a way 
as to compete with private operators 
because these people, after all, pay 
taxes that go into the public school 
appropriations. We do not conceive 
that the schools should be in any 
phase of the photography business. 

As to your Question No. 3, we are 
of the opinion that the public school 
system should not be in the insurance 
business or any phase thereof for the 
reasons that we have given above. 

As to your Question No. 4. we are 
of the opinion that magazine sub- 
scription campaigns are prohibited. 

Until our original opinion was writ- 
ten and responses from same have 
been coming in we never realized that 
the public schools were so entrenched 
in businesses that competed with 
private enterprise. We always 
thought that the function of the pub- 
lic schools was to teach pupils how 
to think, how to make objective in- 
vestigations in scientific and educa- 
tional fields and to develop a creative 
imagination that would give such 
persons when they grew up to be 
adults a zest and alertness in pursuit 
of their chosen professions and oc- 
cupations. If there is not enough 
money for the athletic funds and var- 
ious activity funds, then the remedy 
lies in the adoption of a proper bud- 
get and not in putting the public 
school system and its pupils into the 
realm of private business. 

For the same reasons given above 
the sale of certain items by pupils to 
residents, such as candy, if the pro- 
ceeds derived therefrom are to be 
used for any public school purpose, 
is prohibited; likewise the sale of 
soft drinks, candy, pop corn and 
other confections at athletic contests 
is prohibited. The school board may 
by a process of private negotiation 
select concessionaires from private 
business who are willing to perform 
these sales but the school board can- 
not do this for profit nor for a per- 
centage of the sales. In our opinion 
such concession contracts or permits 
would not be governed by the Public 
Contracts Act and it would not be 
necessary to submit the same to ad- 
vertisement and award to the lowest 
bidder. 



LOOKING BACK 

In October issues of the 

North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1960 

Carlton Fleetwood, NDEA pro- 
gram auditor since December 
1959, has been named State NDEA 
coordinator, succeeding Henry A. 
Shannon, who accepted a position 
with N. C. State College effective 
Sept. 1. 

Paul S. Flynn and Y. A. Taylor 
recently joined the staff of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction as supervisor of Audio- 
visual Education and supervisor 
of Secondary School Science, re- 
spectively. 

Ten Years Ago, 1955 

Nine school systems in North 
Carolina cooperated with the State 
Depai'tment of Public Instruction 
in producing a 25-minute color 
film, "Let's Visit School Libra- 
ries," which had its premier show- 
ing at the Superintendents Con- 
ference in Mars Hill early in 
August. 

Raymond K. Rhodes recently 
joined the staff of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction as 
a health educator, replacing Mrs. 
Annie Ray Moore, who is on leave 
of absence, working with the 
World Health Organization in 
Burma. 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1950 
Dr. A. S. Hurlburt, head of the 
Education Department at East 
Carolina College, has been named 
director of a special study project 
in education financed by a grant 
from the Knapp Foundation and 
authorized by the 1949 General 
Assembly. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1 945 
Supervisors of instruction have 
been employed by three Eastern 
counties, bringing the total num- 
ber of county units employing 
such supervisors to 14. These su- 
pervisors are employed out of 
local funds under State law. 
Twenty-Five Years Ago, 1940 
Occupational training for indus- 
tries making materials essential 
to national defense have been in 
operation since July 15 in seven 
North Carolina cities. Funds are 
allocated through the Division of 
Vocational Education. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 




Idlcational 

; ss 

OC I ATlOr* 

or 

M F. R I C A 




North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 






"Or 



NOVEMBER 1965 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, No. 3 




State Board, Superintendent Assail Regulation 
On ESEA Allotment as 'Obviously Discriminatory' 



North Carolina's State Board of 
Education and Superintendent of 
Public Instruction joined early this 
month in sharply criticizing a por- 
tion of the Federal regulation im- 
plementing and interpreting Title 
I of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act. 

The Board, at its November 4 
meeting, adopted a resolution ex- 
pressing "serious concern over the 
responsibility imposed on it by the 
U. S. Commissioner of Education 
for administering a program which 
discriminates among educationally 
and economically disadvantaged 
children as a result of Federal 
Regulation 116.17b (Rules and 
Regulations for Financial Assist- 
ance to Local Educational Agencies 
for the Education of Children of 
Low-Income Families, PL 89-10)." 

Amplifies Objections 

Following up the Board's action, 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion issued a statement amplifying 
the objections to the regulatory 
provision. 

Dr. Carroll and the Board zeroed 
in on the passage requiring that 
"in no event may a school attend- 
ance area be designated as proj- 
ect area if the degree of con- 
centration of such children 
(economically disadvantaged) is 
less than that of the school district 
as a whole." 

The Board, in its resolution, 
"deplores a regulation which is in- 
consistent with a Constitutional 
provision that it administer a 
general and uniform public school 
system," in that the regulation "so 
obviously discriminates among 
children for whom appropriations 
under Title I of PL 89-10 were 
intended." 



Not Intended Effect 

"I do not believe for a moment 
that the Congress of the United 
States believed at the time it passed 
this Educational Act that it would 
be administered in a discriminatory 
manner," said Dr. Carroll. 

Elimination of the unintended 
discrimination apparently would 
not require amending the law, Dr. 
Carroll stated, but rather, "it is 
the Federal regulations that appear 
to require amendment in order that 
the money in question can serve all 
economically disadvantaged and 
educationally deprived children. 

Under the present Regulation, 
Dr. Carroll observed, only "a bare 
majority" of the nation's economic- 
ally disadvantaged and education- 
ally deprived children" technically 
can receive benefits from the full 
amount of the money while a size- 
able minority of equally dis- 
advantaged children receive little, 
if anything." 

Cites Example 

For example, he said, "in a 
county or city school system in 
which 20 percent of the children 
have been declared by the Federal 
government to be economically dis- 
advantaged (from homes with less 
than $2000 annual income) and 
presumably educationally deprived, 
projects may be submitted from 
those schools or attendance areas 
in which 20 percent or more of the 
children are so designated. . . . 
Projects cannot be submitted from 
those schools in which the dis- 
advantaged and deprived constitute 
less than 20 percent of the enroll- 
ment. 

"Technically, children in a school 
with 22 percent disadvantaged and 
deprived can qualify for the money 
in this instance, and children in a 
school with 18 percent cannot." 



State Staffers to Confer 
With Schoolmen on ESEA 

As State-level planning for im- 
plementation of programs under 
the Elementary and Secondary Act 
of 1965 moved ahead, Superinten- 
dent Charles F. Carroll announced 
that teams of State staff members 
would be available for consultations 
with local school officials in four 
areas of the State December 14-16. 

Carlton T. Fleetwood, State 
NDEA coordinator and chairman 
of the ESEA Steering Committee 
said in mid-November that Ashe- 
ville, Salisbury, Raleigh, and 
Greenville had been tentatively 
selected as the sites for these in- 
terviews. He said further an- 
nouncement about the arrange- 
ments would be made at the NCEA 
Superintendents' Conference to be 
held at Durham Dec. 7-9. 

In a memorandum to county and 
city superintendents, Dr. Carroll 
urged the administrators to pro- 
ceed with the completion of Basic 
Data documents required under 
Title I regulations and to move 
ahead with designing educational 
programs to meet the needs of 
educationally deprived children in 
eligible schools. 

"We realize that many problems 
arise when aid is directed to small 
segments of the school population 
and we share these problems with 
you," Dr. Carroll said. "However, 
it is our feeling that this program 
can render great educational op- 
portunities for those children who 
are economically and educationally 
deprived." 

Staff members of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction and 
the State Board of Education par- 
ticipated in two workshops at 
Raleigh Nov. 8-9 in preparation for 
consultative work on developing 
ESEA projects and programs. 



SuftesUatestdent Ga/incll Sayl . . . 

(Excerpts from address at unveiling of historical marker at Waynesville, Sept. 23, 1965) 

It is not necessary that we recite here today much of the chronology of events 
which led the pioneers of our profession to this spot. . . . We can, however, extract 
from the documents of that day the concerns, the problems, and the issues, which 
provided our predecessors with the incentive for action. ... A review of these . . . 
convinces us that our kin were here in June 1884 when the North Carolina Teachers' 
Assembly was organized! . . . 

But those who were here in 1884 did not spend their time reminiscing; instead, 
they wrestled with contemporary issues and sought solutions which they believed 
would ultimately advance the cause of public education in North Carolina. Lest we 
be derelict in our faithfulness to their dream, let us identify some of the fundamental 
problems of our day which beg of answers: 

First, there is a loud clamor throughout our State for more teachers and adminis- 
trators and even greater clamor for more teachers and administrators who will adven- 
ture in the realms of imaginative and creative leadership. This is the day of experimen- 
tation and innovation with little place for the timid and the traditional. Time is 
running out on ignorance and educators are holding the stopwatch. Old woys of doing 
things must yield to the tempo of scientific and technological change. We cannot win 
this final round unless we are able to secure enough qualified teachers, special service 
personnel, and administrators to staff the schools around the clock around the year. 

In the second place, we must resolve — and quickly, I think — the question of 
responsibility for and control of public education. With the advent of federal interest 
in education, we have witnessed a confusing array of isolated and unrelated federally- 
supported educational programs with varying and sometimes strange administrative 
parentage. We have long held that the Federal government should become a partner 
in financing education, but we have, simultaneously, contended that education is a 
State function. Now we observe patterns of authority emerging which are foreign to 
our beliefs about school organization and administration. Not one, but several. 
Federal and State agencies are now organizing and administering educational pro- 
grams. At the local level, boards of education are being challenged by federally- 
financed community action agencies, some of which have more money at their dis- 
posal than legally constituted boards of education. Federal, State, and local relation- 
ships and responsibilities must be defined — and again, I say, quickly — if education 
is to survive as a coherently developed system in which all levels of government can 
take pride. 

Our third concern is related to the second. Almost daily now, through communic- 
ations and conferences, we feel the imminence of National persuasion in areas such 
as curriculum, testing, and standards. Unlimited financial resources seem to be 
available for the purpose of persuading teachers of biology, physics, mathematics, 
and English to accept methods and materials which have been "cooperatively 
developed" by a "national" committee. This trend may have possibilities for improving 
instruction, but any trend which might ultimately lead to a unified and centralized 
curriculum merits careful scrutiny if we are to preserve our respect for democratic 
differences. 

Fourth and finally, we must bring about a marriage between our profession and 
society in general. There is no doubt but that the teaching profession is the salt which 
can cure and preserve our society, but unless this salt can find its way into the 
deep dark crevices of humanity the spoilage may eventually overcome us. We need 
courses in the methods of teaching but we also need experience in the methods of 
mankind. For too long we have concerned ourselves with the world of children and 
have forgotten the world of adults. There is little doubt but that the master teacher 
of tomorrow will be one who is conversant with, and is a part of, the adult mind. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, 
V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKM4N 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

There are as many kinds of good 
teaching as there are good apples, 
good times, or good women. Ap- 
preciating one kind of good apple, 
good time or good woman does not 
make all other kinds bad. — Don 
Robinson 



Scott's Ivanhoe has a passage 
pointing out that in feudal days 
barnyard animals were called by 
their Anglo-Saxon names — cow, 
calf, sheep, pig. But when they 
were dressed for the table they 
were served as beef, veal, mutton 
and pork, all Norman designations. 
By the same token, when educators 
are among themselves they speak 
of pupils, test, teacher or textbook. 
But when talking in public, they 
refer to them as student personnel, 
evaluative instruments, faculty 
members and instructional ma- 
terial. — Southern Illinois Schools 



Youngsters aren't what they 
used to be. They never are. Each 
generation has its own outlook, its 
own problems, its own environ- 
ment. Obvious as this may sound, 
parents tend to forget it. One ex- 
pert who studied over 1,000 auto- 
biographies of college students 
writes, "The youth of today has 
faced more moral alternatives by 
the time he is 20 years of age than 
his grandparents faced in a life- 
time." — Changing Times 



The greatest discovery of my 
generation is that human beings 
can alter their lives by altering 
their attitudes of mind. — William 
James 



CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 
Vol. XXX, N«. 3 



November 1965 



A principal kept for ready use a 
special notebook with the label, 
"Complaints of teachers against 
other teachers." When a member 
of the faculty began to talk of the 
faults of fellow teachers, he would 
say, "Here's my complaint book. 
I'll write down what you say, and 
you can sign it. Then when I 
handle the matter officially, I shall 
know at a glance what you will be 
ready to testify to." . . . The prin- 
cipal says he kept the book for 40 
years, -opened it many, many times, 
and never wrote a line in it. — M. 
Dale Baughman 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



laLzli and Jdiheh 



lUe. J>aU lUo*d. 



Stereotyping is an unhappy habit 
of humankind which is, alas, too 
easily reinforced by professional 
jargon. This is particularly the 
case with terms indicating some 
sort of deprivation or lack, such 
as "dropout," "culturally disadvan- 
taged" or "underachiever." Attach- 
ing one of these too — convenient 
terms to an individual is not un- 
likely to cast a spell, transferring 
to Mm the negativity of the con- 
cept. Already, in the popular mind, 
the never-too-happy term "drop- 
out" has come to signify a person 
who is a loser, a failure, a misfit. 
It has become a label which libels 
whomever it is attached to, and 
the evangelical tone of many dis- 
cussions of the "dropout problem" 
uncomfortably reflects a division 
of the "saved" and the "doomed." 

Easy Transition 

Educators in particular should 
be constantly on guard against this 
all-too-human tendency to libel with 
a label. It is too short and easy a 
jump from labeling someone as a 
"problem student" to regarding 
him as "just a problem." Un- 
fortunately, it is also too easy to 
slide from labeling someone as 
"culturally disadvantaged," into a 
condescending attitude which can 
wreck attempts to remedy a specific 
situation. 

No doubt it is difficult to combine 
clinical detachment with appreci- 
ation of individuality. One of the 
everlasting problems of the teacher 
is to resist becoming over-involved 
with students as individuals and 
at the same time to resist "pigeon- 
holding" them. To be constantly 
aware of this problem, yet not 
overly concerned by it, is a mark of 
maturity. 

Linked With Anxiety 

School administrators face the 
same basic problem in their attitu- 
des toward staff and faculty mem- 
bers — but here the difficulty is to 
avoid regarding the individual 
principally as a cog or a wheel in 
the machine, and on the other hand 
to recognize that it is impossible 
to do full justice to all individuals. 



Perhaps the key to the whole 
problem of stereotyping or "libel- 
ing with labels" is, as some psycho- 
logists have pointed out, in the 
person's attitude toward himself — 
whether he is satisfied or over- 
anxious about his own individual- 
ity. Honest introspection may well 
support this thesis: it is when we 
feel overconcerned about our own 
status that we tend to stereotype 
others. 



Winston Churchill, furious at 
fussy corrections made by an editor 
in one of his manuscripts, scribbled 
the following retort after a penciled 
change in the position of a termi- 
nal preposition: 

"This is the sort of pedantry up 
with which I will not put!" 



&u% PiiceledA Qijjt ta Ganv&tf, 



A plea by a Tar Heel college 
president to "send us students who 
can read and write" drew the 
attention of a group of educators 
recently to the central importance 
of language skills and the responsi- 
bility of every teacher to help in 
the development of these skills. 

"Tell yourself, 'He'll catch up 
with history when I get him to read 
well,' " Dr. Leo Jenkins, president 
of East Carolina College told a 
group of classroom teachers at an 
NCEA district meeting. The high 
mortality rate of college students 
is due in large measure to poor 
English preparation, he stated. 

While facility in language and 
facility in thought are not precisely 
equivalent, lack of ability to express 
one's thoughts clearly may appear 
a symptom of unclear thinking, 
carelessness or clumsiness in ex- 
pression as a sign of intellectual 
shoddiness or ineptness. 

Thought and Language 

Thought is so closely bound up 
with language that one leading 
modern philosopher has insisted 
that if a person doesn't have the 
words for it, then he doesn't have 
the concept. Anthropologists and 
philologists have been insisting for 
some decades that certain cultural 
"blind spots" are linked with the 
grammatical limitations of a peo- 
ple's language. One of the marks 
of a civilized man is the ability to 
express himself well, to use appro- 
priate language in various contexts, 
and to perceive the subtle differ- 



ences in usage of words which have 
approximately the same meanings. 

Failures in other disciplines, Dr. 
Jenkins remarked, can often be 
traced to failure or near failure in 
English. Surely a student who has 
not gained mastery of his native 
language is poorly equipped to 
wrestle with the subleties of more 
complex idioms, the precise dis- 
tinctions of scientific terminology 
or the nuances of an alien tongue. 

Every Teacher's Duty 

The public schools must surely 
accept a good part of the blame 
for the poor linguistic preparation 
of such a large share of college 
students. As Dr. Jenkins suggests, 
it is every teacher's responsibility 
to encourage the linguistic develop- 
ment of each student in his classes, 
and this means calling attention to 
errors in grammar, punctuation, 
spelling, and usage. It also means 
setting an example. There is a kind 
of condescension in assuming a 
"poorer" type of expression than 
one is capable of using, in accept- 
ing habitually the lowest common 
linquistic denominator in com- 
municating with various groups 
and individuals. It may well signal 
a lack of respect, rather than a 
genuine effort to assure interchange 
of ideas. 

Language is, after all, one of the 
greatest treasures of mankind, and 
English one of the richest lan- 
guages. To make this precious gift 
available, really available, to a child 
or youth is one of the finest 
achievements of any teacher. 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



- 



NCEA District Conventions Feature Panel Review Superintendent Named 
Of Economic, Educational Deprivation in State 



Three panelists from the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
drew a disturbing picture of the 
dimensions of economic and edu- 
cational deprivation in North Caro- 
lina for thousands of teachers at- 
tending the 10 district conventions 
of the N. C. Education Association 
in September and October. 

"We as a profession must mobi- 
lize all our resources and declare 
war on economic and educational 
deprivation in our State," declared 
J. Everette Miller, assistant State 
superintendent of public instruc- 
tion, in summing up the panel's 
presentation on the Convention 
theme: "Education Sufficient for 
our Times." 

The other two panelists for the 
streamlined general sessions were 
Nile F. Hunt, director of the Divi- 
sion of Instructional Services, and 
Charles Keels, assistant State su- 
pervisor of Vocational Agriculture. 

New Directions 

Recently initiated Federal pro- 
grams, Miller stated, make it ap- 
parent that "we shall in the years 
ahead, concentrate on those chil- 
dren in our classrooms and com- 
munities who are economically 
disadvantaged and educationally 
deprived." He quoted several pas- 
sages from President Johnson's 
book, My Hope for America, set- 
ting forth the basic philosophy un- 
derlying this new direction. 

Census figures show that one out 
of every four children in North 
Carolina between the ages of 5 and 
17 is economically or educationally 
disadvantaged. Only one other state 
has more children in this category, 
Miller stated. 

Among the statistical "indict- 
ments" brought to the attention of 
the teachers by the panelists were 
the following: 

Indicators of Need 

• North Carolina has 126,800 
families, or 11.6 percent of its pop- 
ulation, living on less than $1,000 
a year. 



• Median family income for 
whites in North Carolina is $4,588; 
for nonwhites, $1,922. The national 
average is $5,660. 

• There are 23 welfare cases 
handled per month per 1,000 popu- 
lation in North Carolina. 

• There is a very high propor- 
tion of inadequate housing units; 
42 percent are either structurally 
unsound or lack adequate plumbing 
facilities. 

• Each day, 121,000 children go 
to schools in North Carolina with- 
out breakfast, and 300,000 cannot 
afford lunches. 

• North Carolina ranks 45th 
among the States in median years 
of schooling completed. 

• Only 57 percent of the State's 
ninth grade students complete high 
school. 

• Sixty-five percent of North 
Carolina's Selective Service regis- 
trants are rejected for military 
service. 

• Some 71,000 students fail to be 
promoted each year in North Caro- 
lina. 

Areas of Progress 

Miller also cited a number of 
areas of progress within the past 
few years, including the following: 

• Increases in beginning teach- 
ers' salaries from $322 a month in 
1960 to $436 a month this year. 

• Six times as many special edu- 
cation teachers today as six years 
ago. 

• No attendance counselors in 
1960, as compared with 142 today. 

• No assistant superintendents 
in 1962, as compared with 93 to- 
day. 

Calls for Reorientation 

Dealing with the problems of the 
disadvantaged requires consider- 
able reorientation in thinking on 
the part of educators, Hunt de- 
clared. Our educational system is 
oriented to the middle class with 
the goal being to make students 
"just like us." This process, he 
said, is "tragically slow, painful, 
and seemingly unrewarding and un- 
successful. . . . 



Franklin L. Britt, principal of 
Central School in Pasquotank 
County, was named superintendent 
of Pasquotank County Schools, 
succeeding the late J. H. Moore, 
who died in August. 

Britt's appointment to the post 
was approved by the State Board 
of Education at its October meet- 
ing. 

"The result: dropouts, fugitives 
from failure, welfare clients," he 
stated. "A child nurtured in the 
disadvantaged milieu is not pre- 
pared to compete in the middle 
class school system." 

"The public school's overriding 
first order of business in the area 
of educational deprivation," Hunt 
declared, "is to seek to understand 
other culture values, processes and 
circumstances, and to redesign 
curricula, programs and services 
to use these advantageously in edu- 
cating children, rather than using 
them to make children over to fit 
our own concepts and ways of 
doing things." 

Fees, Failures 

Fees charged in a great many of 
our schools "constitute a barrier to 
the disadvantaged," he observed. A 
disadvantaged family with several 
children simply cannot afford to 
pay fees for special courses such 
as music, art, home economics, bus- 
iness education, and industrial arts. 

Hunt then turned to the "com- 
pounding failure phenomenon." 

"Nonpromotion does not serve 
the welfare of the child," he de- 
clared. "All too often it makes the 
child the scapegoat for our own — 
the school's — failures. 

"This is not a plea for mediocrity 
or automatic promotions," he said, 
but for "a new design in education 
which focuses on learning by pupils 
— all pupils . . . and that does not 
permit deprivation of any group." 

Miller followed up the review of 
needs and problems with an outline 
of the basic provisions of the 
Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act, listing a number of types 
of projects and programs which 
could be started by local school ad- 
ministrative units under the Act. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



improvement in Tar Heel School Food Services 
Seen as Result of Legislation, New Policies 



School food services in North 
Carolina are moving toward great- 
er uniformity in practices, more 
widespread provision of nutrition- 
ally adequate lunches for all stu- 
dents and reduced-price or free 
lunches for the economically dis- 
advantaged, improved facilities, 
and improved wage scales for 
lunchroom personnel. 

Lee Searing, State supervisor of 
School Food Services, commented 
that groundbreaking legislation en- 
acted by the 1965 General Assem- 
bly will open the way for improve- 
ments in these and other areas. 
About $2 million may eventually be 
added to funds for school lunches 
by this legislation, he stated. 

Law Revamped 

The rewritten basic statute (GS 
115-51) restricts the use of school 
food service operating funds to 
"cost of operation" alone, defining 
this as "actual costs incurred in 
the purchase and preparation of 
food, the salaries of personnel di- 
rectly engaged in preparing and 
serving food, and the costs of such 
inexpensive and expendable non- 
food supplies as outlined under 
standards adopted by the State 
Board of Education." 

The revamped law also requires 
that all school food services "made 
available under this authority shall 
be provided in accordance with 
standards and regulations recom- 
mended by the State Superinten- 
dent of Public Instruction and ap- 
proved by the State Board of Edu- 
cation." 

Shift in Philosophy 

The philosophy behind the new 
legislation and policies, Searing 
explained, is that the child should 
not have to pay for lunchroom 
equipment or administrative ser- 
vices. Heretofore, the philosophy 
generally has been that the child 
should support the cost of school 
food services and that the program 
should be a self-sustaining opera- 
tion. 



"This was too large a burden on 
the child's money," he observed. 
"After all, a child doesn't pay for 
his desk or school bus, and there 
is no better reason why he should 
be required to subsidize basic food 
service expenses." 

Regulations Published 

The State Board approved poli- 
cies and standards for the adminis- 
tration of school food services, in 
line with the new legislation, at its 
September meeting. These policies 
and procedures are set forth in a 
guide distributed last month to all 
administrative units. 

The publication includes the 
rules, regulations, policies, and 
procedures adopted by the Board 
on Sept. 2; descriptions of the Na- 
tional School Lunch and Special 
Milk Programs and requirements 
for participation in these; types of 
school food services which may be 
operated ; a summary index to 
State laws and policies relating to 
School food service; recommenda- 
tions regarding the sale of "extra" 
items, such as confections and soft 
drinks, in school lunchrooms; a 
concise list of basic references, and 
other information. 

Tar Heel Schools Observe 

National School Lunch Week 

Marking the nineteenth year 
that schools across the country 
have been serving students hearty 
noonday lunches with the help of 
the National School Lunch Pro- 
gram, President Lyndon B. John- 
son proclaimed the week of October 
10-16 "National School Lunch 
Week." 

Governor Dan K. Moore joined 
the President in recognizing the 
contribution of the School Lunch 
Program to the health and well- 
being of the State's public school 
students by designating that week 
as "School Lunch Week in North 
Carolina." 

(Continued on page 15) 



Governor Names Members 
Of Textbook Commission 

Governor Dan K. Moore an- 
nounced on October 13 the appoint- 
ment of 10 new members to the 
State Textbook Commission and 
the reappointment of two members. 

The Textbook Commission mem- 
bers, under State law, are ap- 
pointed by the Governor to four- 
year terms upon the recommenda- 
tion of the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. 

George S. Willard, superinten- 
dent of Wilson City School, was 
named to succeed P. J. Weaver, 
superintendent of Greensboro City 
Schools, as chairman. The two re- 
appointed members are Joseph Q. 
Holliday, principal of Needham 
Broughton High School, Raleigh, 
and Mrs. Catherine D. Penny, a 
teacher in the Durham City 
Schools. Both are in the High 
School Division of the Commission. 

The Elementary Division mem- 
bers are Miss Martha G. Johnston, 
principal of Eastover School in 
Mecklenburg County, who succeeds 
Mrs. Helen R. Marvin of Gastonia; 
Mrs. Georgia Smith Franklin, a 
teacher in the Greenville City 
Schools, succeeding Mrs. N. D. 
Clark of Asheville; C. M. King, 
director of instruction in the Hen- 
dersonville City Schools, who suc- 
ceeds Miss Reba Proctor of Rocky 
Mount; Mrs. Inez C. Leivallen, 
principal of Charles W. McCrary 
School, Asheboro, who succeeds 
Clyde Pressley of Leaksville-Spray ; 
Miss Hazel Perritt, a teacher in the 
Greensboro City Schools, who suc- 
ceeds Miss Elizabeth Putnam of 
Boone; and Mrs. Margaret Bird 
Rentz, a teacher in the Swain 
County Schools, who succeeds Miss 
Mary B. Thompson of Charlotte. 

High School Division members 
are Holliday, Mrs. Penny, Henry C. 
McFadyen, principal of Lenoir 
High School, who succeeds Mrs. 
Sarah H. Richbourg of Lumberton ; 
Mrs. Virginia Hill Mickey, a teach- 
er in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth 
Schools, who succeeds Mrs. Doro- 
thy Y. Zimmerman of Yanceyville; 
and Mrs. Mary Wyche Mintz, a 
teacher in the Columbus County 
Schools. 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



First Portion of $100 Million Bond Issue Funds 
Distributed to Tar Heel City and County Units 



Funds derived from the Septem- 
ber sale of $25 million in public 
school construction bonds by the 
State — the first portion of the $100 
million bond issue approved by Tar 
Heel voters last fall — are now 
being distributed to local adminis- 
trative units which have had their 
construction plans approved by the 
State Board of Education. 

Dr. J. L. Pierce, director of the 
Division of School Planning, State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
said that 74 local administrative 
units, both county and city, had 
had their long-range plans ap- 
proved and 36 units had submitted 
a total of 74 applications for the 
bond issue funds to the Board by 
its November meeting. 

Most Plans Passed 

"Most of the plans submitted 
have been approved in toto," Dr. 
Pierce said. The plans are first 
submitted to the State Review 
Panel, which reviews them and 
makes its recommendations to the 
Board's Building Committee for 
consideration prior to the final ac- 
tion by the Board. 

Projects covered in the applica- 
tions submitted to the Board by 
its November meeting would re- 
quire expenditure of $18,139,429.79 
in State funds and $9,679,598.62 in 
local funds, or a total of over $27.8 
million, the School Planning direc- 
tor stated. 

First consideration in the plan- 
ning of projects is being given to 
relieving overcrowded conditions, 
replacing obsolete, improvised, un- 
sanitary and unsafe facilities, and 
providing basic facilities essential 
to an adequate school program. 

Steps in Planning 

Getting a project approved re- 
quires a lot of paperwork, both for 
local administrators and State staff 
members. A State survey, a system- 
wide evaluation, and compilation of 
long-range plans and needs are 
among the things required to qual- 



ify for the unit's allotted share of 
the bond issue funds. 

The legislation enacted by the 
1963 General Assembly calling for 
the State bond issue referendum 
provides that the money shall be 
distributed to the county and city 
school administrative units on the 
basis of the per capita average 
daily membership for the 1961-62 
school year, subject to approval of 
the plans for expenditure of the 
unit's share by the State Board of 
Education. 



Lassiter Presented Citation 
By President's Committee 

Robert A. Lassiter, director of 
the Vocational Rehabilitation Divi- 
sion, State Department of Public 
Instruction, was presented a Cita- 
tion for Meritorious Service from 
the President's Committee on Em- 
ployment of the Handicapped at the 
annual meeting of the Governor's 
Committee on Employment of the 
Handicapped held in High Point 
Sept. 8. 



Business Educators Hold First State Conference 



Three nationally-recognized au- 
thorities in the field of business 
education were featured speakers 
at the first Statewide Business Ed- 
ucation Conference, Oct. 29-30 at 
Charlotte. 

"The New Look in Business Ed- 
ucation" was the theme of the con- 
ference, which drew some 250 high 
school and college educators to the 
sessions at East Mecklenburg High 
School. 

Cosponsors for the event were 
the Business Education Depart- 
ment of the N. C. Education Asso- 
ciation and the State Department 
of Public Instruction. 

Principal Speakers 

Kicking off the activities was an 
evening buffet in the school cafe- 
teria, with an address by Godfrey 
Elliott, general manager of the 
Gregg Division, McGraw-Hill Pub- 
lishnig Co., on the topic "Your 
Challenge for Tomorrow." Elliott 
is an authority on educational 
media. 

"Changing Patterns in Business 
Education" was the theme of an 
address by Arthur L. Walker, pro- 
fessor of business, Richmond Pro- 
fessional Institute, and former 
director of Business and Office Ed- 
ucation for the State of Virginia. 

Dr. Harry Huffman, president 
of the National Business Education 



Association, delivered the closing 
address at a luncheon session, dis- 
cussing "Seventeen New Pointers 
for Business Teachers." He is a 
specialist in business education on 
the staff of Ohio State University's 
Center for Research and Develop- 
ment in Vocational Technical Edu- 
cation, and is the author of a 
variety of textbooks in the field. 

Group Meetings 

Group meetings following the 
Saturday general session focused 
on a number of interest areas, with 
presentations and demonstrations 
on the following topics: multiple 
listening shorthand classroom; 
data processing in the high school 
program; Diamond Jubilee short- 
hand presentation ; Cooperative Of- 
fice Occupations Program, and 
Preparatory Office Education Pro- 
gram, as well as demonstrations of 
several types of the latest office 
machines. 

Miss D. Macil Via, supervisor of 
Business Education, State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction was a 
member of the Planning Commit- 
tee for the conference and presided 
at the closing general session. 

Ruth B. Jones, president of 
NCEA's Business Department, was 
in charge of coordinating the con- 
ference program and presided at 
the first two sessions. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Hairr Named Supervisor 

Of Vocational Agriculture 

Appointment of Vaden B. Hairr 
to succeed A. G. Bullard as State 
Supervisor of Vocational Agricul- 
ture in the Division of Vocational 
Education was announced by Dr. 
Carroll early in October. Hairr as- 
sumed his new duties Oct. 8. 

He joined the State Vocational 
Agriculture staff in February 1961 
as a district supervisor, with re- 
sponsibility for supervising pro- 
grams in 25 Northeastern counties. 
(In 1964-65, the district supervis- 
ors were redesignated as assistant 
State supervisors.) 

Former Teacher 

A native of Sampson County, 
Hairr is a graduate of Piney Grove 
High School and N. C. State Col- 
lege and holds the master's degree 
in Agricultural Education from 
N. C. State. He has also done addi- 
tional graduate work at NCSU. 

His farming experience includes 
working on the family farm to age 
16, carrying out supervised prac- 
tice programs in livestock and 
crops while enrolled in high school 
vocational agriculture courses, and 
working with the ASC during vaca- 
tions while in college. 

He was teacher of vocational ag- 
riculture at Jamesville High School 
in Martin County for nearly 20 
years before joining the State staff. 
In this position, he organized and 
supervised Rural War Production 
Training Programs, Veteran Farm- 
er Training Programs and a Com- 
munity Cannery. He served a term 
as mayor of Jamesville in 1959. 

Diverse Activities 

As a district supervisor, he 
edited the Department's publica- 
tion Guide for Planning Buildings, 
Facilities, and Equipment for Vo- 
cational Education in Agriculture; 
assisted in development and prep- 
aration of 13 curriculum guides 
and several other publications, in- 
cluding a supervised practice rec- 
ord book; served as chairman of 
various State staff committees; 
coordinated State Land Judging 
Meets and Vocational Agriculture 



Interstate Education Pact Drive Moves Ahead 
As Conference Gives Nod to Draft of Agreement 



Former Governor Terry Sanford 
was the presiding officer at a two- 
day conference of political and edu- 
cational leaders from every state 
who assembled Sept. 29 at Kansas 
City to hammer out a draft of the 
proposed Interstate Compact for 
Education. 

After the group voted over- 
whelmingly in favor of creating 
the compact, Sanford told the dele- 
gates he thought the interstate 
agreement could be a reality by 
Christmas. 

Pledges Received 

He said 15 governors already had 
agreed in writing to adhere to the 
provisions of the compact, 29 more 
governors or their representatives 
had indicated they intend to ad- 
here, and several others had indi- 
cated they probably would. 

exhibits at the N. C. State Fair; 
and coordinated a weekly TV pro- 
gram on vocational agriculture 
over WNCT, Greenville. 

Organization Work 

Over the years, Hairr has main- 
tained a continuing active role in 
various professional, farming, and 
civic organizations, having served 
as a District Governor of Ruritan 
National; District Chairman and 
Executive Committee member, 
East Carolina Council, Boy Scouts 
of America, and as a participant 
for several years in regional and 
national conferences on Vocational 
Agricultural Education. 

This year, he is a curriculum 
writer for the National Center for 
Advanced Study and Research in 
Vocational Education, and he took 
part in the Southern Regional Con- 
ference on Off-Farm Agricultural 
Occupations. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hairr (she is the 
former Eleanor Jenkins of Aulan- 
der) and their 14-year-old daugh- 
ter reside in Garner. He is super- 
intendent of the First Baptist 
Church Sunday School there and a 
deacon. 



The proposed compact, as worked 
out at the conference, must be rati- 
fied or approved by at least 10 
states to make it official. 

It will establish an "educational 
commission of states" made up of 
seven representatives of each of 
the 50 states and four U. S. terri- 
tories. While it will have no regu- 
latory powers, the commission will 
be charged with making studies, 
collecting data, and making recom- 
mendations to its member states 
and the Federal government. 

Steering Group 

The conference selected a 27- 
member interim steering commit- 
tee, which is "empowered to accept 
and expand funds, to employ a di- 
rector and other staff members, to 
select a headquarters site, to pre- 
sent and explain the compact to the 
various governors and state legis- 
lative bodies, and generally to as- 
sume the task of creating such a 
compact." 

Sanford said he has pledges of 
financial support for early stages 
of the compact operations from 
several foundations. The planning 
conference at Kansas City was 
financed by the Carnegie Corpora- 
tion of New York, which with the 
Ford Foundation is underwriting a 
study being conducted by Sanford 
regarding the operations of state 
governments and interstate cooper- 
ative efforts. 

Sparked by Conant 

The idea of the interstate com- 
pact was broached by Dr. James B. 
Conant last November in his book 
Shaping Educational Policy. He ad- 
vocated the creation of a working 
agreement among the states to 
establish a "nationwide" educa- 
cational policy, rather than a "na- 
tional" policy established by Fed- 
eral agencies or a national body 
financed by Federal appropriations. 
Up to now, he declared, educational 
planning in this country has been 
proceeding on the basis of a hodge- 
podge of policies developed by a 
"jumble of influential private and 
public bodies" without sufficient co- 
ordination. 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



J 





o 


^t 




U> 


cr> 




o 


o* 










^^■i 


rH 




O 


'fl 




U 


a 




o 

c 


a 
> 

s 




w^m 


-J 










O 


2 
z 




£■ 


i! 




O 






U 


o 
s 

-1 


in 


j2 




u 


so 


*- 


«< 


o> 


k 


z 



to 

UJ 

> 

O 







o 

Z 



o 

U 

k 
U 



c 
'5 



c 

o 

U 





II 




0^500 


CD 


cjco^OHiflicocotooon 


CO 


Mill 




ooeo 1 1 




CO 


Ml! 






oo <P oo 


to 


TfU5(DOt-rHTP^t-"oioirH 


to 






Oi t-cp* 


ri 

CM 


tp 








rHrH CM 




rHCM CM tH CM *H tM 




Mill 




tp IOCD ] ' 


1-i 


1 II 1 




hjj 






























^ 




^-.--v 






















IC CO CM CO 


o 


coto-^fcoaiicococMOtr-c- 


3 






i^hO I 1 




o 


I i -"-* i 








t- CM t- O 


cn 


lOCMCMOCMrHirtCMCnC-OOCM 






lO COCM 




CO 


ioco 




i « 




Oi Cn TP CO 


I— < 


HlCHMH rH CM lC rH 


c-_ 


II 




CO rHT 


%, 


y$^ 


CM 




2b 


















1-1 


•** 


















c S 




oo «o^o 


iO 


OCOrHOOCOCOu-jCO^I'CrjrH 


DO 










t> 


' 




u a* 




CM O H,fl 


CO 


dddiocoiftdotooioiN 


id 










[> 


III']] 








m wtot- 


to 


OOCOtOC-COr-COCOOt-mCM 












CO 






tt. 6 








rH CM 














































oo to en irs 


CO 


NccoinojiocMoocomin 


t- 










c- 






fa 




CO Oi Oi to 


-tf 


CMCOCMl^CMCOlOirirHCMCnCM 


00 










CM 








lO Wt^H 


TP 


iC -^ CM rtH^< Tf CO Ol CO CO CM 


c^ 










cp„ 






- E 




■^ CO rH ,4 


rH 


HH^HM r-T 












TP 










■H 














CM 






e 




oo incom 


i— 1 


CO Cn •<# lOCO^TPCMCMmCO 


lO 


1 1 1 1 1 




TP CO tO O rH 


CO 


CM 


1 CO OO 








<£) .-1 CO ,-h. 


to 


CM rH OOtPCMOCOOiOCO 


rp 






O) -^P rH CM CO 




O 


rH rH CO 




s 




rH Cn CO_oO 


°i 


■^ CO lO tj< TfoOCS'^OlC 


o 






1/5 -^P rH CM CO 


c- 


O 






E 




r-T r-TT-Tr-T 


CO* 


1 ^p" rH rH 










CM 


o 






« 




















CM 






wU 


















































u. 






























O CO rHlQ 


CM 


lA^^^COMWOlOHWiM 


CO 


^^— v.— .--v^-^ 




Tp CO to CTl rH 


CO 


rH 


o cn t-io 




1 




CO OMh 


t- 


TP Ciinir3,tr-;OrHt-C0C>O(N 


f 


W^COOC/) 




05 "^P rH CM CO 




CO 


t- ^p t-cn 






rH 00l>00 


*"*.. 


~°. 




IC ^P rH CM CO 


1- 


IC 


-t ^ CM rH 




H 




CO~ CI "*P rH 


cn 

CM 


CO"cO tr- t-H rH CM*" rH CO i— ( rH 


CM 








CJ 


cn 


L 




« 




o lO W I 


t— 


c-cnocMt-mcoTpcoiocom 








cn cm co 1 | 


c- 


ID 


| CD Tp 1 








iC CM CM 


o> 


ooaitr-rHc-^tr-cpTticotDCn 


I— 1 






co oo en 




CM 






a 




cm wq 


t-_ 


HN TpiCinrHCOOOt-ClO^ 


iO 






CM CM CO 


CM 


ua 






E 
E 




rH rH rH I 


CO 


rH rH 


oo' 








rH 


CO* 


. 




•»u 


























h 




IQ 00 OS ^-v 


CM 


OOOOCMCTlQOlOrHOOrHOO^O 


CM 






cn cm co "**.—. 


c- 




1 CO CM II 




| 




ifl t-^w 


00 


t^-CMt-rHCTiCTi^lCmCOCDrH 


o 


WWWCJW 




coco cn^; >7 

CM CM CO 2,12, 




o 


AXf 






r-< CO N -Ct 


« 


oa ^ *^ wui o5 rH ^o ^p en ih 


to 






ri 


'"i 


rH CM fl 




H 




CM CO"rjT 


in 

CM 


Co'co" rH CD t-Tcm'i-TcM f-^ 


CM 










CM 






o 




CM OCM -^ 


-tf 


cor-^^cnxcooiooo^c- 


en 


HOOJOH 








tp 






2 1 




lit, iTi Ol ^ 


CM 

o 


HtonQa>t-Hio]Hic-nH 




C- CO C? CO ic 

CO CD CD CM 


CM 


2r?£S£ 




o 










co* ^"n 


oo" 


H(M* ^ CM* t-7 rH 


lO 




rH 






LG> 


1 1 1 M 






















CO 




co 


























I 


ft 


























O 




















































H 
















































-J 


l 




















« 


*fl 




H 




















o 


H 


C" ^ i 


GO 

z 




^. 


>> 




s 


"rt 




"rt 






o 




Q 

a 

H 

M 

o 

Oh 

-. 

P 

op 

■q 

Fh 




1 

> 

a 

I 

eg 

e 

B 

o 
U 


UNC at Chapel Hill 
N. C. State Universi 
UNC at Greensboro 
UNC at Charlotte 


o 
H 

"5 

u 
V 

'S 


Senior Colleges 

Agric. and Technica 

Appalachian 

Asheville-Biltmore 

Charlotte 

East Carolina 

Elizabeth City 

Fayetteville 

N. C. College, Durha 

Pembroke 

Western Carolina 

Wilmington 

Winston-Salem 


o 

H 

0^ 

*o 


h 

o 

"S 


Junior Colleges 

Asheville-Biltmore 
Charlotte 
Wilmington 
Carver 

Williston 


O 

£h 
hO 

.2 

'c 
3 


Community Colleges 

Central Piedmont 

College of Albemarle 

Gaston 

Sandhills 

Southeastern 


* 

"c 

c 

3 

E 
E 

o 



w 

O 

u 


Military Centers 

Fort Bragg (N. C. S 
Camp Lejeune (ECC 
Seymour Johnson (E 



Z 


-(J 
u 
O 


a 

03 


o 


K 


00 






O) 



so 
os 



03 'to 



.5 > 



co O _L 

at <v 

a s « 



^5 -B t? fl 

01 ^3 o3 



> s 



CO 



C 

o> 

s <» 
a ba 

o <u 

03 
03 S 

+■ S3 

Q O 
H ol 

a 



G 
O) 

o 
03 O) 

OO 

Jh CO 

a) m 



p. 



fl 


TJ 


<D 


0) 


SJ 


00 




ai 


0) 


<1> 


-1-^ 


!m 


OS 


U 


be 


c 


ai 






no 


o 


o3 


CJ 


mC 



5m P3 
<NJ to 



LO 

0i to 
3 OS 
co i"4 

Oca 
._ -»h a> 

2 (M 13 

^~t to 

^2"fl 

03 b ?0 
o3 o 



0) fl 
nfl O 

^•43 

>, oj 

■s§, 



co J3 
C 3 
•"■ P. 

'oj t£ 



CD CD 
5m 



- c 

C o3 

8 ^ 



crt 


Sm 


C 


ai 

> 


O 


o 


5m 




03 


C>4 


U 


00 


-fl 


■n 1 


+j 


o 



fl e w 



!-s fe § 



2^ 
fl.^f 



o 

r5 

be fl 



i — ! ert r\ r3 



rt <H 

-fl ° 
CO 

e 
q 
b 

rfl fl 

CO +J 





OO 


a> 


00 


+j 


iH 


rri 




'» 


t- 




C£> 


Sm 




P. 

TJ 


s 

n 


ti 


Sm 


ai 


«M 



c 

oj . 
Sh 

fl S 

"? ^ 

r" +J 

co 



.2 h 

5m a) 

CP > 

ft O 

^S 
cy ~ 
>iH 
i^ 
> <4-l 

«fl O 






o3 fl 

8s 

o -fl 
o3 +* 

0) fl 

Jfl •-' 



03 CM 

.5 5 

p CTs" 

O o 



5m "^< 
O <N 

^ °° 

■8 th 



c S o 

_, C CO Sm 

G S 5m «tH 

fe O Q) 

fl P 'S 73 

TX CL) M 

CO « j-j 

CO cp 



<:s^ 



o3 



a> 
CO 

oS 
0) 
5m 

a> o 
*J fl 

03 -fl 



fi«|3 

•ph co 

0) 

2 p 5 

° C 

to .fl R 

•Th cg 

c3^ S 

lO **- 
O -fl co 

to +" *a> 



* § 

-fl * 

^ 5m 

o 



a 9S 

Si-* 



t3 -a a) o 

CP 0) 5m rH 

■+J +J — 

03 C 

T3 fl 

'-fl O 

CO S 

fl rt 

O Sm 

O 3 

CP 

cp >> 

-fl ^ 

+» 00 

Sm-A" 
O ^ 
*H ^ 

1> & 
CO O 

o co 

C Sm 
• rt CP 

> 
cp .-< 

HP 



ba 


CP 


c 


fl' 


TJ 




oj 


U 

5m 
C 




CP 


CO 


CP 


CO 


o 


T-H 


Sm 




c« 


O 


-fl 
O 



fl CP 

O 

CP 

cp ±j 

^^ 

-b-fl 
§° 

cp 

c fl 



cp co 

co o3 

o3 > 

cp > 

o co 

5m >,n 



fl o 

CP W 

| -a 

5m 5m 



fl 

■fl to 

T3 o3 

o3 cp 

Sh . 

. O -4J 

■S C fl 

C "* cp 

a> . fl 

Cj 5m fl 

54 Oifl 

cp cp o 

P. >> Sm 



_ O 

CP P. 

P 

<fH 3 

O co 

CP >< 

■+j ca 

03 -i^ 
Sm 
CP 

CP -fl 

-c 3 s 

H Jm 

o 



i cp 

>* 
tfl^ 

fl "H 



Sm ■♦* 

O 03 

M-> 

1m 

■a «« 

S ** 



1.! 

c< ! 



co 

CP ' 

bo ' 
a; 

o 

CJ 



Sm 
P 



H rH I ^ H •H tH I CO tH ^h »h 



^5 -rf CO iC 00 



Ot-NNOXt-HNOOinTjOi 
tH I CM 



lOOOlft!C | TjiO'ONI>HTl'T)'OOC-Jil>WMiO 

coo6ooo«^io^c»aiasicoc>coc-'^^oot--[r- 

Ol^MHCO i-l CO CO M CO M N rH H tJ" ■** 



CONlOH 
t-'' 00 td irt 



^lONOCOOCOXNNcOCOtOC-HNON^NH | OS lO lO CO 
jHtOOirtN^aOO^NO^mOiajHCDCDtDO NOOOOl 

jhhhin oirt m^cMcorHCMr-itom coco cm co 



H rHCM iH 00 00 rH 



«O^COCOONWNlOCON(DWHHtD 

OS CM tO ^ © rH ** tD (D | CO C- ^* <N CO 

N 1h tH r-t rH 



co to ■** laooooot^incMoorHtoasoqoo 
od rH cm (Ldin^oocJaico'^rairrtoo 



tO ^ CO I iOOOCOtDHO)tCHDU2t-Ot- 
■** OS OS Ht>'M00(NHa5O(N^ l ^ , O 



HiOU) CO rH CO CM CM 



OWCOO 



■^ b" as ih in 

«5hi>co co 
finioN I 



O tH 



OS CM CO W CD OS I O^J'^'CO'd'lCT^iO'^'OSTj'OlOlOm^f'COTjHijl 
co m OS rH co t- inrHt^ascCrHooascOOSTPtOOSCOCMCMasCM© 
O H tO CM C- O00H5CHN COiHi— It-Ii— I CM 00 



©OSincOOSCJS^inOirHtOrHCMCM'rjicO 

tO -"a 1 OS tH CM OS CO CM TP I> CD -rf C- oo 

H tJI CO rH rH CO 



t-WNNH oHO'*I>IMe>liriHC-000'J'HI>lOH'l'H«£itCi 

Tpioo-^osrxiOto^ootDtoincMt^^iOrHinrHcocorHiricoas 

rt co t- ^ h (X O cnco wooicccoC'Cooooo<oaioiaiooiot>o: 

rH ofrHto'rHrHrHrHrHrH <M* 



t-01(MC]OWC<li-(LD5DW(MT]<X00t0 
NC*t>C0Ht-OOCvlTfOt-00Ot-00 
W HHH(0«><0 , *M -«t CO (N CO (N tJi 



00 OS O I CDH 
CM rH TT asos 
00 CM •** CM 



I iniNcot-oicaia)[-coTj'i>c-'^(Dco-*03'^ 

t-tOC-CMCMt-Tj<CMrHCMCMCOt-O0aSCM00COas 

CD asas WNtNHCOHHN CM tO 



o f io co in Tf ai oi io h to 

lOOMHNONrHH lO 

rH CO rH CO rH rH 



a>inc-HOjoot£>LfiOcoHOOoo(NTfTjioTj«iflcoincj>cooHp5 

00rHt0asOC0©asCMC0'Xim--P HptN^H^^NOCOONW^ 

cm co to m o oo cp to wm to inqwr- coaotomooosasc-wt-as_ 

rH CM" rH to" rH rH rH rH rH* rH* CM 



rHmasoococ-asocMcotoasc— t- o^-v 
coioooorHtouocotomi^-asc^tomCM^ 

TPrHOSr-ilOtOmcOCM CO rH CM rH CM CO ►=< 



tOOOCMOOOOCOCMCMmas-^CS^tOtDOCMt-lCrp I W CD rH CO O 
CM-^i^J<TfCOTj<ir3t-TfcOCOino ( X>OOin-^ , COOOir3CO 00 CD CO O CM 

HNinusaioooioiNwcoHoocftioot-H ooto *<# t* m co "^ 



Hinoj ,-~.m t-asm^tfmostoasrHOoasm 
cooot-H (Osas^-rHO^CiOtDiratocot-as 

CO IC lO ^CJ Tjl N rH H CMrHCM CM t> CM 



oo as co oo 

CM -rf COOS r-t 
rH tO 






H 



;.: : 



i 91 
«0« 

V II 

o :■ 

III 
$\ 

• \ 
'•J 



■a H 



S a> « CS CQ A 3 
3B3 03OOQQ 



c oSf c 
.2 £ '3 -Sf -5 

BOOBh 



-a 



09 C 

1*1 



£ u 

o a) 

fas 



C 3 
>* r/1 T3 tU) 

V 3 C 3 H „, k 

f > [J m gj .^^1 • -tlS^O F 

<i'---J-:Jii 11 !i: 1 _;v»3+ J+ jrtj: ;> ^-. ^ 

►jjSSSZfeO'moitnBilSfc w 



KV of 



IS M bo j,s g, 

u O t-S c» 3-2 § §.* M S 3 

SocSM^JSSSOfttoaMco 



s& _ 

.2 'EM a 

t^^ rH, c - 

iffin" !- Eh 



K*t*C 



03 < 



> S « rt 
S o g w 

|| 8 g 



z 

o 

^ en 

Z " 

. »- 






z &■ 



8 J t <! 



5 e 
Ha 

o w 



§ a « 



ii 



«H CO Jh 


i 


O •« cS 


& 


<V <u 


> 




u 


03 Oj o> 


IH 


c3 « > 




2 »* 

u bo 


S 


ca 


r in 
colle 
The 


Sh 


03 <0 




£■& to 


r/3 


>>-^ <D 


03 


five- 
ding 
bas 


a> 

Sh 
O 

c 


= >> 




* Tj *m 


+J 


C c3 


S3 


»•" +" 


0) 


rcent 
,418, 
mili 


1 

'o 

Sh 


<u ia +* 


S3 


P.IM c8 


a> 



s s 

CO « 
O 

8.5 

£ SH 

bo i 

o ° 
3 a> 

J3 
T3 -H 
«" — 

o s fi 

3 S3 « 
SB O S. 

J u 

^? & Tf 

-2 ftt- 



w 

C4 



p. 2 



0) 

£.s 

41 
4J a) 

o.2 

S3 3 

O 3 

.2 ft 

Sh 

5 <» 

o S 

u 



5 B 

II 

m 03 
^-. c3 
rH ,B 

i o> 

rH Sh 



2 B « 
* 3 -^«B 

3 rH 
u -H «£) 

> o3 

o B w 
* J3 
o H 



3 03 

2 ft 

s s 






1-1 .^ 3 



03 o 
" 03 

ra ■•-> 

O cj 
O Sh 

O 03 

CQ-B 

03 

C5 03 

•*i ,B 



Sh .3 
03 -- 

-yfl a) 
s 3+i 
g ft S 

Sh "^ > 

rB ft 
■4-2 

>» 03 

Sh "H Sh 
03 O 

TJ T3 «M 
•53.2 B 
C fe rt 
° S hB 

o ft +j 



3 rt 
ft -i-? 

!_, B 

"^ *> 

TO (y 

t *H 
Sh q; 

o ft 

03^ 
»3 tH 

03 

Sh 03 

.S t* 

03 .2 



OS 

r-1 ^ 

03 

S s 
5.2 

Sh -|J 



CO tH 



."S OS 



fi 03 
03 <- 
O .S 
Sh 
03 
Q. 03 

^ > 

50 p. 

^rH 

,B 

-ij •- 
r to 



«8 • 2 

w S 
* «, o 

bo P B 

- bo .S3 

o3 



o, 03 
W ft 

s is 

03 tO 
J rH 

a> 

> 03 

«B J3 

?£> TJ 
OS B 



03 i 
U) 
03 

+J . 
B 
03 
U 

Sh 

03 . 
ft 

Sh ■ 

03 

<D 
>, 
I 

0) 

> 



o .T3 

*H TJ 

ft B 

lO 0) 

C3 -1-) 



o «o O 

^3 CS Sh 
03 rH <H 



03 



bo 



h cSC rt 



^3 .S3 
.t3^J 

rrj - 03 
03 *H 

!« * 

§ « S 

1 03 bO o3 

o3 03 ^2 



^J«M OS 
03 03 SI 

3 .5 

bo bo 
B «B « 

">>+3 * 
B fi 

S3 03 •- 

Ms 

u S3 

O fi TJ 

=3 » B 

33 03 

jfi SH ^ 
^3 «« 



108 
cr> rg 

O 03 

o m tj 

03 J3 Q. 

rH Sh 

SH 
o3 
03 
>> 



fi2 



as 

Sh 03 r . 
"+- 1 bO i 
TJ _g B 

fi e ° 
rt §tj 
1/5 2 fi 

Sfts. 
![■+->» 

o — ' 

«£> TJ 03 

OS fi > 

rH 03 fB 



03 



« fa? 

03 fi 



0) o 

OJ 
*% 

m 03 

03 r>J 

bo A 

iSi 

O 4- 



•3 °3 

>. 3 
0) .tn ft 

•+J S3 
03 SH _ 
Sh 03 fi 

g,.Sn © 
ft S3 Sh 
03 fi cTJ 

M j5 



bo 


03 3 


a 


H-» TJ 








bo +J 


Sh 


fi 2 


a 

Sh 


•Riy 


n> 


fi — 


-i-> 


03 TP 


B 


ft ?> 


H 


S SH 


Sh 

— i 


Q 4) 




<y ^2 




o3 O 



° 2 

Sh ^ 
03 
rQ 03 

3 03 
W 03 
o3 

TJ 
rrn" 03 

Ifi 

Sh OS 

$ -fi 

ft CJ 



s^ s 
2- . 

^H ^ 

O +j o 

'S3 Sh 

. fi 03 

o3 3 ^ 

03 O 

ii 03 Sh 
3 bO O 

£2Z 



6 "2 

bo J 

o "o 
« a 



is 



03 0) 

a os 



03 

rH CQ 

03 03 

B +-> 

rH O 






-U 


o 


OJ 




E 


C3 




+J 




0) 

bo 


03 

rC 
+H 


03 




8 


O 


Sh 
O 


03 
03 


B 


> 


3 


03 
CO 



o 

■!-> 

B 

TJ 
03 

bo 

Sh 
03 



03 a 

el) K 

03 - 
-u O 

« S 

rfi2 



a a 



Sh 2 
° § 

H-i ..H 

03 H-» 

•S3 

03 *rH 

H-» 

o w 

+j B 

• rHJ 

TJ 
03 U 

m o» 
o3 J3 

03 H-> 

u o 



1 



Dr. Carroll Cites Fundamental Similarities 

In Concerns of Tar Heel Educators, Then and Now 



A perusal of the agenda for the 
two-week meeting of Tar Heel edu- 
cators in 1884 which initiated the 
"North Carolina Teachers' Assem- 
bly" discloses that their problems 
and concerns were fundamentally 
similar to those facing today's edu- 
cators. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, made this observation in his 
address at the unveiling on Sept. 23 
of a marker at Waynesville com- 
memorating the founding of the 
organization which became the 
N. C. Education Association. 



Galloway Named Secretary 
Of Commission for Blind 

Grady R. Galloway, recently ap- 
pointed assistant State director of 
Vocational Rehabilitation at the 
Division's Raleigh Central Office 
after several years' service as dis- 
trict supervisor in Asheville, re- 
signed the State VR post to become 
executive secretary of the N. C. 
Commission for the Blind, effective 
Nov. 1. 

Galloway succeeds Henry A. 
Wood, who retired from the Com- 
mission post after 18 years. 

He joined the Asheville Office 
staff in 1946 as a rehabilitation 
counselor, following several years' 
service in the Navy. During his 
nearly 20 years as a counselor and 
supervisor, he received a number 
of recognitions, including the presi- 
dency of Region III, National Re- 
habilitation Association, and just 
recently, the Elkins Award, pre- 
sented by the National Rehabilita- 
tion Counseling Association. 

A native of Whittier, N. C, he 
is a graduate of Sylva High School 
and holds the B. S. and M. S. de- 
grees from Western Carolina 
Teachers' College. 

The Galloways and their three 
children now reside in Raleigh. He 
is a commander in the Naval Re- 
serve and is active in numerous 
professional and civic organiza- 
tions. 



Cites Common Concerns 

Among the "concerns, the prob- 
lems, and the issues which provided 
our predecessors with the incentive 
of action," he noted, were the neces- 
sity for increasing dues, promotion 
of teacher recruitment and scholar- 
ships for prospective teachers, the 
adequacy and "slant" of textbooks, 
the propriety of employing more 
female teachers (in our day, more 
male teachers), and the need for 
strengthening school-college rela- 
tionships, for publishing a good 
journal, and for reviewing and 
evaluating the organization's pur- 
poses. 

He then turned to the "funda- 
mental problems of our day which 
beg of answers," listing four major 
areas of concern ( see "Supt. Car- 
roll Says . . ." p. 2 of this issue.) 

Historical Background 

The historical marker on the 
Haywood County Courthouse lawn 
at Waynesville reads as follows : 
N. C. Education Association — Or- 
ganized in 1884 as N. C. Teachers' 
Assembly in the White Sulphur 
Springs Hotel. Building was one 
mile northwest. 

Actually, the State teachers' 
association was first formed at 
Warrenton on June 30, 1857 but 
was abandoned during the War 
years. The group which met at 
Waynesville to reorganize the as- 
sociation was known as the N. C. 
Teachers' Chatauqua. 

Other participants in the dedi- 
catory ceremony were Dr. Frank 
Greer, president of the N. C. 
Education Association, who pre- 
sided ; Dr. A. C. Dawson, executive 
secretary of the NCEA, who re- 
viewed highlights of the organiza- 
tion's history; Dr. Jerome Melton, 
superintendent of Haywood County 
Schools, who delivered the remarks 
of welcome; Robert 0. Conway, 
western area representative of the 
Department of Archives and His- 
tory, who presented the marker to 
the NCEA; and Samuel Smith, 
president of the Haywood County 
NCEA Chapter, who pronounced 
the benediction. 



McClure Rejoins Staff 
As Assistant Supervisor 

William Wilson McClure, agri- 
culture curriculum specialist in the 
Curriculum Laboratory, Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges since 
July 1963, recently was named an 
assistant State supervisor of Voca- 
tional Agriculture in the Division 
of Vocational Education, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 

He had previously served nearly 
three years as curriculum specialist 
in the Vocational Materials Labora- 
tory, State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

A graduate of Long Creek High 
School in Mecklenburg County, 
McClure holds the B. S. and M. S. 
degrees in Agricultural Education 
from N. C. State College, where 
he was an honor student in his 
senior year. 

Broad Experience 

He first joined the staff of the 
Department in 1948 as assistant 
supervisor, Veterans Farmer Train- 
ing Program, with responsibility 
for programs in 18 counties and 85 
schools. Prior to that he was a 
teacher of vocational agriculture at 
Edward Best High School in 
Franklin County for about nine 
years. After a year of graduate 
study, he served nearly six years 
as a vocational agriculture teacher 
at Glendale School in Johnston 
County. 

In the course of his extensive 
work in curriculum development, 
he has had several key roles and 
offices. He is North Carolina direc- 
tor, Southern Association for Agri- 
cultural Engineering and Voca- 
tional Agriculture and has been 
designated as liaison person to 
work with the U. S. Department 
of Agriculture Agencies in the 
area of teaching materials. He has 
also served as chairman of the 
Textbook Selection Committee in 
Vocational Agriculture, Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges. 

He is married to the former 
Hazel Boone of Louisburg; they 
reside in Garner with their two 
sons and daughter. He is superin- 
tendent of the Adult Department 
in the Sunday School of the First 
Baptist Church there. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



NCEA Legislative Body Plans Effort to Assure 
Local Program Control by School Administrators 



An effort to assure that fedarally 
financed educational programs are 
clearly under control of public 
school boards and administrators 
will be one of the principal aims 
of the 1967 legislative program 
now being formulated by the N. C. 
Education Association. 

Dr. A. C. Dawson, executive sec- 
retary of the NCEA, disclosed 
some of the main areas considered 
by the organization's Legislative 
Committee at a meeting in Raleigh 
on Sept. 18. 



School Board Delegates Hear 

Address by Governor Moore 

Governor Dan K. Moore was the 
keynote speaker at the 11th An- 
nual Delegate Assembly of the 
North Carolina State School Boards 
Association held Oct. 27 in Chapel 
Hill. 

An audience of more than 500 
school board members and school 
administrators from the State's 
169 administrative units heard the 
Governor's address. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, was moderator of a panel 
presentation on "Emerging Chal- 
lenges" which featured three speak- 
ers: 

• Ralph McCallister, director of 
operations for the Learning Insti- 
tute of North Carolina, explained 
the objectives of LINC and their 
implications for school boards. 

• Allan Markham, assistant di- 
rector of the Institute of Govern- 
ment at Chapel Hill, discussed new 
State and Federal education pro- 
grams. 

• A. C. Davis, Controller, State 
Board of Education, presented the 
background of the reorganization 
of school districts. 

Four afternoon discussion ses- 
sions concluded the one-day meet- 
ing. 



Voices Concerns 

He voiced some of the same con- 
cerns expressed at various meet- 
ings during the summer by Dr. 
Charles F. Carroll, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction. 

Calling for fuller use of school 
facilities and teaching services, the 
NCEA leader told the committee 
members : "The time is at hand for 
the education profession to assume 
the responsibility for the coordina- 
tion of all educational programs, 
including those which are result- 
ing from increased federal partici- 
pation. 

"Educators have sought, and still 
seek, adequate financing from all 
levels of government, local, State, 
and federal- — a partnership, so to 
speak. 

"This partnership is now a mat- 
ter of fact, like it or not, and it is 
incumbent on us to accept the chal- 
lenge. . . . Unless local school 
authorities grasp the steering 
mechanism, many of the new pro- 
grams are going to slip from their 
control and perhaps go flying out 
into space." 

Areas for Action 

He outlined four areas which he 
said should be considered in "our 
changing concept of educational 
improvement" and which should be 
financed in partnership by local 
State and federal funds : 

• Use of school facilities for any 
groups which can benefit from new 
and expanded programs, especially 
adult groups, on a year-round 
basis. 

• Employment of principals on a 
12-month basis where programs 
will justify it, so that all phases 
of the new programs will be under 
the direct supervision and adminis- 
tration of local school authorities. 

• An extension of the term of 
employment of all teachers, but es- 
pecially summer employment for 
sizable numbers of certified teach- 
ers, for the most efficient utiliza- 
tion of facilities and funds. 

• Substantially higher salaries 
for professional personnel. 



Educational Director 

Issued by Department 

Distribution of the Educational 
Directory of North Carolina, 1965- 

66 was started Nov. 22 and was 
expected to be substantially com- 
pleted by the end of the first week 
in December. 

This year's Directory, issued by 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction as Publication No. 391, 
is generally similar in format to 
last year's, with several improve- 
ments, such as a sewn rather than 
a stapled binding. 

Edited by James E. Jackman, 
the 1965-66 Directory was prepared 
by the Publications and Statistical 
Services staffs of the Department. 
W. W. Peek, director of Statistical 
Services, was in charge of gather- 
ing the information on school ad- 
ministrative units and the public 
school listings which constitute the 
major portion of the publication. 

The Directory also contains lists 
of all staff members of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
the State Board of Education Con- 
troller's Office, and the Department 
of Community Colleges ; names of 
the members of State boards and 
other agencies relating to educa- 
tion; officers of educational asso- 
ciations foundations, and other 
educational organizations ; lists of 
special schools, colleges and uni- 
versities and other post-secondary 
educational institutions; book, map, 
globe, and audiovisual dealers' rep- 
resentatives; and an alphabetical 
index with code numbers of every 
public school in North Carolina. 

Among the changes which will 
be noted are new code numbers 
for the schools, corresponding to 
the alphabetical listing of schools 
in each administrative unit. Vari- 
ous typographical changes also 
were made with the aim of improv- 
ing the appearance of the publica- 
tion and making it easier to read. 

Copies of the Directory are dis- 
tributed free of charge to superin- 
tendents, principals, and various 
educational agencies and associa- 
tions. Other individuals and organi- 
zations may obtain copies at $1.00 
each by writing Publications, State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



11 



a. 



UNC, Duke Ranked as Top Southern Universities 
In Appraisal by American Council on Education 



The University of North Caro- 
lina and Duke University are the 
pacemakers among the South's 
institutions of higher education, 
closely followed by the University 
of Texas, according to a recent 
appraisal by the American Coun- 
cil on Education (ACE). 

Ratings for the three universi- 
ties on the basis of average qual- 
ity of programs offered and inclu- 
siveness of offerings were A/A 
for the University of North Caro- 
lina, A/B for Duke, and B/B for 
the University of Texas. 

Features Studied 

Dr. Allan M. Cartter, former 
Duke economist and now a staff 
member of ACE, explained that 
the Council assessed qualities for 
universities throughout the na- 
tion. These, he said, included com- 
parisons of income devoted to 
education and training of students 
per student, faculty salaries, con- 
tract research grants, doctoral de- 
grees, selection of universities by 
graduate fellows, and other cri- 
teria. By these considerations, the 
three universities were invariably 
in the forefront, Cartter said. 

Noting that the South continues 
to lag behind other regions in 
higher education, Cartter said that 
it was his belief that North Caro- 
lina should continue to give ade- 
quate support to its foremost 
universities. 

Need for Priorities 

He warned that the South can- 
not advance unless it establishes 
priorities. "Other regions of the 
Nation, better endowed with out- 
standing universities, can afford 
the luxury of simultaneous growth 
of all of their colleges and univer- 
sities," he observed. "The South, 
however, will dissipate its re- 
sources and continue to be a fol- 
lower rather than a leader if it is 
not successful in establishing 
clear priorities." 

"Both the West and the Mid- 
West devote better than 13 per- 
cent of state tax revenues to high- 
er education, as contrasted with 



only 9 percent for the South," he 
said. 

'Vicious Circle' 

Unless the Southern states in- 
vest wisely, giving priority to 
their quality institutions, Cartter 
declared, the region "will remain 
within the vicious circle of turn- 
ing out mediocre scholars, teach- 
ers, and researchers who will tend 
to perpetuate mediocre institu- 
tions." 

Economic development of the 
region can best be stimulated "by 
giving at least as much attention 
to quality of education" as has 
been given to quantity, he com- 
mented. 

There is evidence that the lag 
in educational opportunities is be- 
ing overcome, he observed. Today 
the South "has the same percent- 
age of high school graduates en- 
tering college that the nation as 
a whole had in 1960." 



Chiemiego Named Supervisor 
of Special Services in VR 

Albert Albien Chiemiego, who 
has been in charge of the Wilming- 
ton Office of the Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation since 1946, 
was named State supervisor of 
Special Services for the Division 
effective Aug. 1. 

In his new post, he is in charge 
of supervising VR facilities at 
Kinston, Goldsboro, Butner, and 
Morganton and is assisting in pro- 
gram development in the field of 
mental health, said Robert A. Las- 
siter, State Director of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. 

A native of New Jersey, Chie- 
miego came to the Tar Heel State 
to attend N. C. State College at 
Raleigh, where he received his 
B. S. degree. He also has done 
additional graduate work at UNC, 
Chapel Hill. 



College Body Changes Name, Revises Constitution 



The North Carolina College Con- 
ference, organized in 1920, has a 
new name: the North Carolina 
Association of Colleges and Uni- 
versities. 

Delegates to the 45th Annual 
Meeting of the Conference at Char- 
lotte on Nov. 4 approved the name 
change along with a new constitu- 
tion including bylaws, which had 
been under study for some time. 

Dr. Arthur Wenger, president 
of Atlantic Christian College, was 
elected president of the Associa- 
tion, and Dr. Lewis T. Dowdy, 
president of Agricultural and Tech- 
nical College was named president- 
elect. 

Dr. J. P. Freeman, director of 
the Division of Professional Ser- 
vices, State Department of Public 
Instruction, was elected to a three- 
year term as secretary-treasurer, 
the same post he had held for sev- 
eral years in the N. C. College 
Conference. 

Members of the committee which 
drew up the revised Constitution 



and By-Laws were Dr. Howard 
Boozer, director, State Board of 
Higher Education, chairman; Dean 
W. L. Brinkley of Duke Univer- 
sity; Fred W. Cahill, Jr., of N. C. 
State University; Dr. Rudolph 
Jones, president of Fayetteville 
State College; Dr. Bruce E. Whita- 
ker, president of Chowan College; 
Dr. Freeman, and Dr. Wenger. 

Purposes of the Association, as 
set forth in the revised Constitu- 
tion and By-Laws are — 

• To provide a forum for the dis- 
cussion of trends and issues in 
higher education. 

• To provide a medium for co- 
ordination and articulation in mat- 
ters of common interest to mem- 
bers. 

• In other appropriate ways to 
further the cause of higher educa- 
tion in North Carolina. 

The work of the Association is 
discharged through five standing 
committees: Executive, Standards 
and Membership, Governmental 
Relations, Administrative Affairs, 
and College Student. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Board of Higher Education Promotes Dr. Boozer 
To Director's Post; Dr. John Corey Named Aide 



Dr. Howard Boozer and Dr. John 
F. Corey have been named director 
and assistant director, respectively, 
of the State Board of Higher Edu- 
cation, which was reorganized and 
expanded during the summer under 
legislation enacted by the 1965 
General Assembly. 

Appointed director on Oct. 8, Dr. 
Boozer announced a month later 
that Corey would assume the duties 
of assistant director on Dec. 1. 

Formerly associate director of 
the Board, Dr. Boozer had been 
serving as acting director since 
Sept. 1, when Dr. William C. 
Archie resigned the post to become 
dean of arts and sciences at the 
University of Delaware. Boozer 
joined the executive staff as asso- 
ciate director in 1961. 

The first step in the organiza- 
tional changeover occurred at the 
end of June, when Gov. Dan K. 
Moore announced the appointment 
of nine members of the Board. Sub- 
sequently, six other members, rep- 
resenting State-supported institu- 
tions of higher learning, were 
elected to the State Board by their 
respective boards of trustees. 

Hill Named Chairman 

Watts Hill, Jr. of Durham, 
named to a six-year term, was 
elected chairman in accord with 
the Governor's recommendation. 
Hill, president of the Home Secur- 
ity Life Insurance Co., is a gradu- 
ate of the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. He served 
two terms in the State House of 
Representatives, in the 1957 and 
1959 sessions, and was chairman 
of the House Committee on Higher 
Education in 1959. 

Also named to six-year terms on 
the Board were Addison H. Reese 
of Charlotte, president of the North 
Carolina National Bank, and J. P. 
Huskins, Statesville newspaper 
publisher and editor. 

Named to four-year terms were 
State Rep. Gordon Greenwood, 
Black Mountain newspaper pub- 
lisher, who was elected vice-chair- 
man of the new Board and who was 
a member of the previous Board; 
Dr. Hubert M. Poteat, Jr., Smith- 



field Surgeon; and John A. Prit- 
chett, Windsor attorney and vice- 
chairman of the State Board of 
Education. 

Mrs. Harry P. Horton of Pitts- 
boro, a member of the previous 
Board, was named to a two-year 
term, as were State Sen. Lindsay 
C. Warren, Goldsboro attorney, and 
Dr. Samuel Duncan, president of 
Livingstone College in Salisbury. 

The six "trustee members" and 
the institutions they represent are 
W. C. Harris, Jr. of Raleigh and 
Mrs. George B. Wilson of Fay- 
etteville, both for the University of 
North Carolina; John S. Stewart 
of Durham, Agricultural and Tech- 
nical College; James L. Whitfield 
of Raleigh, East Carolina College; 
Dr. Martin L. Brooks of Pembroke, 
Pembroke State College; and E. J. 
Whitmire of Franklin, Western 
North Carolina College. In the 
future, the four latter seats will 
rotate among other State-supported 
senior colleges. The "trustee mem- 
bers" are named for two years. 

Third Director 

Dr. Boozer is the third director 
of the Board of Higher Education 
since it was established in 1955. He 
previously served about seven years 
as a staff associate with the Amer- 
ican Council on Education at Wash- 
ington, including six months as 
acting director of the Council's 
Washington International Center. 
Before that, he taught English and 
social studies in a high school at 
Webester Groves, Mo. He served 
two tours as an officer in the Navy 
during World War II and the 
Korean Conflict. 

A Kentucky native, he attended 
Cumberland Junior College, Wil- 
liamsburg, Ky., received an A. B. 
degree from Howard College in 
Birmingham, and earned his B. S., 
M. S., and Ph. D. degrees from 
Washington University in St. 
Louis. 

Corey's Background 

Dr. Corey, an assistant professor 
of education at Appalachian State 
Teachers College, has served on the 
college's faculty for the past eight 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Clark Continues Career 
In Rehabilitation Field 

William Bryant Clark, supervis- 
or of public information in the 
Division of Vocational Rehabili- 
tation, State Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction, retired June 30 
after nearly 18 years' service with 
the Division. 

He joined the staff of the Divi- 
sion in 1947, serving several years 
as a rehabilitation counselor with 
the Salisbury District Office and 
later in the same capacity with 
the Raleigh District Office. In 
July 1960, he was appointed re- 
habilitation coordinator for spe- 
cial rehabilitation facilities, and 
in July 1964, he was named public 
information officer. 

Named Supervisors 

On Aug. 1, Mr. and Mrs. Clark 
were appointed supervisors of the 
Wake County Detention Home at 
Raleigh. "We are leaving one 
area of rehabilitation to enter an- 
other," Clark said. The Clarks had 
been serving as relief supervisors 
at the Detention Home for about 
a year. 

Clark wrote an article about this 
new venture which appeared in the 
July-August issue of Reach, bi- 
monthly publication of the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

years. He recently completed re- 
quirements for the doctoral degree 
in education at Duke University. A 
native of Greenville, he earned his 
B. A. and M. A. degrees at Appa- 
lachian. 

He saw overseas service in the 
Army Infantry during World War 
II and the Korean conflict and was 
awarded the Silver Star. He was 
discharged as a first lieutenant. 

In 1947, he became editor of the 
Wallace Enterprise, and he taught 
English in the Wilmington public 
schools for two years. He has 
served as consultant to the N. C. 
Film Board, the U. S. Office of 
Education, and the Southern Appa- 
lachian Historical Association. 

In 1960, Dr. Corey won the 
American College Public Relations 
Association's citation for his news- 
paper column, "School and Your 
Child." 



13 



J_ 



New Guide Lists Materials On North Carolina 



Students and teachers of North 
Carolina geography, history, and 
government will find an excellent 
source of information in North 
Carolina Materials and Resources, 
a 57-page bibliography for elemen- 
tary and secondary schools recently 
issued by the State Department of 
Public Instruction as Publication 
No. 389. 

"This publication is expected to 
be of particular value in selecting 
titles to support National Defense 
Education Act projects as well as 
programs and projects under the 
Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act of 1965," said Cora Paul 
Bomar, State Supervisor of Libra- 
ry and Instructional Materials Ser- 
vices, under whose direction the 
bibliography was prepared. 



Underlying Philosophy 

North Carolina Materials and 
Resources "reflects the philosophy 
that varied materials to strengthen 
the teaching of North Carolina 
history, geography and government 
should be available in the school 
library," Miss Bomar observed. It 
is "an enlargement on a previous 
publication, North Carolina: A 
Guide to the Selection of Materials, 
prepared under the chairmanship 
of Mrs. Mary Peacock Douglas for 
the 1964 Biennial School Library 
Conference cosponsored by the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction and the North Carolina 
Association of School Librarians. 



Valuable Features 

The opening chapter is a guide 
to the study of North Carolina, re- 
printed from The Social Studies 
Curriculum Guide (Publication No. 
380). Subsequent chapters include 
evaluation and selection aids, 
sources for North Carolina mater- 
ials, and bibliographies of books, 
periodicals, and audiovisual materi- 
als. Other valuable features are a 
list of North Carolina jobbers and 
publishers, an author index and a 
title index. 



One copy of North Carolina Ma- 
terials and Resources has been dis- 
tributed free of charge to every 
local superintendent and unit 
library supervisor and to every 
school. Additional copies are avail- 
able for 50 cents from Publications, 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

Health Careers Fund Drive 
Exceeds Goal by $16,000 

Tar Heel citizens gave a $416,000 
boost to the first Statewide effort 
to recruit young men and women 
in health careers, the N. C. Hospi- 
tal Association announced follow- 
ing the close of the "Health Careers 
for North Carolina" fund-raising 
campaign in mid-September. 

Marion J. Foster, executive di- 
rector of the Hospital Association, 
said the drive topped its goal by 
some $16,000. 

The campaign was launched in 
early June under the general chair- 
manship of Charles W. McCrary, 
president of Acme-McCrary Corp. 
of Asheboro. McCrary recently 
comple+ed a 10-year term on the 
State Board of Education and has 
served as chairman of the Ashe- 
boro City Board of Education for 
16 years. 

Health Careers for North Caro- 
lina, which operates from head- 
quarters at Raleigh, was founded 
three years ago by the N. C. Hos- 
pital Association with the aim of 
easing critical shortages of medical 
and paramedical personnel in the 
State's hospitals and medical cen- 
ters. 

A report issued in 1962 by The 
Duke Endowment revealed an ac- 
tual shortage of 4,817 people in 
health-related occupations in North 
Carolina. 

Of the total amount pledged dur- 
ing the recent campaign, Foster 
said, some $100,000 came from the 
various hospitals participating in 
the Health Careers program; the 
remainder is pledged in private 
contributions from throughout the 
State. 



Secretary's Retirement 
Caps 38 Years' Service 

Mrs. Josephine Adams, admin- 
istrative secretary in the Office of 
the Controller, State Board of Ed- 
ucation, retired June 24 after more 
than 38 years' service in State 
educational agencies, including 
more than 22 years as secretary 
in the Controller's Office. 

She began her career in State 
governmental work as stenograph- 
er for LeRoy Martin, principal 
clerk of the State Senate. When 
Martin was named chairman of 
the State Board of Equalization 
in April 1927, Mrs. Adams con- 
tinued serving as his stenograph- 
er. In 1933, the SBE was desig- 
nated as the State School Commis- 
sion and Martin became executive 
secretary. Lloyd E. Griffin suc- 
ceeded Martin in this post in 1935, 
and Nathan Yelton succeeded 
Griffin in 1941. Yelton was named 
Comptroller, State Board of Edu- 
cation in 1943, and Mrs. Adams 
became principal general clerk in 
the Comptroller's Office. 

Paul A. Reid succeeded Yelton 
as Comptroller in 1944, and Mrs. 
Adams' title then became secre- 
tary, Controller's Office. She con- 
tinued in this capacity under C. D. 
Douglas, who became Controller 
in 1949, and A. C. Davis, the pres- 
ent Controller, who succeeded 
Douglas in 1960. Mrs. Adams was 
named administrative secretary in 
March 1961. 

Finds Much To Do 

Interviewed three months after 
her retirement, Mrs. Adams de- 
clared that she had been enjoying 
the opportunity to devote more 
time to her favorite activities. "I 
thought I'd get a chance to sleep 
late after retiring," she said, "but 
there are so many interesting 
things to do that there is scarcely 
time for all of them." She partic- 
ularly enjoys reading, walking, 
and traveling and is active in 
church work (First Baptist Church 
in Raleigh). She is considering 
doing some volunteer work. 

(Continued on next page) 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



*7<4e Attabneif, Qenetal HuUl . . . 



Public Schools; Authority of Board of Educa- 
tion to Regulate the Appearance and Dress of 
Students; Regulations as to Haircuts 

You inquire as to the authority 
to regulate the dress and hair style 
of a public school cnild. You state 
that the inquiry is made because 
you have several male students 
who definitely need haircuts. You 
inquire if the principal has the 
authority to require his students 
to dress properly, and, if so, what 
would be our definition of proper 
dress. 

A public school is a place for 
educational and instructional pur- 
poses; it is not a bistro, a joint or 
a pad where beatniks gather, 
drink espresso coffee and substi- 
tute odd behavior and bizarre 
dress in lieu of brains. I am not 
aware that a public school is a 
place to display the latest rock 
and roll and Beatle techniques. 

We enclose copy of a letter is- 
sued by this office on June 29, 
1959, written to the Superinten- 
dent of Durham County Schools 
in regard to wearing bermuda 
shorts and blue jeans. This letter 
was written by Mr. Claude Love 
who was a school teacher some- 
time before he became Assistant 
Attorney General. You will note 
that he said that if pupils should 
persist in coming to school dress- 
ed in such extreme fashions as to 
become a menace to the school 
the Board of Education would 
have the authority to adopt rea- 
sonable rules and regulations to 
prohibit such practice and the 
principal would have the power to 



(Continued from page 14) 

During the summer, she enjoyed 
two visits with her son and his 
family, who reside in State Col- 
lege, Pa. Her son, Edward A. 
Adams, is a professor in the field 
of products design at Pennsylvan- 
ia State. Mrs. Adams has three 
grandchildren, and she relished 
the opportunity for a more leisure- 
ly visit with them than she has 
been able to have during her years 
as a "working grandmother." 



dismiss a pupil for violation of 
such regulations, subject to a re- 
view as granted by the statute. 
Mr. Love thought that there 
would be some doubts as to pro- 
hibiting bermuda shorts by boys 
and blue jeans by girls in all cir- 
cumstances. We think he had in 
mind that such attire could be 
prohibited in normal classroom 
and educational operations of the 
school but perhaps would be prop- 
er in extracurricular activities, 
and with this we agree. By the 
same token we think that the 
Board of Education can pass a 
regulation that male students 
must have a proper haircut which 
conforms with the normal and 
accepted practices and fashion in 
such matters. They can pass a 
regulation excluding wearing long 
hair like the Beatles, duck-tail 
haircuts and Indian-head haircuts. 
There is no hard and fast rule as 
to proper dress but to our minds 
it means a reasonable dress or at- 
tire that accords with the usual 
standards accepted and practiced 
by people of decency and good 
taste. 

If your Board will pass such a 
regulation, then we think you will 
have the right to exclude these 
pupils from school if they will 
not conform to a sensible personal 
appearance. Attorney General, Sep- 
tember 13, 1965. 

Prof. Hattie Fowler Dies 

Miss Hattie Rebecca Fowler, as- 
sociate professor of education at 
Lenoir Rhyne College, Hickory, for 
the past 29 years, died Oct. 3 at 
Iredell Memorial Hospital follow- 
ing an illness of four months. 

A native of Iredell County, she 
was a graduate of Mitchell College 
and held the master's degree from 
Columbia University. She taught 
at Pembroke College before going 
to Lenoir Rhyne. 

She was a member of numerous 
professional organizations and had 
served on several educational ad- 
visory bodies, including the Ele- 
mentary Education Committee for 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 



School Lunch Week . . . 

(Continued from page 5) 

In his statement, the Governor 
noted that during the 1964-65 
school year, "the North Carolina 
School Food Service Program 
served 122,000,000 nutritionally 
adequate lunches through the un- 
tiring assistance of 11,000 em- 
ployees." 

Schools throughout the Tar Heel 
State joined in the observance, in 
response to State Superintendent 
Charles F. Carroll's suggestion that 
"appropriate publicity be given to 
the School Food Service Program 
in each administrative unit in 
recognition of the nutritional and 
educational values it contributes to 
the youth of our State." 

Special bulletin board displays, 
table decorations, banners and 
posters calling attention to the 
value of nutritionally adequate 
lunches blossomed in thousands of 
schools. Numerous types of special 
activities were carried out, includ- 
ing open houses in many school 
lunchrooms; planning of special 
menus; lunches for faculty mem- 
bers ; and coffee hours for teachers, 
parents, and other interested adults 
of the community. 

Suggestions for appropriate ac- 
tivities and a review of the import- 
ance and development of the Na- 
tional School Lunch Program were 
included in a colorful special issue 
of Tar Heel School Food Service, 
publication of the School Food Ser- 
vice section, State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

O. L. Searing, State supervisor 
of School Food Service, observed 
that the special School Lunch Week 
issue was just one of several new 
publications prepared this year by 
the State School Food Service staff. 



For me, purpose and meaning are 
given to university service because 
I believe that the public school 
system, including the colleges and 
universities, provides coheseive- 
ness in American life. Schools are 
the neutral ground where par- 
tisans on all other issues — relig- 
ious economic, political, social, 
may join in a common effort for 
furthering the public welfare. — 
David Dodds Henry 



NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



15 



LOOKING BACK 

In November issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1960 

Quality education in North 
Carolina's public schools is the un- 
derlying theme of recommendations 
set forth in a printed publication 
recently issued by the Curriculum 
Study, State Board of Education. 
Dr. I. E. Ready is director of the 
Study. 

Colerain High School in Bertie 
County is initiating this year a 
schedule consisting of three 100- 
minute periods per day. It is the 
second high school in the State to 
try such a plan — Rosewood High 
in Wayne has been operating on 
such a schedule since 1958-59. 

Ten Years Ago, 1955 

Dr. John W. Magill recently 
joined the State Department of 
Public Instruction as educational 
supervisor for the mentally handi- 
capped, a new position created by 
the 1955 General Assembly. 

Fire extinguishers and first aid 
kits will be part of the standard 
equipment of all new school buses 
purchased under a ruling recently 
adopted by the State Board of Edu- 
cation. 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1950 

The people of North Carolina 
have voted a total of $92,347,000 
for school buildings in local elec- 
tions within the past two years, 
according to a survey report by 
John L. Cameron, director, Divi- 
sion of Schoolhouse Planning and 
Surveys. 

Homer A. Lassiter, adviser in 
General Education, has been named 
to succeed J. E. Miller as associate 
in the Division of Instructional 
Services. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1945 

As a basis for starting a State 
program for education of the phys- 
ically handicapped, teachers have 
been asked by State Supt. Clyde 
Erwin to aid in taking a census 
of the physically handicapped in 
North Carolina. 



New Hanover School System Chosen as Partner 
Of American Schools at Athens in New Program 



Selection of the New Hanover 
County Schools as one of 25 school 
systems in the nation to partici- 
pate in the new three-year School- 
to-School Program sponsored by 
the U. S. Department of State was 
greeted with hearty congratula- 
tions by State education leaders. 

Ernest Manning, director of the 
State Department's Overseas 
School Program, explained that 
the 25 school systems will be 
paired with American schools 
sponsored by the State Depart- 
ment in foreign countries. New 
Hanover has been paired with the 
American Community Schools in 
Athens. 

Nature of Program 

The School-to-School Program 
will involve exchange of curricu- 
lum materials, cultural exhibits, 
teachers, and students with the 
schools in Athens, said Dr. Wil- 
liam H. Wagoner, superintendent 
of New Hanover County Schools. 
"It will mean the broadening of 
the horizons for all our education- 
al endeavors," he declared. "The 
educational potential of sharing 
through letters, tape recordings, 
pictures, and teacher exchange 
the heritage coming to us from 
Greece is limitless." 

Dale K. Spencer, associate su- 
perintendent of New Hanover 
County schools, described the set- 
up of the school system at Athens. 
Of the 1,190 students enrolled in 
the American Community Schools, 



Twenty-Five Years Ago, 1940 

Twelve new vocational agricul- 
ture departments have been estab- 
lished in North Carolina high 
schools this fall, bring the total 
number of these departments in 
the State to 415. 

A series of 30-minute afternoon 
radio programs on the State Gov- 
ernment is being broadcast each 
Monday by the State Department 
of Public Instruction over Raleigh 
station WPTF. 



he said, 106 are children of Unit- 
ed States embassy and agency staff 
members; 627 of members of mili- 
tary forces; 315 are from U. S. 
non-governmental families; 27 
from the host country; and 115 
are children of third nationals. 
The 54-member faculty includes 
37 from the United States ; 7 Brit- 
ish; seven Greek; one Dutch; one 
French, and one German. 



Hailed as Opportunity 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, hailed the announcement of 
New Hanover's selection as "a 
tribute to North Carolina." 

"I feel very definitely that this 
is one of the very finest means of 
developing and nurturing inter- 
national good will through under- 
standing our respective national 
goals and purposes," he stated. 

Dr. Dallas Herring of Rose Hill, 
Chairman of the State Board of 
Education, said he thought the 
selection was "quite an honor" for 
the New Hanover school system. 
"We have learned a great deal 
about education from ancient 
Greece, and it may be that modern 
Greece has something to teach us 
as well," Herring commented. 

The Wilmington Star-News car- 
ried a feature article by Marti Mar- 
tion on the School-to-School Pro- 
gram in its Aug. 29 issue, with 
photographs of the strikingly mod- 
ern school district administrative 
office and the campus, showing the 
academy and middle school build- 
ings. 



Public sentiment is everything. 
With public sentiment nothing can 
fail; without it, nothing can suc- 
ceed. Consequently, he who molds 
public opinion goes deeper than he 
who enacts statutes or pronounces 
decisions. He makes statutes or 
decisions possible or impossible to 
execut. — W. Harold Kingsley 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



E 5* 



T:3o/f 




DUCATIOINAL 

RESS 

ISSOCI ATION 

OF 

MERICA 



Norfh Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



DECEMBER 1965 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, No. 4 



£« 




Revised ESEA Guidelines Permit More Students to Benefit 









Revised guidelines for the prep- 
aration of projects under Title I of 
the Elementary and Secondary Ed- 
ucation Act will extend its benefits 
to a larger number of economically 
disadvantaged Tar Heel children 
and youth, State school officials 
agreed after studying the amended 
formulations issued by the U. S. 
Office of Education the first week 
in December. 

Sections of the guidelines re- 
lating to the proportion of dis- 
advantaged children required to 
qualify a school for submission of 
Title I projects were overhauled 
after North Carolina's State Board 
of Education and Superintendent 
of Public Instruction and several 
other chief state school officers 
registered protests. 

More Flexible 

The State Board and Dr. Charles 
F. Carroll had criticized the orig- 
inal guidelines and the basic reg- 
ulation as "obviously discrimi- 
natory" in restricting eligibility 
for participation to school attend- 
ance areas with concentrations of 
economically disadvantaged chil- 
dren at least as high as for the 
district as a whole. 

While the revised guidelines do 
not abolish the basic restriction, 
they allow greater flexibility in 
determining which schools can 
qualify, said Carlton Fleetwood, 
chairman of North Carolina's 
ESEA Steering Committee. 

The amended "suggestions" 
allow the ranking of schools with 
concentrations of children from 
low-income families "at least as 
high as for the district as a whole" 
on a percentage or a numerical 
basis, or by use of a "combination 
of these two methods, if necessary, 
to avoid inequities in the admini- 
stration of programs." 



Secondary Schools 

The new formulation also per- 
mits a secondary school "whose 
attendance area comprises several 
elementary areas with high con- 
centrations of children from low- 
income families'' to be considered 
eligible for a Title I project, 
regardless of whether the pro- 
portion of the secondary school's 
students designated as economic- 
ally disadvantaged is less than the 
concentration of such students for 
the district as a whole. 

This change in the guidelines, 
Fleetwood explained, means that 
children who have been attending 
a school which qualified for a Title 
I project will not automatically be 



denied benefits under Title I if 
the junior high or high school in 
which they continue their educa- 
tion happens not to have a pro- 
portion of disadvantaged children 
less than that for the district as 
a whole. 

Background for Change 

Dr. Carroll traced the develop- 
ment of the movement which led 
to relaxation of the formula at a 
meeting of school superintendents 
in Durham just after the revised 
guidelines were received: 

After the State Board lodged its 
protest with the U. S. Office of 
Education, a concerted move for 

(Continued on Page k) 



Federal Regulations, Testing Programs Debated 
At Chief State School Officers' Annual Meeting 



Growing concern over the prolif- 
feration of Federal regulations 
and the anticipated development of 
national testing and assessment 
programs in the area of public 
education was much in evidence 
at the annual meeting of the 
Council of Chief State School 
Officers in Honolulu the third week 
in November. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, reviewing the meeting, said 
that many of the State education 
agency heads indicated that they 
were disturbed by the manner in 
which recent regulations had been 
drawn up, particularly the lack of 
consultation with State officials 
and the delays in interpretations 
of the regulations. 

'Junior Partner' 

Commissioner of Education 
Francis Keppel reiterated to the 
group his contention that the 
Federal government's role in the 



development of educational pro- 
grams must be that of a "junior 
partner." 

"The Federal interest does not 
and must never mean Federal 
control of education," Commis- 
sioner Keppel declared. "It is 
sound public policy to keep the 
majority of education's stock at 
the local level, a large portion at 
the state level, and a minority at 
the Federal level." 

Main Questions 

Questions and criticisms ad- 
dressed to the Commissioner and 
members of his staff by the State 
educational leaders centered on 
the regulations relating to the 
Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act, which North Carolina's 
education officials had assailed as 
patently discriminatory, and on 
the implications of national test- 
ing programs seen as a possible 

(Continued on Page 5) 



(Excerpts from address to North Carolina Democratic Women's Convention, Durham, 
October 1, 1965) 

Fortunate are the people of any state who can assert in good faith that adequate 
educational opportunities and advantages are available to all of them ... I know 
it is a matter of profound pride for North Carolinians to be oble to say that we have 
educational service available for practically all of our children and for most of our 
adults. The only exceptions to our all-inclusive programs and services are those folk 
who are relatively isolated and separated from centers or sites of educational 
activity. . . . 

Over the years North Carolina has set as a goal the establishment and maintenance 
of these "educational decencies" for all of its children: 

• A well-educated, inspirational teacher competent to bring out of a child the 
best that is in him; 

• A well-lighted, well-heated, sanitary, attractive school building well-equipped 
with good books and other instructional materials; 

• Safe, hygienic transportation if the child lives too far from school to walk. 

In addition, North Carolina has committed itself to a program of differential edu- 
cation available to the gifted, the average, the handicapped, the privileged, the cul- 
turally disadvantaged, and the economically distressed. 

Further, we are committed to the proposition that there shall be no discrimination 

against any child because of his residence, race, color, religion, or national origin. 

In recent times also we have committed ourselves more firmly and positively to a 
program of adult education. Herein lies perhaps the most challenging opportunity 
available to us. Education begets education and as we graduate more and more men 
and women from our schools and colleges there will come greater demand for adult 

education. Furthermore, there will come further demand for more education from drop- 
outs and from ail othr people who want to upgrade themselves to the point that they 
might keep apace of the present day and its demands. . . . 

In this, the 1965-66 school year, we expect an enrollment of approximately 
1,210,000 children in the public schools of North Carolina. These children and youth 
will be served by a professional staff of approximately 48,000. 

These youth will be housed in buildings representing values well in exeess of $1 
billion. 

Many of these children and youth will be transported to and from school in more 
than 9,000 buses, operating at the lowest per capita cost among the 50 states of 
the union. 

Most of the children in the public schools along with their teachers will patronize 
school cafeterias whose annual volume of business approximates $50 million. 

Within the 1965-67 biennium it is probable that the public schools of North 
Carolina will spend from State, local and Federal sources about $850 million. This is 
a large sum of money. At the same time, however, I am compelled to point out that 
North Carolina will be spending for public school education only 70 percent as much 
on each pupil as the average state. Comparisons are usually odious, but \ cannot 
refrain from pointing out the grave responsibility and duty that rests with those who 
attempt to buy $1 worth of educational service for 70 cents. . . . 

With funds immediately available from federal sources we can embark upon some 
. . . new and strengthened programs of education. With additional funds to be made 
available, I am sure, by tax-levying bodies within our own State, we can embark 
upon still other programs. The greatest support, however, necessary for a strengthened 
program of education will be represented by the moral and spiritual backing of people 
such as are assembled here today. 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

Public education is the bedrock 
responsibility of State government. 
We must always insist that it get 
the degree of attention which is in 
keeping with that responsibility. — 
Gov. Dan K. Moore, in address to 
State School Boards Association, 
November 1965. 



What complicates matters (in 
learning theory) ... is that people 
reared in different cultures learn 
to learn differently. . . . Education 
and educational systems are about 
as laden with emotion and as char- 
acteristic of a given culture as its 
language. It should not come as a 
surprise that we encounter real 
opposition to our educational sys- 
tem when we make attempts to 
transfer it overseas. — Edward T. 
Hall, The Silent Language, Double- 
day-Premier 



When a man becomes content with 
what he already knows, he ceases 
to be a good teacher. He cannot 
communicate the excitement of 
learning, because for him the 
excitement has ceased to exist. 
Research is the lifeblood of intell- 
ectual pursuits. — Leonard H. Axe 



The primary concern of Ameri- 
can education today is ... to culti- 
vate in the largest number of our 
future citizens and appreciation 
both of the responsibilities and the 
benefits which come to them be- 
cause they are American and free. 
— James B. Conant 



Patience is not an isolated thing. 
It is an intelligent desire with a 
willingness to work and an under- 
standing of how much effort and 
time will be required. — Charles 
Kettering 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 
V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

Vol. XXX, No. 4 



December 1965 



One wonders whether the astute 
critics who proclaim the superior- 
ity of European schools over Amer- 
ican schools have taken the trouble 
to observe closely a number of 
average schools in Europe's hinter- 
lands, as well as to visit "model" 
schools in the larger cities. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



< 7i4fte jpJi that Jl&nf, afford JlooJz 



In the current headlong rush to 
plan new and extended educational 
programs and the running debate 
on the methods of evaluating these 
efforts, it is to be hoped that due 
consideration is being given, all 
along the line, to the question of 
how to appraise their quality, as 
well as their extent and scope. 

Qualitative evaluation is obvi- 
ously much more complex and diffi- 
cult than appraisal in terms of 
amounts — numbers of students be- 
ing served, teacher-pupil ratios, and 
even pupil achievement test scores. 

As difficult as it may be, there is 
no time when a long, hard look is 
more needed than now, when un- 
precedented developments are being 
pushed. Though the need for im- 
mediate and massive response to 
the demands of our rapidly chang- 
ing society and economy is evident, 
if the response is to be truly effec- 
tive and not convulsive, it must be 
tied to astute, keen, and coopera- 
tive critical reflection. 

Analyze Assumptions 

Such analysis should be applied 
not only to the evaluation of on- 
going and prospective programs 
and services in terms of the fre- 
quently reiterated goals and pur- 
poses, but to the fundamental 
assumptions, stated and unstated, 
embodied in these goals and pur- 
poses. 

It is too easy to assume that the 
implications of certain standard 
educational sentiments, for exam- 
ple, "meeting the needs of the 
individual and the socioeconomic 
order" are well understood. If such 
phrases are to be more than pious 
slogans, the questions of what 
these "needs" are, how they are to 
be determined, and whether they 
have been well determined, require 
positive answers. 

Unfortunately, the answers to 
such basic questions are too often 
themselves framed mainly in terms 
of some pet theory, more or less 
supported by available evidence, 
and they are more diverse than we 
may be willing to admit. The con- 
sequence may well be perpetuation 
of the status quo, with a few inno- 
vations tacked on to satisfy the 
qualms of partly repressed doubts. 



Still, the questions do remain, 
even though their entanglement 
with the quirks of their proponents 
and their accidental association 
with dubious attitudes may lead 
to their being set aside as "crack- 
pot" or "cranky." 

There are the nagging queries 
about the possible deleterious ef- 
fects of the grading system . . . the 
effectiveness of the graded struc- 
ture . . . the inflexibility of organ- 
izational patterns which effectually 
prevent students from changing 
course after being forced too early 
to make choices which they perhaps 
are not equipped to make . . . 
whether instructional approaches 
in the social studies are contribut- 
ing more to a leveling of values 
than to the development of freely 
inquiring minds . . . whether pro- 
grammed learning is more effective 
in certain areas than traditional 
instructional approaches . . . what 
times of day are best for program- 
ing various types of activity . . . 
whether certain types of instruc- 
tional materials and methods rein- 
force undesirable social attitudes. 
. . . The list could be extended 
indefinitely. 

Stimulate Debate 

If these important questions are 
not to be shrugged off or settled 
dogmatically, there must be an 
earnest attempt to stimulate de- 
bate; if this debate is not to de- 
generate into mere collision of 
ideas, there must be a sincere will- 
ingness and cooperative effort to 
separate fertile suggestions from 
the chaff of personal prejudices 
and dead jargon. There is not 
enough time to waste in petty dis- 
pute. 

It may well be that the main re- 
sult of confronting these questions, 
over and over, is to develop the 
awareness that their answers are 
elusive and conditional. Heightened 
perceptivity is itself probably a 
desirable result of the process. 
Qualitative appraisal requires high 
quality appraisers. 

A long, hard look with a view to 
quality is not a luxury; as educa- 
tion becomes increasingly diversi- 
fied and specialized, there is great- 
er need than ever for overall un- 
derstanding and coherent criticism. 



1U Mad Vital link 



That education has become by 
far our nation's largest "industry" 
is a sign of the vitality of demo- 
cracy. The very vastness of the 
enterprise is staggering to the 
imagination; yet, as ever, the most 
vital link, the point of actualization 
of the entire process, is the 
relationship between student and 
teacher. 

It is at this point that the rela- 
tive success or failure of the educa- 
tional effort is determined. The 
teacher, in the classroom, is the 
image of education, not only in 
the minds of children and youth, 
but also in the memories of adults. 
All the well-planned facilities, the 
instructional paraphernalia, even 
the most basic tools, are there to 
back up this most vital link. 

Though there are those who hold 
that education, more and more, will 
become a matter of direct relation 
of students to instructional ma- 
chines, monitored by highly trained 
technologists, the idea that the 
student-teacher contact will not re- 
main essential is as difficult to 
conceive as the idea that family 
relationships will be supplanted by 
more tenuous arrangements. 

Teaching, as any good teacher 
knows, is far more than imparting 
facts or stimulating enthusiasm 
for learning. In very large meas- 
ure, it is the guiding, the goading, 
the drawing of young and un- 
formed persons into humanity. It 
is helping them find out how to 
interact with others, transmitting 
by means not fully understood the 
heritage of mankind and develop- 
ing a sense of personal importance. 

Such dry questions as whether 
teaching is an art or a science do 
not touch on the heart of the mat- 
ter — teaching is a way of life, a 
response to the unspoken and spok- 
en need to become someone valu- 
able in one's own eyes and in the 
sight of those one respects. It is, 
primarily, acceptance of another, 
not blind to faults but hopeful for 
improvement, and the nurture of 
the child's response to a full- 
fledged development of his own 
ability to accept others so. It is 
continuous with parenthood. 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Governor, Education Leaders Stress Concerns 
In Several Areas at Superintendents' Meeting 



Federal-state relations, school 
accreditation as a prerequisite for 
receiving State school funds, and 
teachers' unions were the principal 
areas of concern stressed by Tar 
Heel governmental and educa- 
tional leaders in their addresses 
at the NCEA Superintendents 
Conference held Dec. 7-8 at 
Durham. 

Governor Dan K. Moore, speak- 
ing at the closing evening session, 
said he was disturbed over devel- 
oping trends in "the administra- 
tion of new federal programs of 
aid to education." 

Warns of By-Passing 

"I appreciate the assistance of 
the federal government in educa- 
tion," the Governor stated, "but 
only so long as it does not inter- 
fere with the rights of our people 
to govern themselves. . . 

"I think it is unwise that the 
federal government has sought to 
by-pass the State educational 
agency and to deal directly with 
local districts." 

The "all-important link" be- 
tween the State and local govern- 
ments must be maintained, the 
Governor declared. 

(At a news conference in 
Raleigh the following day, Gov. 
Moore reiterated his concern 
about growing Federal involve- 
ment, noting that there is a danger 
that the federal government might 
get into the area of prescribing 
curriculum and textbooks. He also 
observed that there are problems 
in formulating regulations which 
will apply to all states. He said 
North Carolina's school system is 
"unique" in that it is "more nearly 
a State system" than many others. 
Some of the Federal programs 
apparently were designed with 
school systems in mind which are 
not like North Carolina's, he 
said.) 

State Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll told the superintendents 
he was convinced that the Federal 
government would continue to 
"call the shots" in administering 
aid program. He cited the revision 
of guidelines for submission of 
projects under Title I of the 



Elementary and Secondary Educa- 
tion Act as a result of protests by 
State educational agencies and the 
Council of Chief State School 
officers. 

Standards as Condition 

Dr. Carroll placed his main 
emphasis on the need for State- 
enforced standards of quality for 
all schools, noting that he had 
long urged that State accredita- 
tion be made a condition of eligi- 
bility to receive State school 
funds. 

Referring to the many inquiries 
he has received from representa- 
tives of industries considering 
locating in North Carolina, he 
said that quality schools are key 
aids in attracting these industries. 

At present, he observed, any 
public school may receive State 
funds by meeting certain mini- 
mum standards, such as the 
number of days classes are held 
and the pupil-teacher ratio, but 
these do not touch on levels of 
quality. 

Cites Teacher Unrest 

At the opening session, Dr. A. 
C. Dawson, executive secretary of 
the N. C. Education Association 
warned that there are evidences 
of increasing unrest among teach- 
ers which may lead some of them 
to affiliate with teachers' unions. 

He pointed to the recent estab- 
lishment of the N. C. Organization 
of Teachers as an indication of this 
trend, noting that the NCOT has 
avowed as its chief goals the rais- 
ing of teacher salaries, having 
some influence on the selection of 
textbooks, and helping dissatisfied 
teachers find other jobs. 

Stressing that teachers have 
every right to organize. Dr. 
Dawson stated that it is a prev- 
alent feeling among educators 
that one professional organization 
is sufficient. At the national level, 
he said, some union leaders "are 
making an all-out effort to union- 
ize teachers." It is not clear just 
how strong these efforts are, he 
said, but the teaching profession 
is "embroiled in the restlessness 
of our times." 



Revised Guidelines . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 

revision of the guidelines grew 
out of the meeting of the Council 
of Chief State School Officers at 
Honolulu, which was attended by 
Commissioner of Education Francis 
Keppel and several members of his 
staff, Dr. Carroll raised the issue 
of the formula, stating that of the 
estimated $326,000 North Carolina 
would be eligible to receive under 
the act, as much as $100,000 might 
not be used because of the rigid 
restrictions laid down in the 
original guidelines. 

Mutually Helpful 

On Nov. 23, a conference was 
held at Washington with repre- 
sentatives of several state educa- 
tional agencies participating, in an 
effort to work out proposed 
changes. Dr. Woodrow Sugg, chair- 
man of the Title I Subcommittee of 
the State Steering Committee, was 
North Carolina's representative. 

Dr. Carroll remarked that this 
and other meetings with U. S. 
Office of Education officials had 
proved "mutually helpful." 

"We recognize that they have 
quite a task to formulate rules 
that apply to the diverse needs of 
a nation," he said. "At the same 
time, they are not omniscient, and 
they welcome suggestions." 

Consultant Teams 

Teams of State Department of 
Public Instruction staff members 
discussed with local superintend- 
ents the project proposals they 
had prepared to submit under 
Title I in individual conferences 
held Dec. 14-16 at four strategic 
locations ■ — Asheville, Salisbury, 
Raleigh, and Greenville. 

On Dec. 17. Fleetwood went to 
Washington, taking a number of 
the project proposals as samples 
to get the reactions of U. S. Office 
of Education staff members on the 
types of programs being planned. 
He was accompanied on the trip 
by three general supervisors from 
the New Hanover County school 
system, Jerry Beaver. Heyward 
Bellamy, and John Bridgman. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Chief School Officers . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 

outgrowth of certain provisions of 
the ESEA itself and the inter- 
pretations formulated by the 
Federal agency. 

Dr. Carroll said it was the feel- 
ing of the State officials at the 
meeting that the Act was designed 
largely for urban communities 
with heavy concentrations of eco- 
nomically disadvantaged children. 
"This raises the question of how 
best to translate the regulations 
to fit the problems of rural areas," 
he said. 

'Too Stringent' 

Commissioner Keppel admitted 
that certain sections of the regu- 
lations were "too stringent," and 
asked the school officers for advice 
on how to "slenderize" the quanti- 
ties of multiple forms required in 
submitting project proposals and 
follow-up reports on the projects. 
Keppel said the preparation of 
voluminous reports was inevitable 
because the President and Con- 
gress expect rather detailed ac- 
counting of the financial and edu- 
cational aspects of the projects 
carried out with ESEA funds. 

Such extensive evaluation of 
educational programs inevitably 
raises the specter of national test- 
ing programs and a consequent 
drift into a common curriculum 
with Federally-prescribed stand- 
ards, Dr. Carroll said. 

"The consensus was that we do 
not want national testing," he 
added. Many of the State officials 
present were leery of uniform 
nationwide curricular patterns re- 
gardless of how they were devel- 
oped, he noted. 

Sampling Approach 

Keppel stated at the meeting 
that he is vigorously opposed to 
any general national testing pro- 
gram and remarked that the idea 
of educational program evaluation 
had evidently generated mis- 
impressions. One approach that 
is contemplated is to employ stati- 
stical sampling methods such as 
those used in opinion polls and 
market research, he said. 



Board Approves First- Education Expense Grant-; 
Federal Court- Suit Challenges Law's Validity 



The State Board of Education, 
acting at its December 2 meeting, 
after receipt of a ruling from the 
Attorney General's office, approved 
payment of North Carolina's first 
tuition grant for attendance at a 
private school, contingent upon 
the availability of funds from 
the Department of Administration. 
Action effecting release of the 
funds has not been taken. 

The Board authorized the $256 
tuition grant to be paid, through 
the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board 
of Education, to Lewis Wilson Mc- 
Clain of Mecklenburg County for 
his ward, Terrence H. McClain. 
The youth is attending Carolina 
Military Academy in Maxton. It 
is the first such grant awarded 
under Article 32 of chapter 115 
of the General Statutes (the 1956 
Paersall Plan). 

Federal Suit Filed 

A week following the approval 
three Negro families filed a Fed- 
eral suit challenging the law, seek- 
ing a temporary order restraining 
payment of the grant and a per- 
manent injunction banning all 
such payments. The plaintiffs are 
children of Dr. D. A. Hawkins, the 
Rev. Darius L. Swann, and the 
Rev. E. J. Moore. All are from 
Charlotte. 

The ruling (see "The Attorney 
General Rules" on page 15) points 
out that the Legislature did not 
state that the private school to 
be attended had to be segregated. 

Basis for Approval 

The statute provides as a basis 
for approval of an educational 
expense grant: (1) residence with- 
in the administrative unit; (2) 
nonavailability of a public school 
attended by a child of another 
race and where reasonable re- 
assignment to a public school not 
attended by the other race is im- 
possible; and (3) enrollment, or 
acceptance for enrollment, by a 
private, nonsectarian school rec- 
ognized and approved by the State 
Board of Education. 



McClain objected to his ward's 
attending a Mecklenburg County 
high school which was integrated 
this year. Carolina Military Aca- 
demy has no Negro students dur- 
ing the current year. However, 
Col. L. L. Blankenship, president 
of the military school, informed 
the Board of Education that the 
school "is committed to the policy 
of integration" and its directors 
"have unanimously endorsed the 
Civil Rights Act without any 
strings attached." 



Other Objections 

The Federal suit also asks for 
injunctions prohibiting the imple- 
mentation of two State school laws 
which have never been put into 
effect. 

One is the local option plan 
which would allow local school 
boards to avoid desegregation al- 
though school staffs would con- 
tinue to be paid. The other would 
allow a pupil to be exempt from 
the compulsory attendance laws if 
his parents withdrew him from 
school to avoid desegregation pro- 
vided he could not be reassigned 
to a segregated school. 

The complaint charges that all 
three laws "f r u s t r a t e" and 
"defeat" the plan for desegregation 
of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg 
schools. The tuition grants, it is 
alleged, "illegally divert State 
funds from public education;" the 
local option plan defeats the 1954 
Supreme Court ruling; and the 
compulsory attendance exemption 
encourages "the maintenance of 
separate education" for Negroes 
and whites. 

The only other request for a 
tuition grant ever to come before 
the State Board of Education was 
refused at the November Board 
meeting because the private school 
in question was located outside 
the State and, therefore, had not 
been approved by the North 
Carolina Board of Education. 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



rlunt Cites Teacher Shortage as Main Problem 
In Providing Full Special Education Programs 



A shortage of qualified teachers 
rather than a lack of funds is the 
main reason many school units in 
North Carolina are unable to of- 
fer a full special education pro- 
gram, according to Nile F. Hunt, 
Director of the Division of In- 
structional Services, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 

Speaking before the 17th an- 
nual Special Education Confer- 
ence held in Asheville, Hunt said 
that "in most instances where 
there is no special education pro- 
gram, or where a program is not 
as extensive as it ought to be, it 
is because a superintendent is 
looking for personnel." 

At the time of the conference, 
November 18-20, Hunt said 14 
speech therapist positions in 
North Carolina were vacant, all 
of them positions for which the 
State Board of Education had al- 
ready allocated funds. He said 
there also is a need for more 
qualified teachers to conduct clas- 
ses for the educable mentally re- 
tarded. Currently, nine of the 
State's 169 school units do not of- 
fer any program for the educable 
mentally retarded and eight of 
these units list the inability to 
find teachers as the reason. 

Cites Progress 

Hunt also cited the progress 
made in North Carolina since 
1949-50, the year the State's spe- 
cial education program got under 
way. The number of special ed- 
ucation teachers has grown from 
54 in that year to 1,304 and the 
number of children served by the 
program has grown from 2,000 to 
more than 37,000. "In terms of 
growth our record seems to be 
rather impressive," he said. "Yet, 
in terms of meeting the overall 
need among the youth of North 
Carolina, we have much to do." 

Dr. Herbert Goldstein, a noted 
author of curriculum materials and 
articles on educational problems 
of the mentally retarded, reviewed 
various programs designed to 
foster critical and independent 



thinking among such children. For 
too long, he said, emphasis has 
been placed on what the mentally 
retarded cannot do — not what they 
can do. Curriculum material de- 
veloped in this field must foster 
in the child the ability to think 
independently and the ability to 
think critically. 

Independent thinking can be in- 
duced in the classroom by the way 
the teacher operates, he declared. 
The teacher should not tell the 
child everything — he will learn by 
rote. Although the mentally re- 
tarded child may not be able to 
verbalize a rule, he can learn to 
automatically act on it. 

Think Critically 

"But to think independently is 
not enough unless one can think 
critically," Dr. Goldstein con- 
tinued. To do this one must have 
facts- — but not just any facts. They 
must be facts which will lend 
themselves to critical thinking as 
adults. 

Dr. Goldstein is Chairman of 
the Department of Special Educa- 
tion, Graduate School of Educa- 
tion, at Yeshiva University in New 
York City. 

Dr. Harold Westlake, head of 
the Department of Communicative 
Disorders at Northwestern Uni- 
versity, Evanston, 111., spoke to 
the conference on "The Role of 
the Speech Therapist in the Treat- 
ment of Children with Neurologi- 
cal Speech Problems.'' Sometimes, 
he said, these children understand 
words but not word sequences. 
Consequently, they do not talk 
well because speech is learned 
through auditory reception. 

Allen R. Cohen, a former con- 
sulting psychologist with the Spe- 
cial Education section of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
spoke on "Preparation of Handi- 
capped Youth for Work." He is 
now assistant regional represen- 
tative with the Charlottesville, 
Va. Regional Office, Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, Depart- 
ment of Health, Education and 
Welfare. 



He said handicapped youth can 
be guaranteed a continuous and 
coordinated program by pooling 
resources of a variety of services. 
When they reach adulthood, handi- 
capped children will bear only the 
fruit planted by their teachers, he 
said. "So be careful, be sure, and 
above all BE." 

In the conference banquet ad- 
dress entitled "The Bite of the 
Barracuda — Special Education for 
the Sixties," Dr. C. Douglas Car- 
ter of Winston-Salem indicated 
that those concerned with special 
education may have been too com- 
placent. He believes that the times 
demand that, instead of waiting 
for things to happen, those invol- 
ved in special education must go 
out and secure the things that are 
essential to develop programs de- 
signed to fulfill the needs of the 
handicapped youth living in to- 
day's technical world. 

A majority of North Carolina's 
over 1,200 special education 
teachers were in attendance. The 
conference also attracted a num- 
ber of school superintendents, 
supervisors, and principals; col- 
lege staff members, physicians; 
social workers; and interested 
parents. 

Conference Sponsors 

The conference is sponsored an- 
nually by the Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction. Cooperating this 
year were the Asheville City and 
the Buncombe County Public 
Schools as well as the North Caro- 
lina Council for Exceptional Chil- 
dren, the North Carolina Speech 
and Hearing Association, the Bun- 
come County Association for Re- 
tarded Children, and the Ashe- 
ville Chamber of Commerce. Dr. 
Felix S. Barker, Director of Spe- 
cial Education, State Department 
of Public Instruction, served as 
chairman and Joseph R. Ramsey, 
Director of Special Education for 
the Asheville City — Buncombe 
County Schools, served as co- 
chairman in charge of local ar- 
rangements. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Guilford Journalist- Named Publications Editor 



Mrs. Almetta Cooke (Cookie) 
Brooks of the Greensboro Daily 
News High Point bureau, joined 
the Publications staff of the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
as editor on Dec. 1. 

Her appointment to the edi- 
torial post was announced on Nov. 
9 by Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion. In her new position, Dr. Car- 
roll said, Mrs. Brooks will be re- 
sponsible for editing the North 
Carolina Public School Bulletin 
and a number of other publica- 
tions issued by the Department. 

He noted that Mrs. Brooks' posi- 
tion is a new one resulting from a 
reorganization of the Publica- 
tions section. James E. Jackman, 
editorial consultant since Febru- 
ary 1964, will continue in his 
present position. 

In her 14 years with the High 
Point bureau of the Greensboro 
newspaper, Mrs. Brooks was re- 
sponsible for news coverage over 
a wide area. Prior to that, she was 
director of the Western North 
Carolina Travel News Bureau and 
a reporter for the High Point En- 
terprise and the Indianapolis 
Times. 

Mrs. Brooks is immediate past 
president of Pilot International, 

Dr. Gordon McAndrew Named 
Assistant Director of LINC 

Dr. Gordon McAndrew, director 
of the N. C. Advancement School 
at Winston-Salem, has been ap- 
pointed to a new position as as- 
sistant director of the Learning 
Institute of North Carolina, in 
addition to his present post. 

In announcing the appointment 
early in December, Harold Howe, 
II, director of the Learning Insti- 
tute, stated that Dr. McAndrew 
will continue to reside at Winston- 
Salem while devoting a portion of 
his time to his new assignment. 

The Learning Institute (LINC) 
has its headquarters at the Quail 
Roost Conference Center in Rouge- 
mont. The Advancement School is 
operated by the Learning Institute 
under a contract with the State 
Board of Education. 



an organization of service clubs 
for business and professional 
women with 14,000 members and 
more than 470 clubs in five coun- 
tries. 

She is a member of the Presi- 
dent's Committee on the Employ- 
ment of the Handicapped, the Na- 
tional Council of Women in the 
U. S., the N. C. Press Women's As- 
sociation, and the American 
Legion Auxiliary. 

Prior to entering the news field, 
she taught art and literature in 
Davidson County, Tenn. and at 
High Point College. 

A native of Maiden, N. C, she 
is a graduate of George Peabody 
College for Teachers in Nashville, 
Tenn. She did graduate work at 
Peabody College and the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. 



AEC Site Appraisal Team 
Hears Report on Schools 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, was among the group of 
North Carolina government, busi- 
ness, and educational leaders who 
met on Nov. 31 with representa- 
tives of the Atomic Energy Com- 
mission who were investigating 
possible sites for a $300 million 
atomic energy plant. 

He reported finding the inspec- 
tion team visiting this State 
especially interested in educational 
facilities and advantages. Dr. Car- 
roll reported in full on the public 
school system. The AEC team was 
one of eight checking on some 85 
proposed sites in 43 states. 



Raleigh School Dedication Honors Dr. Carrol 



Dedication of the Charles F. 
Carroll Junior High School, the 
first to be named for the current 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, was held on December 5. It 
is located on Six Forks Road in 
Raleigh. 

Dr. and Mrs. Carroll were hon- 
ored guests at the dedication and 
at an open house which followed. 
Former Raleigh Mayor James 
Reid, in delivering the main ad- 
dress, said : "It is good that we 
dedicate this building in the name 
of a man who has given most of 
his life up to the present in the 
service of education in the State 
of North Carolina." 

Reid traced Dr. Carroll's career 
from the time he entered the field 
of education in Vance County in 
1921 to his assuming of the State 
superintendency in 1952. Of his 
present post, Reid said: "We all 
recognize it has been his service 
to the cause of education in North 
Carolina that has made the name 
of Charles F. Carroll synonymous 
with the progress that has been 
made in our schools since 1952. Dr. 
Carroll refuses to take individual 
credit for these advancements. The 
momentum of progress in North 



Carolina's schools, he says, goes 
back through the decades. 

"But, he is pleased that the num- 
ber of high school graduates in this 
state has increased 100 percent in 
the last 20 years, to more than 
60,000 last year. And, school en- 
rollment has increased 50 percent 
in this same period, to more than 
1,200,000 students. It is growing 
at the rate of 15,000 to 18,000 new 
students every year. The number 
of teachers has increased 80 per- 
cent. We now have a professional 
staff of over 48,000 in education in 
North Carolina; and, there is one 
professional person for each 22 
pupils in average daily attendance. 
Ninety-seven percent of our faculty 
now has four years of college or 
more. The average salary of our 
teachers has risen more than five 
and one-half times in the past 25 
years. This record speaks for it- 
self." 

A highlight of the program was 
the presentation by Dr. Charles F. 
Carroll, Jr., on behalf of the Car- 
roll family, of an oil portrait of 
the school's namesake. It was un- 
veiled by two of Dr. Carroll's 
grandchildren, Michael and Daniel 
Carroll. 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 




SO 

o> 



fig 
UJ 
CO 

uj 
u 






co 

OS 



OS 

o 

o 

K 

u 

os 

o 

t— I 

pa 

M 

O 

< 

a 

H 

O 
fc 

!** 
H 

P 

OS 

J 
w 
!*; 

o 

CO 

W 

0- 



WrtHN^OHt 



©t-co©u3c-CMooco 



HHOOHOiOM'l'MOO 
OM01NOoo«»COW 



C 35 

4. c 



i-Hi-Hi-tr-H©©©©© 

I I 



M^f HHHlOMOM 
OlWCCfl' I HHrHOQ 



OOHM 

I 



O«00OHOi0DCi|> 
lOM'fOTl'OQOHOOi 
CMC-©'c+>©©©OOF-© 
t-t-OOCOOOOOOOQOQOCO 



CDt-C©©©>-iC*JCO^t-m 

0)0>QC50QOC5ff)0) 



lO--tfCOr-(r-C-CO-*I<<X> 



COlCOOOOO^fOooOOcO 

CCMt-'S'iflMNotOc- 



<t-i>io«o 



OiOOW«TfiXiTj«c 



CMe->-H - ^'©CMeM©'-<eO 
tOOJOt-NOOOlHO 

wccwwcooor-imco 

CM CI WMNNMC3COCO 



G O C. OJ ^ Ol OV ~. G ffl 






co cm cq cm id ci V cm - 



i— i^iC^^CTiCMiCCOCM 

OHOw H H'^"fl , cca) 



i ft CM O O 



001W«tOC3NHCO 
COO^H-tf O00t-H 
OCOOOOMtCiT. CON 



CMCMrHCOCOeM.-'CO^CM 

^ COCOt-i-iCMOOOCOCOm 

^ coMHOOnoffirtiO 



o o © o - 



«C f OOQOHfMCOTl'irt 
lO lO m lO (D tD C e IfitC 
C> Q Q C: Q 01 C C. Ci C^ 



be 



0) g « 



C 

o 

2 ^ 

>- «» 

Q 

^ c 

■;'= 

^ o 

J I 

t/1 o 

2 2 

SL § 

O ? 

II 

U -< 
C I. 

— o 

*- u- 

S 7 

£ S 

ll 

C 3 
UJ CQ 



IO Sh 

o 

O 

0) CO 

CO CO 

o3 *# 
03 



3 

Is 

o <=> 

a 



03 (— , C8 



QJ 

73 



a; 






g s 



OS c 

03 .1-1 

03 3 
03 

>» nfl 

3 4J 

° 8 
cj & 



03 .- a> 

-U> 03 g, 

& > .5 

j3 a) -H 

CO S 03 

„ . « C 



o _ 
£! «" 

3 c 

^s 

]Lh TO 
3 

CO g 

,-H t,H 
"c3 73 

&J 03 
hH 03 

in c 
co ^j 

tH 03 
03 h 

a 



be 

^ TO 



S.S 



s -^ o 

"y O 

« 2 h 

C B 

"S 03 .S 

pJh CO 

03 C 

C +» 

co -^ o 

C o 

S U) 03 

> o c 

B.-U C 



S.rH TO 



03 a> 



03 ? 
U O 

o 

CO 



'/-' 



.="0 

+J o 

-3 S 



M 2 

CJ 
-i-J 03 

a «h 



T3 ?h 

03 03 

"5 S 

03 3 

03 rQ 

. u 

« g 



bO !- 

S 3 

03 . 

OS 
03 03 



h 

03 

h 

03 



+ - > c 

-2 2 

03 s 

!- CO 

° 03 



L? 03 

^^ 

b > 

O O 

ft >H 



09 



C 

c 
o 

X 



O 



P 
03 

S 

o 

o 

C 

M 

W 

P 
M 
H 



03 rH 03 

?j C30 ,C 



01 














g 














1 a 


eo 


CO 


«# 


^« 


io 


© C 




o 


en 






t- c 




ia 


CO 


CC 


cc 


CO c 


Numbe 
actuall 
comple 
during 


CM 
























0} 














B 














1 h 














kC >> 


eo 


c 


,—1 


00 


in 




« 9 u . 


us 




CO 


in 






Numb 
abanc 
durin 
schoo 


00 


lO 


-T 


-<* 


CO 


T* , 


u 














■gMg 














•o c E. 














tiona 
5 nee 
ginni 
liool 


r- 


0> 


cc 


(M 


© 


CO i| 


CO 




© 




N 


CM : 


00 


c 


c ~ 


-r 


t- 


© E 


•o Ex n 








































<! £« o 












1 


4) 










































a ° 




























se ove 
r avai 
inning 

us yea 


























CM 


f -C- 


rH 


ce 


h- 


n- 




r- 


t- 


a. 




CD | 


H 


ffi 


tj- 


00 


© 


© 


« J Ho 














0- J- o ■- 




























c 3 — s 














— c e =. 














m 














E ». 














r roo 
le at 
ng o 
year 


-^r 


c 




c- 


CO 


© 


'- 


-r 








TJ- 


mbe 

inn 
ool 


CM 


CM 




Irt 




CD 


*^f 


CO 


t- 


rf 


en 


© 


cc 












^ ' fll u 

^i a x tn 




























U5 


t^ 


CKl 




© 






i-; 


i- 


it: 


US 


CO 


CO 1 


^ 


o 


m 


cn 


en 


en 


en 

















fi 03 

rt O 

03 03 

h 03 

•^2 « 



00 

03 

03 ,C 

03 -u 

S O 

03 *« 

CO 03 



03 



•rt -fl rt 



CO 03 

3 TD 



c 

03 

!-i Q3 

^ o3 

- W 

C 03 

03 13 

CO 

U 03 

03 ft 

h 03 



c 

03 M 

03 M 

03 , 

C rf< 

CO 

co i-i 

- 03 



3 £ 

a) cd 
ftO 

US 4J 

oo o 

03 
to 



rj ^ M 03 hh 






tr- 
ee 

.a o 

X o 

«H 

O 






5 2 



' 03 

ft 5 

03 
3 h? 

o 
03 

ft 

GQ 



co o3 


C 


s 


DO 03 




C 


® 3 

03 


O 


O 


jriO 


s- 


+-> IO 


OJ 




3 CO 


^- s 


13 


o3 C3 


R 


OJ 


3 l-H 


-; 


3 


S- 03 


C 


T3 

cu 
-3 
o 
r/i 


3 ,3 

ft-^ 


03 
-3 



o g 

ce -2 



03 

U 03 

03 j3 

2 c3 

3 o3 
O 03 



03 ft 

03 73 
Ji 03 
bo-g 

03 03 

£ 3 

i 03 
r3 

■+■* 3 

-u O 

CC ^S 



§ d. H 
-g ft a>& 

co •" 



3 *- c t 

0) o el 

H< 

3 73 h 

O 03 C 

03 C 

03 C \ 

•£, 03 

-3 r 



^?3 
^3 O 



s«.^ 



bo^ 

.S <~- 

"C CM . 

3 co ; 

73 'Cf 1 4 
3^ 

"cl 1 . 

03 * ■' 



^ 03 ( 

ft >» : 



O °3 

3 

« .2 

f 3 CO 

Jh 03 

03 O 

J3 *h 

+3 ft 



£ 03 



3 3 



03 s_ W 

ft^: 

.5 3 
& 



^ »8t! 3 
-3 co © co 



O .co 

!3 ~o3 

c 3 

03 .S 

«H g 

° £3 

03 Q 



03 O 



V. 73 CO 
03 3 ,33 

ft O -3 
03 CJ to 
43 OJ 3 

CO Hi 

rQ +J 03 

03 U £ 

3 <H 
'•+3 !h j3 

ej o3 ■+- 
o JJ'g 



3 


. <4H 
03 O 




g h 


73 
cu 


T3 03 

JO 


73 


03 £ 


c 

CJ 


e 1 

03 3 



bo, 

.a o ,j 

3 03 



i-( 73 
O] 03 

.' CJ 
CO 03 

S- 73 



-3 03 
" CQ 

■x 



13 *5 

03 O 

>> 3 
o 5 

ft 

S 2 

CD rC 



g o 

co o3 
Ih 03 
03 J3 

ft o3 



3 
3 
O 
03 co 



C 03 

•42 jo 

S s 

q 3 
w 3 
73 

03 03 
'O j3 

03 +3 
03 

3 «h 

k. O 



QJ 



03 " - " 

C3^ 

■ rt +> tf 

3 

bo <h o 

3 O 'g 

TJ co 

3S +J 03 

3 3^ 

CO 03 P 



3 
3 

93 

J3 



3 co 

03 03 

Sh cj 

)H X 

3 03 



O Ih 

O 03 

Sh Sh 

O 03 

"+3 3 



h 2 ^ 

P 2t3 
03 3 
3-| 

o co e 

>p s g 

ft 03 03 
£ ^ J3 

oj= I 
«H bo,^ 

Xj t *H 

03 2 03 
-— J~ CO 
3 +» n! 



a co 

,H 3 03 

bo|S 

c 2 2 

.— . T3 TO 
£ 03 «H 

| eg 

COSH © 

73 CJ 
- Q3 CO 

fcl o) _ 

a 3 3 

03 " »ph 

c s 

03 "g 

■£ bo S 



o 2j 

3^ 
3 co 

•IH Ol 

O "• 

j3 03 
+» J3 

e .5 

o 

3 T3 



* 2 

ft 

CO M 

CO > 

§co 

►sS 

CJ 33 
CO 03 

MH 

CJ ** 



■e C3 
3 o 4* 



73 
3 "O 

5 03 

4J CO 

3 c3 

•cm 

03 

a 3 

co .2 



C3 



>.C7J ' 

iH w 

73 CO 03 

.2 '03 £ 
. — i +J 

ft d « 

fi+i « 
3 CQ +J 

3 



>> 0) 

j3 



3 

cci O 



03 

j3 



o > JS o3 3 3 
M 03 73 33 3 3 



° c 

c3 c 



■s 3 ° 

+J J3 73 

CO w 3 

3 03 
03 i 

J3 03 

-•-> j3 

>>j3^ 
-°t3 o 

« Pi ~» 

r^ 03 

rr -»-j 

co "H jz 

.« O 73 



03 

5r! c° 

03 -4-3 

ft 3 

O 03 

73 

— 3 



03 g 
J- 3-C 

M 5 — 



CT3 



CU 
ft 

^ o 

CO -3 



-Sco-S 

g 3 

03 >h 

& co* "co 

co C.2 
"- 1 I? 

O Ph 

03 « «H 

h. .CJ O 
>> W "3" 

03 -a a 

_ o3 

§2 & 



i 2 * 

c O jj 

o g rt 

Sp 

cd >> 

P. bo 3 

<U -jh 



s's 



C O 



oa 

cj 
o 

'fe- 
rn 
CD 



«H 2 
O ^ 

s 
p 3 



CO ct3 



to 03 

3 Sh 
p3 O 



.2 5h 

<*£ 

CO rrt 

U 3 
jo <U 

3 rC 

O -^ 

o o 

73 

rH <" 

3 -P> 

CO Sh 

cu C 
Sh o 



3 o 
a> r3 
hp u 

CO 

co cu 
a> 73 
J! 

2 «H 

co o 
cu ,_ 



73 

CD 

0) O 



CO S* 
CD 

a p3 

■IH O 



CO 5-i 

rH CD 
CD 

73 



0) CD 
I- 

CD p3 

73 CD 

£'£ 

bO £ 



co 5h 
CO cO 
,3 CD 

73 I 
CD O 
Sh rH 
CO 

& CD 
CD p3 
5-1 -P> 
ft 

>a CD 
33 > 
CO O 



CD 

r3 



a ~ 



be c 

e « 

£ > 
a 5-. 

s e 

i-i # g 

o 
53 bo 

3 C 

« '3 
s 



i rd .rH 

5 bo o 



73 Sh -3 
CD 03 Ph 
3 & 



Sfi to 



k C fi 

i?«S o 

a « 

& « s 
3 CD O 
CO bo - j3. 

5 m N 

X o 73 

CD rC 



3 ^ S 

g*£ 

I ^ cO 
5h Sh g 
O O M 
«H ft , 

CD co 
CO 5-i JO 



« ' m 'o g CD 5 

CD X •!-= 

?*!'§ 

P co co 

3 -^ 
a 3 _ 

CD O 
CD 73 O 

O C ^ 
g CD O 

a 4J co 



CD 

5. ft ' 

CD 

CD O 

Eh g 



.tn cO 
W g 



3 rr-J 

2 s 

g. cO 

CD „ 
5-i CD 
«H bO 

jo « 

co iL 

g p3 



T3 >> 

CD 5-1 

+s cO 

5i ■+-> 

S s 

ft CD 

CD C 



i CO CD O 

Ph.2 ^ 



w 



CD 



5-1 =H 

CD O 

* CO 

- CO 

CO 5h 

3 CO 



C 
CD 
-P 
C 

<D 

ft_C 

m 

CD S 
fl 3 
-P CD 

cE 

«H •« 

O 73 



«H CD 

O 3 

3 

CD CD 

5h 

CD CD 

^5 ' 



£2 cd + J 



Sb* 



CD 



5-1 
3 
O 



3 «4H 

.HO 



.. cO 



coco 

+= tH 
3 

c3 . 

> c 

-« 1 

CD C 
-+J 

5h 

O -+J 

a co 

CD 5h 

Sh ^3 



SB, • o 

bo co 

CO CD U 

JJ bo CD 

fj cO X> 

O +> 3 

3 5h 3 

co O 3 

. r3 3 



cO O 

5 5- 

*^ CD 

CD ^2 

O g 

S 3 

Sh ^h 

O CO 



co 



" .3 3 

, Ira r-< Sh 
2 O -C 3 

CM h ' ri 3 



.S5 
•3 ? 

3 

3 "3 
O CD 



,3 

a o 



5"H p. 



S CO^ Sh 



5h cO co 

CO «H CD 

CD CO 

>i bo co 

3 CD 

.S 5h 

» S? 3 

cO C3 K 



-3^ 



5h CD 

cO o 

CD 5h 

>> CD 

ft 



^ O 53 

s a °§ 

S CD CO 

CD ^ CD 

p, CO bO 

OJ fD — . 
U3 



O 5h 

CD 

73 ^ 

g *H 

CD o 

CO -P cD 

S R CD 

f-S "P CD 

3. W 5h 

S CD 

2" CD ft 
3 _c 

CO +3 cd 



ft O 



T3 bo 
co rr 

w .5 



-A -r 



CO JH 
CO 

5h ^ 
3 >, 

co Tl 

co co 



O cs 
■— i lO 
O 
bo i-( 
3 



33 a n T-i 



LO CO 
OS ft 



CO 



ft g 
CD 



CO ft 

3 g< 

O 3 

• rH CO 

CO 

CO <-! 



C 



Sh 
Sh S! so cS 

o 1 " o«h a) 
co t- ft bOCD 3 O >» 



3 3 
O CD 

o s 

3 



CD 

■53 .a 

O CO 
CD 

5h CO 

~ ho 

^H 3 

CD CD 

3 £ 

5h CD 

° 3? 

CO ft 



■S CO 

■p -p ■ 

3 3 m 

CD CD 'S 

o o 3 

CD CD tfH 
ft ft^ 

rH( 05 CO 

°° ^ O 

U5 ITS ^h 

CO „ ^ 

3 

3 

c 



CD jj 
!>i CD 



•■H <H 

-(J 

33 >? 

73 CD 

3 Sh 



.3 CD 

-p 3 



R 3 



C 03 

O ^3 



i 

5- 
03 
P..S "*" 



3 
3 « 

2 S 

CO w 

CJ ^ 
«H >> 

2-° 

&73 
ri CD 



3 3 
S if 

1-2 

CO 

cS rt 

*H - 

O r3 



03 CO 

,d cO 

EH pt 

CO 73 
t— I 03 
CM 73 



co 



3 
3 CD 



2, -2 g 



co .3 
h33 
ft 3 O 
3 — < 

ft 



OS'S 



■JO ^ 05 



CO CD 



CD XJ 

3 p 
3 

O tH 



OJ 73 
03 CD 

2 >> 

CD .2 
Sh ft 



- 73 

T— I rj-j 

3 

M 03 

3 Sh 

03 03 

>5 ^ 



3 CO 
3 C3 
ft^H 



3 to 
Sh 

03 03 

CO X 

3 CD 

9 3 

Sh q) 



-P> O 
3 
03 

3 03 

p3 ,3 

g s 

CD 3 



H-H 03 I 

° ^ g 

5h ^h 

3 ^ CD 

r3 

_ co -to 
rt S ^ 
O ^ P 

"^73 

CD 

03 >> 

^3 O 



CO 
Sh 
03 

a 2 

B3 
03 
03 -P 



Sh I CO 

03 ^ so- 
■P05 J 
Sh +? g 

° 2 — 
<pj o 

03 cO C 

cO 3 

03 ^«H 
03 03 



3 CO 



CO CO «H 

Sh O 
. 03 

(N r3 o 

■«* cj -3 

rf< 3 -H 

^ 03 3 

l-H HP Sh 



3 

o ! 

S3 & <fH 

r2 CD O 

JO 

03 C 3 

bO 3 CD 
3 CD CJ 



"»~1 (-1 .^1 



CD > 

,3 p ■ 
o 

3 Sh 

03 3 • 

HP 03 



ft; w co 



Sh <; 



3 
p3 co 



cm ^ 

TH cj 
-P> ^C 

2 3 
O -3 

3 C 
O 

CD -3 

^ 3 

^?1 

cO "3 
PO CD 

2 * 
ft^S 



p< CD 

5-B 



CD 
P3 



e 
© 

o 2 '-3 

3 

CD 



po 

3 

3 O 
3 

o 



Sh 

3 

03 >> 
ft « 

I 3 

O 5h 

■IH O 

ft< 



3 Sh 
3 ft 

O" g 



X, 

CD 

3 

CD 
H 



•rH HP 

3 cO 

3 tH 
03 

p3 

3 b 

CD P3 



3 
.S 

■JO 

3 
O 

o 



<C S- rt 



» -fl „', » 



p3 "* 

boCTi 

£ P 



03 O 
CO** 

t 8 

CD 3 

CD .!h 

Sh CO 
03 



P co fe: 

Sh o P* 

'3 ^ • 

Sh 3 

3 73 

3 



O -pS 



3 
3 

° S 

co <1 

CO - 

03 - 
<+P 

O CO 

Sh CO 
ft 3 



O CD 



CO 

ft 



& 3 
p3 g 

p3 V. 



ho .3 33 



3 -3 

03 73 

3 .*h 



3 co 03 
P3 



co 

t CD 

bo p 

.5 g 



p3 " j 

1h 

LO 3 

C3-> CD 



H- V„ m 

cO bo CD 

<b « ^ 

hp CD CO 

Sh Sh 

03 O Sh 
CD 



CO 

a 

CD 

P 

CD 
p3 



G 3 

IH ft 



h 2 5 

w 3 p 

„p O 

m 03 O 03 

3 3 hp '^ 

3 co T3 

" IB O 

? 3 g ^ 

Sh 3 ^ CD 

3 CD CD 



r. I 



■r 

I 



- 
- •. • 

% 

- ; 

:.:• 

: ■.: 

- 3' 

k J 
aftii 



CO 03 

03 J3 

co h3 
3 

03 •. CO 

£ CO 03 

CJ 73 N 

I-" 03 #r- i 

•S CD Jg 

C 3 

"3 r3 

1 B g 

I 2 8 

O 3 -p 

K = 5. 

c- CD o 



3 



«H > Sh 

o o 

^ 3 03 

CJ 33 5h 

3 3 

Sh 13 

03 CO 

> CT2 

O T-l 



03 
P* 

3 
g 

T3 co 
03 CD 

s h 
• ? 

73 bo 

3 * 
O 

M CD 

o 

a 3 

HP 

.jj CD 

S -=! 
3S +> 

CD 
H 03 



73 3 
03 "I 



C 3 
03 K 



03 g - 



22 

o" c 



ft .a 

Sh CD 2 

■H CJ CB 

M CD CD 

3 CD CD 

S 3 ^ 



w 

3- Hi 

IS 33 co 

TO CD cO 

CO CD 

O 3 S 

3 P3 CD 



Sh 


3 


3 




H-J 


3 


CD 

PO 
3 

Sh 
CO 


Sh 
03 
CD 

CD 
73 


40 

CO 

CD 
p3 
-p- 


It 


3 




73 


g 


£ 


73 


03 




Sh 
«*P 


3 


> 


3 


3 






P3 


CD 


CO 




+H 


-PJ 




3 


<H 




3 


J3 




cr 



2^ 

ts.s 

tc 3 - 3 co 



hp CD 73 



m3 J, 

s.s 

, O Sh 
O ft 

O.S 3 

„ 6.2 

3 Sh HP 
O 03 3 
•rH HP CJ 
P 03 3 
g73T3 
O * 



3 



3 CD 

3 cj 

bo 3 

Sh ft 

O CO 



03 3 
HP HP 

o 

co 

>> g 

Sh 03 
O P 

**> s. 

03 ^ 

4S CO 

3 
O 

o 

2 t3 
_e c- 1 
77 co 



co 73 

03 03 

B 03 

.5 3 

HP 

2 a> 

g p3 

o ■*» 



.5 cj 
o 



- &> B 

HP £ 73 03 

S P3 5h r-^ 

.~ -1-1 CS £> 

O O O 5 

ftjO p3 4p 



G CD 3 

.5 > 3 

3 rt 8 

.« x: cd 

*3 p3 

CJ *" 

03 

73 73 73 
3 CD 

>» O 

33 O 



-S.S 2 

HP " w 

CO CO 03 

■ rH •« ^ 

3 o - 
3 '■§ V 

Sh CO HP 
5" 1 3 Sh 

3 a 

a a!2 
a 

3 

Sh 



3 3 Sh 
3 O 03 

P< HP -h > 

= I s 

CJ 03 a 03 
O Sh O 03 

o 3 a.3 



3 

3 co 

03 4P 

Sh (3 3 

2p3 bO 

rt fe c 

JP •* '3 

o 

3 



3 



s.s 

Sh 
03 hp 

HP CJ 
HP 03 

a*£ 

S 03 

.2 2 



3 



CD 3 

CO 03 

CO 3 Sh 

h O O 



3 

M O 

3 t3 

O 3 

a 
73 

3 3 
■~ p3 

w S ^ 

2 c p3 

3 3"^ 

HP K CO 
Sh CJ 3 

3 p3 

a p 



°£ 

Sh 2 
03 P2 
p3 I 

3 73 

3 CD 
3 73 

03 
03 03 

£ « 

CO 



CD 
> 
3 
p3 

p3 

CD 

p3 



1 03 03 

~ 5h p3 

O CD hp 

Sh ,3 

3 fe 3 

03 ££ 

03 hp 
r-J CO -3 

« p3 ^ 

£^73 

> CD 

-S is 

^3 

CD 73 CO 

3 w co 

*S „?■* 

03 W 

2 3 3 
a' S ' 2 

3 ^^ 



.2 -a 

•l-l SJ 

bo s 
3 CD 
•rt CD 

s2 M 

03 3 
3 ,3 

Sh CO 

O 73 
■+1 CD 



73 



■p 3 

s .a 

03 

3 03 
p5 33 

Oh 

CD 

CO 

3 5h 

»2 

3 77 



5-2 



a -3 



11 J. 

p3 ^ 

HP 3 

Sh 

O ^ 



, p3 p3 
bo P 

~ CO 

p •* 

_h bo 
p3 



O 3 



+» p3 



3 « 



3 a O 3 
p3 3 a 3 



3 * 
3 

1 a 
|.s 

3 

O p3 
3 cj 

a £5 



O CD 



CO 

13 ^ 

C3 CD 3 

T-l Sh 3 



03 03 ■ 

sh bo t: 
% -3 p 
^^ to 

CO -P 

HS 3 , 
CD 

O £0 

Sh 33 O 

co o p3 

CO Sh -■■ 



Sh 

O 

tH HP 

bo 3 
•5 3 k3 
K 'S C3 

5 gS 

a.g 
73 

Sh CO 



"i H o 
3 S3 CO 

"" ® p3 

>.£■% 
5h hp p3 

hp CO O 
3 3 jo 

g|-a 

03 p3 

s-fl 

2^2 
g 3 g 



CO 1 

3 CD 

3 73 
o 
g to 

.9 

O 3 

P3 HP 

CJ 3 
co o 



1°£ 



73 

CD 
Sh 



CD 



£3 
CD 
5h 

3 CD 
Sh 

Sh © 



■ 






8 ft 

; . : 

5- P P 



bo cd c 

Sh5- 
5h 2 

Sh 



g O 03 

CO 73 

CO O Sh 



•r o 



Q3 rJH 

a & . 

Jh CO 

q Sh >> 

> 3 03 

> 03 > 
03 >> 5h 
73 ' 3 

(.13 l-l 



-S co 

BB CO 
CO 

p3 ■— ' 
bo 

2 ^ 

" 03 

3 ? 

• S Sh 
O 

03 CJ 

CO 03 

3 Sh 
03 

Sh a; 

73 is 

3 HP 

> 3 

03 03 

73 3 

3 33 

CJ 73 

03 O 

-° 3 
3 03 



3 «rH 

O 

ro Sh 

3 Q3 

& p3 



<" g 

Sh 3 
03 

P3 03 

+= p3 



3 3 
pO •" 

ft 

H^P^ 

c .2 

03 a 
CJ MH 
Sh 

03 73 

ft 03 

73 



CO 3 rH 



co O 
3 



W CD 
O 73 



CD . 
CO" 03 o 

00 p3 S 
cop - 

Wfi H 

w 2 tn 

B-S ° 

^^ © 

ft CO CO 

3 Sh 3 

ft 3 CD 

03 Sh 

S3 3 j— h 

a> """ 3 
P P P 

03 O O 



R S 



3 

3 03 



bo 33 
3 o 

3 Sh 
3 



hp 03 

2 > 

3 «rH 

HH P 

3 

03 Sh 

p3 p 

53 co 



3 



03 »rH *^ 3 



ft 03 

3 rC 



3 
O 
-pj 


3 


Sh ai 

p3 
ftp 
03 




U HH 


73 


3 





73 


3 


03 


3 




rB LO 


3 


C 


-^ 


<3 




3" -H 


3 


Sh 


HP 3 




O 


r2 rfl 



ft! 3 
P h3 
Sh HP 
S 

03 CO 
B 
CO 
CD 



»"2 

03 3 
JO _ 
O C3 
S CO 



jo 73 JO 



I* 
CJ 

c l 

3 (S 

73 cu" 
CD eo 
"Sh S 

3 g 

a « 

CD Cu 
Sh 73 

CO HP 

C B 
3 g 



CO 03 

."S to 

S "^ 

r-. Sh r 

^>^ 
b3 O 

' H H 01 

03 CO * 
EQ ^gj ,. 

3*3 

tl 3 

O 5h JO 

2 CD CO 

• 5 +5 

3 03 
t-! P h3 

O Sh jp 

bo 

03 Sh 

3 5h «S 

Sh 3 

•H 03 
03 HP 

p3 co 3 

■P.H H 



3 
O 



EC 

CD 

HP 

3 
CD 

Sh 

o 



fH CO CD 

•h 3 3 
3 73 
bfl-r; co 
> CD 

■+5 rHH +* 

B "2 3 

03 3 o 

fi 73 

S >> 3 



CD 



hh CD 
O Sh 



& CD 
> 



co co cO 
'55 CD Sh 
S. * HO 

c« ,2 'a 
a •- 

<3 73 g 
a 73 
3 3 



1 73 

P 9 

to co 

03 +j 

a 

CO 03 

2 © 
3 S5 

a jo 

3 a 

.3 o 

3 s 

3 73 
3-2 

■rH ^ 

CO CD 

3 p3 

■a-t: 

bo.g 

73 >> 
<V 33 
73 3 



bo 

.5 
"> 

Sh 

03 . 

CO CO 

3 

co .2 

3 jp 
03 3 

3 r e8 
jp 

CO 

3 3 



03 03 03 
P3 33 p3 
ho- jo 

C^ Sh 

.9 £ e 

03 '•H 
CO cO 03 

^>2 

— JO o 

.9 a « 

bo 3 
o 2 



2,2 o 
bo 00 

5. BO 



co 



S)73 g 

rS 9 ® 

3 cO ^3 

H § CD 

6 3 



^ 5- 1 • 3 

o o a 
p «h a 

10 rH ., 

JO -rH 03 

"S co > 
9 bo-^ 

J HO 3 
. CO H 

>> J) P 

."S bo .2 

« 5j s: 

3 -rH 

33 - 1 3 

3 3 rg 

"« 

>» .~r-H 

3 O 

g CMr3 

-r cj 
O CM co 



3 3 

r2 '~ 

■S cc. 

CD P 

^ 3 

.©HO 

Jo CO 

o ft 

r-H bO 
rrt ^ 

3 cO 

r3 ■—< 
^^ 

>i Sh 

73 ho 

03 
73 03 

*H p3 

3eh 

CD 
Sh . 

2 5? 

3 g 

& pO 



3 03 

r- ^ 
h5^ 

03 

HO +^ 
3 Sh 
3 O 
O «H 

O co 

03 _h 

rS t 

3 

HH 

o 

3 03 



jo 3 .3 3 
3 p3 S 



SL* 



3 co 
CD 40 

h o 



O JP 

73 3 

2 Oh 
O 

rSrB 

"3 bo 
Offi 
i33 

§ 3 

p3 d 

bO Sh 

•rH O 
r2 r3 

3 co 
03 3 

^H CD 
73 03 

3 rH 

30 



73 3 
3 j3 



<i. 



CD 



03 

^rS 

_3 £ 

r3 CO 



3 rH 

o . 



CD g 



01 

o 

CO 

o 



03 3 

r, CO 

r<3 3 



73 

3 

3 



CO 



3 73 
g.g 

o: c3 

_ JO 

3 . 

O) H 

£ £ 

n cd 
CJ bo 

o 



73 JO 

S'S 

.5 3 
3 

bO br, 

HO 

§g 

3 

S 3 

U 03 

g^ 
3 

7H r2 

3 p3 

Q £ 



EH us 



J. 



Educators Hear Vice President-, HEW Secretary 
Discuss Emerging Trends, Directions for Change 



Twenty-four North Carolinians 
were in attendance at the South- 
ern Region Conference on Educa- 
tion held in Richmond, Va. Decem- 
ber 2-3, which had as its purpose 
the bringing together of national, 
state and local governments, edu- 
cational institutions, and citizens 
of the Southern Region into a 
close working relationship for the 
benefit of education. 

Among the group were two 
staffers from the Department of 
Public Instruction — Miss Marie 
Haigwood, supervisor of Elemen- 
tary Education, and Dr. John D. 
Farmer, supervisor of Secondary 
Education. The conference, a re- 
sponse to the White House Con- 
ference on Education last July, 
was sponsored by the Southern 
Association of Colleges and 
Schools. Some 400 persons from 
the 11 Southern states were 
invited to participate. 

Lauds Regional Effort 

In the opening address, Vice 
President Hubert Humphrey said 
the South has long led the nation 
in regional approaches to graduate 

University Dean Chosen 
As Mars Hill President 

Dr. Fred Bentley, 30, assistant 
dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences at the University of Lou- 
isville, has been named to succeed 
Dr. Hoyt Blackwell as president of 
Mars Hill College. 

The college's board of trustees 
elected Dr. Bentley as the third 
president of the Baptist-sponsored 
institution, effective July 1. Dr. 
Blackwell, the retiring president, 
succeeded Dr. Robert Lee Moore 
in the post in 1938. Dr. Moore had 
served as president since the col- 
lege was founded in 1897. 

A native of Roanoke, Va., Dr. 
Bentley is a graduate of Baylor 
University and the Southern Bap- 
tist Theological Seminary at Lou- 
isville. He was on the faculty of 
Indiana University for two years 
before joining the Louisville fac- 
ulty. 



education. "Is this not the time 
when a regional approach in all 
Southern education might literally 
lift your states by their boot- 
straps?" 

He suggested a "marriage" of 
the academic, industrial, and 
governmental worlds to elevate 
education and denied that the 
Federal government is trying to 
control education. Federal pro- 
grams, he said, are only a stimulus; 
by themselves they do not solve 
problems. The answers must be 
provided at the local level. Each 
Federal act and title was written 
with the "objective of stimulating 
state and local responsibility in 
education," he said. 

Directions for Change 

Gov. Carl E. Saunders of Georgia 
delivered the "regional response" 
to Humphrey's challenges by urg- 
ing "an immediate and dramatic 
breakthrough.'' He listed areas in 
which the South lags, but he also 
projected a brighter side. He 
called for regional, and for inter- 
governmental - academic - business 
cooperation. 

Dr. John W. Gardner, secretary 
of the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, described 
education as being in transition 
and suggested some directions for 
further change. The needs, he 
said, include a complete overhaul 
of teacher education, new ap- 
proaches in high schools to the 
problem of dropouts, reform of 
the undergraduate curriculum, and 
efforts by colleges and universities 
to help solve problems of the city. 

Seven different groups held 
three discussion sessions. Topics 
were: The Most Pressing Educa- 
tional Problems: A New Focus; 
Promising Solutions: New Ideas 
and Practices; and Recommended 
Innovations: Without Financial 
Limitations. The groups were 
divided in pre-school through 
elementary education, secondary, 
junior college, technical and 
vocational, community and con- 
tinuing, undergraduate, and grad- 
uate through post-doctoral. 



Stronger Speech Programs 
In Tar Heel Schools Urged 

Strengthening speech programs 
in North Carolina high schools was 
the purpose of a meeting of the 
North Carolina Speech Association 
held at Appalachian State Teach- 
ers College last month. 

The association will sponsor a 
Statewide survey of high school 
speech programs and has made 
several recommendations to the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, according to Dr. Charles 
Parker, associate professor in the 
Department of Speech at Appala- 
chian. 

Dr. Thomas L. Tedford, chair- 
man of the department at Appala- 
chian, said that high schools are 
recognizing the value of speech 
programs. He said the demand for 
certified speech teachers is exceed- 
ing the supply. Several new depart- 
ments of speech have been estab- 
lished recently in North Carolina 
colleges, he noted. 

Raeford School Building 
Destroyed in Night Fire 

The main building of the J. W. 
McLauchlin Elementary School at 
Raeford, containing 16 classrooms, 
the auditorium, heating plant, and 
administrative offices, was destroy- 
ed by fire during the night of 
October 29. A new nine-room an- 
nex was not damaged. 

Hoke County Superintendent 
W. T. Gibson estimated the loss at 
$400,000 and said $182,000 in in- 
surance will be available. The 
county commissioners and board of 
education are currently making 
plans for a bond vote to secure 
funds for replacement. Meanwhile, 
the over 600 students affected are 
attending classes in three down- 
town churches. 

Eight fire companies in the area 
fought the blaze throughout the 
night after it was discovered 
shortly after 10:15 p.m. Officials 
said it started in the boiler room 
but fire inspectors have been un- 
able to determine any defect in the 
boiler system. The structure was 
built 47 years ago. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Dr. Carroll Urges Creative, Critical Thinking 

To Gain Maximum Benefit from New Federal Funds 



"Now that the chickens are 
coming home to roost it behooves 
us to become masters of our own 
aspirations in education," State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion Charles F. Carroll told the 
Statewide meeting of NCEA's 
Division of Principals at Asheville 
in November. He called upon the 
principals to think "new, fresh 
and big" in order to make the 
most of Federal monies becoming 
available through recent legisla- 
tion. 

"We, more than any other 
group, have preached free univer- 
sal education, talked about the 
right of every child, advocated 
year-round education, pled for re- 
duction in teacher-pupil ratio, in- 
sisted on a Federal-state-local 
partnership in education, talked 
about involving the community in 
planning educational programs 
and begged for more programs 
and services," Dr. Carroll said. 

Urges Reappraisal 

He said 'change' is the most 
descriptive word in the educational 
profession and quoted Lincoln's 
statement, "The dogmas of the 
quiet past are inadequate to the 
stormy present." 

"If the present is stormy, let us 
remember that we invited and en- 
couraged the storm," Dr. Carroll 
added. Urging a testing of the ade- 
quacy of such things as curriculum 
and standard uniform class peri- 
ods, he declared that tradition for 
tradition's sake is not sufficient — 
and neither is innovation for in- 
novation's sake. 

"We want boys and girls, men 
and women, who can and will think, 
reason, and explore, who can and 
possibly will have more questions 
than answers ; who can and will 
release their individual personali- 
ties from severe inhibitions and 
stultifying influences of deadening 
conformity," Dr. Carroll said. 

Need for Resistance 

Dr. Thomas A. Collins, president 
of North Carolina Wesleyan Col- 
lege, in discussing the multiple 
pressures upon schools and educa- 
tional leaders today, reminded the 



principals that educators must re- 
sist the tendency to consider stu- 
dents as "so many IBM cards," a 
number, or worst of all, a test 
score. "We must still seek to tailor 
education to the needs of 'Johnny', 
where he is — not where we want 
him or expect him to be." 

Need for Guidance 

He said the need for qualified 
guidance is expanding more rapid- 
ly than the ability to meet it. Fifty 
percent of the youths who choose 
medicine as juniors in high school 
abandon it by the time they end 
their freshman year of college, he 
said. One out of eight would-be 
mathematicians at high school 
junior level, stick through the 
sophomore year in college. Three 
out of every four boys graduating 
from high school change their 
original career goals within one 
year after graduation. 

To the U. S. job market, Dr. 
Collins pointed out, this means the 
threat of future manpower short- 
ages in the fields hungriest for 
talent; to millions of today's high 
school students it signifies they 
will dissipate tremendous amounts 
of energy and time taking courses 
for which they are unsuited. 

"To educators," he said, "this 
must shout that there is urgent 
need for substantial improvement 
in early guidance and counseling. 
We must find ways to pinpoint at- 
titudes and aptitudes of our young 
people earlier in their lives." 

Give Them A Chance 

Speaking at a breakfast meeting 
for secondary school principals, Dr. 
Leo Jenkins, president of East 
Carolina College, wondered if Ein- 
stein were a teenager today, would 
he be a school dropout. Urging that 
high school students be given the 
opportunity to demonstrate wheth- 
er or not they can do college work, 
he reminded the principals that 
Albert Einstein flunked the en- 
trance exam of the Swiss Polytech- 
nic Institute in Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 

Dr. Jenkins said that until we 
are sure of the prognostic value of 
our college entrance testing pro- 



Brunswick Superintendent 

Dies After Auto Accident 

William N. Williams, 33, recent- 
ly appointed superintendent of 
Brunswick County Schools, died 
November 19 of injuries sustained 
in a one-car accident near Sunset 
Beach. 

He had been named superintend- 
ent by the Brunswick County 
Board of Education effective Oct. 
1. The State Board of Education 
approved the appointment post- 
humously at its December meeting. 

The State Highway Patrol re- 
ported that Williams' car left the 
road on a curve and crashed into 
a pine tree in the early morning 
hours. He was on his way to his 
home in Twin Lakes from Shal- 
lotte, where he had been drafting 
a pupil absentee control system. 
He died en route to a Wilmington 
hospital. 

Williams was named to succeed 
A. Woodrow Taylor as superin- 
tendent after Taylor resigned to 
become superintendent of Hamlet 
City Schools. He had served two 
years as assistant superintendent 
in Brunswick County, after two 
years as principal of the South- 
port School. He was principal of 
Guideway School near Tabor City 
for four years. 



gram, "we must have some ma- 
chinery to afford an opportunity 
to the so-called late bloomer, as 
well as the student who has not 
mastered the standardized testing 
technique." He suggested that the 
problem may be licked by summer 
probationary programs. 

In a concurrent breakfast for 
elementary school principals the 
speaker was Dr. Ross Coxe, Asso- 
ciate Executive Secretary of the 
National Association's Department 
of Elementary School Principals. 

The two-day conference closed 
with a banquet honoring Dr. Lois 
Edinger, a professor at the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Greens- 
boro, who is immediate past presi- 
dent of the National Education 
Association. 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



11 



Florida Educator Assails Proposed Test Program 
As Mockery of Aim to Provide Equal Opportunity 



At the 16th Annual Study Con- 
ference of the NCEA's Division of 
Supervisors and Directors of 
Instruction in Asheville last 
month, Dr. Harold Hand, professor 
of education at the University of 
Southwest Florida, listed reasons 
why he opposes setting up a 
national testing program for com- 
parison purposes. His speech was 
entitled "A Critique of the 
National Assessment of Education 
Progress Program." 

His remarks were in opposition 
to the Exploratory Committee on 
Assessing the Progress of Educa- 
tion which is supported by the 
Carnegie Foundation and en- 
couraged by the United States 
Office of Education. This com- 
mittee, he said, contends the pro- 
posed program is not the same as 
mounting a nationwide testing 
program. It says the program will 
report on educational attainments 
of samples of children, youth, and 
adults, but will not provide scores 
of pupils nor classrooms. The pro- 
gram would, the committee says, 
provide samples of what is learned 
by four different age groups — 
illustrating what all or almost all 
have learned, what the most ad- 
vanced have learned, and what is 
learned by the average. 

Mockery of Aim 

Dr. Hand said such an assess- 
ment of education program would 
make a mockery of the public 
educator's aim of providing full 
equality of educational opportun- 
ity. Youngsters who lack capacity 
to perform would become a threat 
to teachers, supervisors, school 
boards, etc., who see themselves 
open to public praise or censure 
as a consequence of student per- 
formance. Dr. Hand said only the 
most dedicated education profes- 
sional could be expected to en- 
courage less capable youngsters 
to remain in school — a certain 
receipt for an increase in the 
school dropout rate. 



He believes it would result in 
a centrally controlled, or dictated, 
curriculum and also would stul- 
tify the curriculum. Whoever de- 
termined what goes into the tests 
would determine the curriculum, 
he said. "Whatever is tested will 
be taught, whatever is not tested 
will not be taught." Even though 
there were to be only "sample 
testing," he said, the probability 
that one's students could be 
caught in the sampling would 
cause teachers to give concerned 
attention to whatever the related 
test items were believed to be. 

Stifling Effects 

Such a testing program would 
stifle local innovation and experi- 
mentation in respect to curricu- 
lum, Dr. Hand said. He believes 
there would be much curriculum 
revision — but only to make the 
local curriculum conform to what 
must be embraced in objectives 
and content if the pupils are to 
win public acclaim for their 
teachers and schools. 

In addition to the above pres- 
sures which violate the profes- 
sional conscience of teachers and 
administrators, Dr. Hand said, 
there would be an added pressure 
which is a physical impossibility. 
The testing would result in local 
pressure for every school tested 
to be above the average of all 
schools tested. And, he pointed 
out, half of the nation's schools 
will "always" be below average 
on any test where comparisons are 
made. 

Three other major addresses 
were heard at the conference. Dr. 
Hand, in a second speech, dis- 
cussed "Four Major Criteria 
Which Superior Public Schools 
Satisfy;" Dr. George White, Di- 
rector of Research and Educa- 
tional Services, School Depart- 
ment, Harcourt, Brace & World, 
Inc., spoke on "Is Anyone Listen- 
ing?", and Mrs. Bernice McCullar, 
Director of Information, Georgia 
Department of Education, chose 
as her topic, "How to be a $10,000 
Teacher." 



Raleigh, Wake Voters Okay 
School Building Bond Issues 

Raleigh and Wake County voters 
approved an $8,418,000 school 
building bond issue in a special 
election December 11. 

The county school system will 
use its share of the bond money, 
$4,210,000, to build a senior high 
school, a junior high, and four 
elementary schools. The bond issue 
will also provide for additions and 
renovations at 13 county schools 
and at the administrative office 
building and warehouse. 

In Raleigh, the $4,208,000 for 
city schools will help pay for a 
new senior high, a junior high, 
and five elementary schools. It 
also will provide for additions and 
remodeling at seven schools, and 
will give the city school board an 
estimated $240,000 for the pur- 
chase of four building sites. 

The school building bond issue 
will provide Raleigh and Wake 
County with more than 300 new 
classrooms during the next five 
years. It was the go-ahead on a 
five-year building program to cost 
in excess of $12 million — the rest 
of the money to come from the 
Statewide school building bond is- 
sue approved last year and the 
sale of Hugh Morson Junior High 
School property by the Raleigh 
schools for $700,000. 

Raleigh voters also gave ap- 
proval to a $1.9 million bond issue 
to finance sidewalk construction 
— mainly in areas near schools 
where students are walking in the 
streets. 

Ballentine Portrait Given 

A portrait of L. Y. (Stag) Bal- 
lentine, the late State Agriculture 
Commissioner, was unveiled De- 
cember 6 at the Capitol as a me- 
morial to his 40 years of public 
service. 

Two of Ballentine's grandchil- 
dren pulled the cord to unveil the 
portrait to Gov. Dan Moore and 
an overflow audience in the old 
House chambers. Ballentine be- 
came Commissioner of Agriculture 
in 1949 after serving as a legisla- 
tor, lieutenant governor, and chair- 
man of the State Board of Educa- 
tion. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Rapid Growth of Adult- Basic Education Program 
In North Carolina Outpaces Federal Fund Supply 



North Carolina's rapidly-expand- 
ing Adult Basic Education pro- 
gram program, the first such state- 
wide program launched under the 
Economic Opportunity Act last 
winter, is "suffering from suc- 
cess." 

Dr. Monroe C. Neff, assistant 
director of the Department of 
Community Colleges in charge of 
the Adult Basic Education pro- 
gram, explained the rather per- 
plexing dilemma in an interview 
with Kate Erwin, education writer 
for The News and Observer, which 
was published in the Dec. 11 issue 
of the Raleigh newspaper. 

Essentially, he said, the problem 
is that the funds made available 
from the U. S. Office of Economic 
Opportunity have not been suffi- 
cient to match the phenomenal 
rush of applications for enroll- 
ment in the basic education 
courses. 

Recruiting Halted 

With well over 5,000 adults 
waiting to be enrolled, recruiting 
has had to stop at each of the 43 
adult education centers (insti- 
tutions in the State's Community 
College system) across the State. 
The classes had been initiated in 
all 100 Tar Heel counties. 

North Carolina has not yet 
received all of its allotment for 
the 1966 fiscal year under Title 
II-B of the Economic Opportunity 
Act, Dr. Neff said, and the funds 
so far received are nearly de- 
pleted. State education officials 
had not been able to determine the 
reasons for the delay in trans- 
mittal of the funds or the date 
when the remaining funds author- 
ized would be received. 

Still Not Enough 

Even when the additional funds 
allocated to North Carolina do 
arrive, Dr. Neff stated, they would 
not sustain the program at the 
rate at which it has been devel- 
oping. 

Hopes that the critical financial 
situation would be relieved were 
aroused in late October when 
Congress approved a $4.7 billion 



catch-all appropriations bill that 
included $30 million for the Adult 
Basic Education programs, and 
there were assurances that North 
Carolina would receive an ade- 
quate share of the funds. 

When the program got under 
way in January 1965, North Caro- 
lina was alloted $831,799 for the 
period January through June. 

Running Start 

With plans for administration 
of the program through the 43 
State-supported institutions al- 
ready well worked out, it got off 
to a running start. By the end of 
June, 14,000 adults were enrolled 
in the courses. 

The difficulties in financing the 
program started in this initial 
period ; the Federal funds were 
not delivered until May. 

A second appropriation of $831,- 
799 received in July gave a boost 
to the program, but it was still 
possible to enroll only 11,000 
students. "We had to cut out 200 
classes, including 3,000 students, 
real fast," Dr. Neff said. This 
allocation began to run out in 
September, and several of the 
institutions faced the prospect of 
having to prune or curtail their 
classes. In some instances, Dr. 
Neff said, the teachers went right 
ahead teaching without pay until 
the Department of Community 
Colleges was able to obtain some 
emergency funds. These funds 
would run out by the end of Decem- 
ber, he stated. 

Other Sources Sought 

Though North Carolina still has 
$420,411 coming under the new 
appropriations act for fiscal 1966, 
these funds will not be sufficient 
to sustain the program at the level 
to which it has been built up. 

"If we had $5 million, we could 
spend it all" on the Adult Basic 
Education program, he declared. 
Currently, the Department is 
exploring other sources for funds 
to supplement the EOA funds, 
including 12 community action 
groups. 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



Pinehurst Superintendent 
Lewis S. Cannon Dies 

Lewis S. Cannon, 55, superin- 
tendent of Pinehurst City Schools 
for the past 19 years, died on De- 
cember 5. Funeral services were 
held Dec. 8 at the Pinehurst Vil- 
lage Chapel. 

A native of Laurens, S. C, he 
attended the College of Charles- 
ton and graduated from Presby- 
terian College, Clinton, S. C. He 
received his master's degree from 
the University of North Carolina. 

He taught and coached at Fruit- 
land Institute in Hendersonville 
and was principal of St. Pauls 
High School, Bethel High School 
in Person County, and China Grove 
High School in Rowan County be- 
fore going to Pinehurst. 

Randolph Voters Reject 
School Levy, Bond Issue 

Randolph County voters turned 
down two proposals last month to 
provide funds to construct a net- 
work of consolidated high schools. 

One rejected proposal would have 
authorized a tax levy of 37 cents 
per $100 valuation; the other 
would have authorized the Ran- 
dolph County Board of Commis- 
sioners to issue up to $4.5 million 
in bonds for school construction. 



Even though the Economic 
Opportunity Act authorizes al- 
location of funds to community 
action groups for Adult Basic 
Education programs, the OEO has 
been reluctant to approve such use 
of the community action funds, 
Dr. Neff observed, probably be- 
cause the adult education pro- 
grams would absorb a rather high 
proportion of these funds. At least 
two proposals along this line have 
been turned down by the Federal 
agency, he noted. 

Another possible source of finan- 
cial support might be the funds 
available for adult basic education 
through welfare departments, he 
said, and the Department is 
investigating this possibility. 



13 



J 



State Project, Special Schools Submit Reports 
For Review By Governor, Advisory Budget Body 



Progress reports by the admini- 
strators of the Advancement 
School, the Governor's School, and 
the Comprehensive School Im- 
provement Project were received 
by the State Board of Education 
at its December meeting for review 
prior to transmittal to Gov. Dan 
K. Moore and the State Advisory 
Budget Commission. 

Under legislation enacted by 
the 1965 General Assembly, con- 
tinuation of the two special schools 
and the CSIP program beyond the 
current school year is contingent 
upon the recommendations of the 
Governor and the Budget Com- 
mission. All three special pro- 
grams, created during the admini- 
stration of Gov. Terry Sanford, 
are supported partly by grants 
from private foundations and 
partly by State funds. While the 
Legislature appropriated the State 
funds for the three programs for 
the biennium, it called for a 
detailed study of each to be made 
and authorized the Governor to 
make the final decision as to 
whether they should continue in 
operation the second year of the 
biennium. 

McAndrew's Report 

Dr. Gordon McAndrew, director 
of the Advancement School, in 
submitting his report to the State 
Board, briefly reviewed some of 
its highlights. Since the residential 
school for underachievers was set 
up at Winston-Salem about a year 
ago, he said, approximately 1,000 
boys have attended the school. 

Follow-up studies on about 250 
of the students have indicated 
that after they returned to their 
home schools, about 50 percent 
made better grades and about two- 
thirds had improved attitudes 
toward their school work, he said. 
Principals surveyed predicted that 
90 percent of these students will 
complete high school and probably 
a third of them will go onto 
college or other post-secondary 
institutions. 



In almost every instance, he 
stated, the boys' performance has 
shown substantial improvement 
while attending the special school. 

Cost to the State of keeping a 
student in the school for a 12-week 
session is $377, and the total cost 
per child, excluding research 
work, is $750, he told the Board. 

'Breath of Fresh Air' 

In presenting his report on the 
Comprehensive School Improve- 
ment Project, Dr. Woodrow B. 
Sugg, its director, said that the 
massive primary-level educational 
program, which at present involves 
classes in 193 schools scattered 
throughout the State, "has brought 
a breath of fresh air to our public 
schools." 

The CSIP program has en- 
couraged numerous innovations in 
class organization, instructional 
approaches, use of specially- 
designed instructional materials 
and aids, and more effective 
utilization of teachers, with the 
aim of improving achievement of 
the primary school children, parti- 
cularly in the areas of reading, 
other communication skills, and 
arithmetic. It is demonstrating 
that local school personnel, given 
encouragement, additional time, 
and additional resources, are ca- 
pable of planning and implement- 
ing, as well as evaluating, im- 
proved educational programs, Dr. 
Sugg stated. 

Cites 'Seeding Effect' 

Dr. Joseph M. Johnston, super- 
intendent of the Governor's School, 
submitted the report on the special 
residential program for gifted 
high school students which has 
been operated as a public school 
on the campus of Salem College, 
Winston-Salem, during the sum- 
mers of 1963, 1964, and 1965. 

Each year, Dr. Johnston report- 
ed, 400 young men and women 
from the rising junior and senior 
high school classes throughout the 
State were selected on the basis 
of superior ability in some acade- 



Voters Approve Onslow Tax 

Onslow County voters last month 
approved a special tax of not more 
than seven cents per $100 valua- 
tion to support the Onslow County 
Industrial Center. 

The center became an indepen- 
dent unit in July, after having 
been affiliated with the Lenoir 
County center for two years. 



mic area or a high degree of talent 
in one of the arts. Nominated 
under a quota system by local 
school authorities, the students 
were selected by State-level 
screening and audition teams. 

The total cost of the program 
for these 1,200 students for the 
three years of operation was 
$500,704.67, or a per pupil cost 
per year of $417.25, he stated. 
Approximately half of this cost 
was devoted to the instructional 
program, the other half to facili- 
ties and operational costs. This 
total cost, he noted, does not 
include services and materials 
contributed to the school, partic- 
ularly through the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, the 
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County 
Schools, and the City of Winston- 
Salem. 

"The Governor's School has al- 
ready had a 'seeding effect' on 
public education in North Caro- 
lina and throughout other parts 
of the country," Dr. Johnston said. 
It is "a singular example of both 
the quality and the spirit of the 
educational awakening in North 
Carolina," he declared. 

"The students who attended the 
Governor's School were provided 
with the opportunity to pursue 
courses and to participate in edu- 
cational experiences which were 
not available to them either in 
their regular school program or 
in the community in which they 
lived," he stated, and the school 
"provided for each student the 
opportunity to explore ideas and 
interests with complete freedom 
and to use initiative in pushing 
forward to new frontiers of know- 
ledge." 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^ke Attainey Qene^cd fluted 



SUBJECT: Education Expense Grants; Public 
Schools; Authority to Use Education Expense 
Grant in other than a Segregated School. 

18 November 1965 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll 

State Superintendent of Public 

Instruction 
Education Building 
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Dear Dr. Carroll: 

You will recall that we wrote you 
some days ago by way of memoran- 
dum, dated November 4, 1965, in 
which we reaffirmed our previous 
opinion, dated October 26, 1965, in 
which we said in substance that an 
education expense grant could not be 
made by the North Carolina State 
Board of Education for attendance at 
a school outside this State. The par- 
ticular school in question was Har- 
grave Military Academy, Chatham, 
Virginia. 

At this same time there was also 
pending before the State Board of 
Education an application for an edu- 
cation expense grant which had 
theretofore been approved by the 
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Edu- 
cation, which grant was sought by a 
guardian to pay the cost of the 
ward's attending Carolina Military 
School, Maxton, North Carolina, in 
lieu of West Mecklenburg High 
School in Mecklenburg County. 

In view of the fact that the head 
of Carolina Military Academy wrote 
you that this school was completely 
committed to integration and that 
all applications for admission would 
be considered regardless of creed or 
race we then stated in our memoran- 
dum that this matter should be again 
reviewed because of the fact that 
this would involve an education ex- 
pense grant whereby a pupil trans- 
ferred from an integrated, public 
school to an integrated, private, non- 
sectarian school or at least to a 
private, nonsectarian school which 
will admit any eligible pupil regard- 
less of race. We are informed that 
the minutes of the Charlotte-Meck- 
lenburg Board of Education show 
that the pupil in question left the 
West Mecklenburg High School be- 
cause pupils of the colored race are 
now attending that school. 

First of all, we call attention to 
the fact that Article 35 of Chapter 
115 is somewhat indefinite on the 
racial question. G. S. 115-278 gives 
the statutory bases for the approval 



of an education expense grant. They 
are: (1) residence within the ad- 
ministrative unit; (2) nonavailabili- 
ty of a public school, "or such child 
is now assigned against the wishes 
of his parent or guardian or of the 
person standing in loco parentis to 
such child to a public school attended 
by a child of another race", and the 
child cannot reasonably be assigned 
to a public school not attended by 
the objectionable race; and (3) such 
child is enrolled or has been accepted 
for enrollment in a private, nonsec- 
tarian school, "recognized and ap- 
proved under Article 32 of this 
Chapter." 

As to the approval of an eligible 
nonsectarian school, you will again 
find under G. S. 115-285 that the 
only condition is that such a private, 
non-sectarian school is "found to be 
in compliance with the provisions of 
Article 32 of this Chapter." 

We thus find ourselves in the situ- 
ation where the General Assembly 
was very careful to state that one 
of the conditions for the approval 
of an education expense grant was 
the fact that the child was attending 
a public school in which there was 
also attending a pupil or pupils of 
an objectionable race to the parent 
or guardian. However, the Legisla- 
ture did not state that the private, 
nonsectarian school had to be a seg- 
regated school or had to be free from 
attendance of pupils of the same ob- 
jectionable race. The statute on three 
or more occasions plainly states that 
the only condition as to the private, 
nonsectarian school is approval un- 
der Article 32 of Chapter 115 of the 
General States, and as above stated, 
this approval is not based upon any 
racial considerations whatsoever. Ar- 
ticle 32 of Chapter 115 of the General 
Statutes states the duties of the State 
Board of Education as to non-public 
schools. We shall not state all of the 
details as to such approval except to 
say that it is the duty of the Board 
of Education to see to it that the 
teachers in such nonpublic schools 
must have certificates for the grades 
they teach and that instruction in 
such schools must be substantially 
equal to that given in public schools. 
The public school rules apply also to 
the nonpublic schools as to the pro- 
motion of pupils, the method of 
grading, the courses of study, and 
certain reports must be made by the 
operators of nonpublic schools as to 
the names of pupils, parents, guar- 



dians, and places of residence. There 
must be reported the attendance and 
withdrawal of any pupil, and such 
nonpublic schools must meet the 
minimum standards of the public 
schools. Nothing is said about the 
race of pupils, and you have reported 
to us that the Carolina Military 
School has been approved under Ar- 
ticle 32 of Chapter 115 of the General 
Statutes. 

In our letter to you of October 26, 
1965, we stated that the nonpublic 
school in this case could be attended 
by children of different races but in 
order to be eligible it should not be 
attended by children of the particu- 
lar race which was objectionable to 
the applying parents in the first in- 
stance. Upon further reflection we 
think that the latter part of our 
statement was erroneous and that 
all that is required by the statute is 
that the school be approved under 
Article 32 of Chapter 115 of the 
General Statutes, and you have made 
such approval. It would not matter, 
therefore, that the nonpublic or pri- 
vate, nonsectarian school is attended 
by children of various races, includ- 
ing the objectionable race which 
caused the transfer in the first in- 
stance. 

In our opinion, therefore, the 
application for this education ex- 
pense grant should be approved if 
the applicant is otherwise eligible. 

In conclusion, we have examined 
the history of this Act (Article 35 
of Chapter 115 of the General Sta- 
tutes) including the Report of the 
North Carolina Advisory Committee 
on Education which was filed on 
April 5, 1956, and we find nothing 
that indicates to the contrary of 
what we have said above. 

In the Case of IN RE APPLICA- 
TION FOR REASSIGNMENT, 247 
N. C. 413, you will find the history of 
this Act also discussed by Mr. Justice 
Rodman, who was then a member of 
the Supreme Court of North Caro- 
lina, and we do not find anything in 
this discussion that is contrary to 
what has been said above. 

We, therefore, advise that this 
application be approved. 

Yours very truly, 

T. W. BRUTON 
Attorney General 
Ralph Moody 
Deputy Attorney General 



DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-FIVE 



15 



Regional Body Accredits 116 Tar Heel Schools; 
Johnston Again Named Chairman of Commission 



One hundred and sixteen schools 
in North Carolina were accepted 
into accredited membership of the 
Southern Association of Colleges 
and Schools at the organization's 
70th annual meeting held in Rich- 
mond, Va. November 28-Decem- 
ber 2. 

Seventy-six were elementary 
schools and 40 were secondary 
schools. North Carolina is now 
fourth in percentage of accredited 
public schools in the 11-state area 
of the association, preceded only 
by Louisiana, Florida, and Georgia 
in that order. States with a lower 
percentage than North Carolina 
are Alabama, South Carolina, 
Texas, Mississippi, Tennessee, Vir- 
ginia, and Kentucky. North Caro- 
lina ranks first in the number of 
elementary public schools accredit- 
ed with over 300. 

Around 2,400 educators from the 
South attended the conference. 

Dr. Joseph M. Johnston, Super- 
visor of Curriculum Development 
in the State Department of Public 
Instruction, was elected for a third 
term as chairman of the associa- 
tion's Commission on Secondary 
Schools. 

The list of North Carolina schools 
newly accredited by the regional 
association follows: 

Secondary 
Aberdeen: Berkley High 
Apex: Apex Consolidated High 
Asheville: Hall Fletcher Junior 
High; David Millard Junior 
High 
Clinton: Clinton High 
Durham: Brogden Junior High; 

Whitted Junior High 
Forest City: Chase High 
Franklin: Franklin High 
Fuquay-Varina: Fuquay Consoli- 
dated 
Garner: Garner Consolidated 
Greensboro: Bessemer Junior 
High; Charles B. Aycock Junior 
High; Central Junior High; 
Gillespie Park Junior High; 
Jackson Junior High; Kiser 
Junior High ; Lincoln Junior 
High; Lindley Junior High; 
Price Junior High; Proximity 
Junior High; Ben L. Smith High 
Hays: North Wilkes High 



Hickory: College Park Junior 

High; Grandview Junior High 
Hillsborough: Orange High 
Jefferson: Ashe Central High 
Marion: Marion High; Pleasant 

Gardens High 
Marshville: Forest Hills High 
Millers Creek: West Wilkes High 
Mount Gilead: West Montgomery 

High 
New London: North Stanly High 
Norwood: South Stanly High 
Oakboro: West Stanly High 
Old Fort: Old Fort High 
Statesville: Oakwood Junior High; 
Winston-Salem: Bishop McGuin- 
ness High; D. Matt Thompson 
Junior High 

Elementary 
Asheville: St. Genevieve, Gibbons 

High 
Bertie: Windsor 

Clinton: Butler Avenue, College 
Street, Langdon Chevis Kerr, 
Sampson 
Fayetteville: Belvedere, Edward 
Evans, Fayetteville School No. 
10, Ferguson, Haymount, Lucile 
Souders, Newbold, North Street, 
Pauline Jones, Ramsey Street, 
Vanstory Hills, Westlawn 
Guilford: Alamance, Allen Jay 
Elementary, Allen Jay Primary, 
Brightwood, Brown Summit, 
Colfax, Florence, Gibsonville, 
Guilford, Jamestown, Jesse 
Wharton, Laughlin, Lee Holt, 
McLeansville, Miller Road, Mon- 
ticello, Nathanael Greene, Oak 
Ridge, Pleasant Garden, Poplar 
Grove, Rankin, Rena Bulluck, 
Sedalia, Sedgefield, Stokesdale, 
Summerfield, Sumner, Union 
Hill 
Hickory: Brookford, Green Park, 
Highland, Kenworth, Longview, 
Oakwood, Ridgeview, Viewmont, 
Westmont 
Laurinburg - Scotland: Central, 
Covington Street, East Laurin- 
burg, North Laurinburg, Wash- 
ington Park 
Moore: Cameron, Carthage, Farm 

Life, Vass-Lakeview 
Pinehurst: Pinehurst 
Sampson: Salemburg, Union 
Statesville: Avery Sherrill, Davie 
Avenue, Morningside, Mulberry 
Street, N. B. Mills, Northview, 
Race Street 



Librarians Elect Carroll 
To Honorary Membership 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction 
was one of four persons invited to 
honorary membership in the North 
Carolina Library Association at 
that group's biennial conference 
held last month in Winston-Salem. 

It was the first time since 1961 
the association had elected any in- 
dividuals to honorary membership. 
Others so honored were Dr. Roy 
B. Knight, Shallotte; Mrs. Claude 
S. Morris, Sr., Salisbury; and 
Meade H. Willis, Winston-Salem. 

Mrs. Margaret Kalp, president 
of the Library Association, cited 
Dr. Carroll for his interest in 
school and public library develop- 
ment over the years, saying his 
leadership has resulted in "phe- 
nomenal progress in the past 10 
years." During his presidency of 
the Council of Chief State School 
Officers a policy statement was is- 
sued by that body which has since 
served as a guide for state educa- 
tion agencies in the 50 states, she 
noted. 

Moore Judge Fines Mother 
In School Attendance Case 

The Moore County Recorders 
Court has convicted Mrs. Lillian 
Havner of Carthage of failure to 
enroll her 15-year-old son in school. 
Mrs. Havner has appealed the con- 
viction to the Superior Court and 
has stated she will appeal the 
present school attendance laws 
"right on up to the highest court." 

She testified that she believes 
racial integration is contrary to 
both Scripture and the First 
Amendment. She said she believed 
she could "fully prove this," and 
"in order to do so I have allowed 
myself to be brought into court." 

Judge J. Vance Rowe found Mrs. 
Havner guilty as charged and fined 
her $25 for the misdemeanor, the 
fine to be remitted if she would 
immediately enter her son in 
school. The judge reminded her 
that every day she kept her son 
out of school could constitute an- 
other offense, with another fine, 
possibly eventually landing her in 
prison. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



7 r Ws - 



North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 



N. 

0, 



o<£ 




iducational 

;ess 

soci ation 

OF 

,MERICA 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



JANUARY 1966 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, No. 




State Education Agency Plans 14 Projects Aimed 
At Improving Its Services Under Title V, ESEA 



The State Department of Public 
Instruction has initiated 14 pro- 
posed projects under Title V of 
the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act designed to improve 
the services of the State's educa- 
tion agency. 

The State Board of Education 
has approved the projects to be 
financed from the $357,000 appro- 
priation made to North Carolina 
under Title V for the current fiscal 
year. Assistant State Superintend- 
ent of Public Instruction J. E. 
Miller said the U. S. Office of 
Education has given tentative 
approval to most of the projects 
and the applications for funds are 
now being put into final form. 

Eight of the projects seek to 
improve the overall services of the 
State's central education agency 
and six will improve the services of 
selected sections or divisions of the 
agency. Priority was given to those 
which showed the greatest needs 
for additional resources at this 
time. 

Related Projects 

One project will provide a person, 
and secretarial help, to compile, 
maintain, and disseminate laws, 
policies, administrative procedures, 
and State plans or agreements 
which the State Board of Education 
enters into with the Federal gov- 
ernment or other agencies. The 
cost would be approximately $15,- 
000 for the remainder of the 1966 
fiscal year. 

A closely related project will be 
the providing of a single office 
charged with the responsibility for 
effective implementation, super- 
vision and coordination, and evalu- 
ation of all Federal programs. This 
office will not be the "operating 
agency" for any program but will 
be an overall administrative and 
coordinating group. Operation will 
continue to be the responsibility 



of the division or section in the 
Department of Public Instruction 
concerned with other aspects of the 
same or similar programs. The cost 
is estimated at approximately $17,- 
500. 

Staff Training 
A third program is aimed at 
increasing the competencies of staff 
members of the central State edu- 
cation agency by providing in- 
service training through work- 
shops, the use of outside consult- 
ants, visitations, etc. It will require 
the hiring of a supervisor to initi- 
ate, develop, coordinate, and evalu- 
ate the in-service training and also 
employment of some clerical staff 
at an estimated cost of $35,000. 

Planning Group 

Pointing out that the present 
structure of the State's education 
agency has, like Topsy, "simply 
growed" due to lack of personnel 
and time for more effective plan- 
ning, another project proposes to 
set up a planning group composed 
of current staffers and new ones. 
It will require a director of plan- 
ning and some research, editorial, 
and secretarial help at an estimated 
cost of $18,000. Primary function 
of the group will be to study needs, 
structure, and organization and 
make recommendations as to future 
directions. 

Statistical Services 

A fifth project will provide addi- 
tional equipment and personnel to 
the Division of Statistical Services 
in order to begin to implement a 
total program of educational infor- 
mation and data processing serv- 
ices. It is pointed out that "organ- 
izations which at this time in his- 
tory do not have effective systems 
of collecting and disseminating 
necessary information are not able 
to carry out the responsibilities 

(Continued on page 4) 



Report To Eye States' Role 
In Student Teacher Program 

A report and recommendations 
from a special joint committee 
studying state responsibility for 
student teaching is expected to be 
released by late January or early 
February. They are expected to 
materially influence teacher edu- 
cation throughout the United 
States. 

The two-year study has been 
sponsored by seven organizations 
concerned with teacher education 
and the study committee is com- 
posed of representatives from 
each. These organizations are the 
American Association of Colleges 
for Teacher Education, National 
Education Association Depart- 
ment of Classroom Teachers, Na- 
tional Association of State Direc- 
tors of Teacher Education and 
Certification, National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion, Association for Student 
Teaching, Council of Chief of 
State School Officers, and Ameri- 
can Association of School Admin- 
istrators. 

Dr. J. P. Freeman, director of 
the Division of Professional Ser- 
vices in the State Department of 
Public Instruction and a member 
of the joint committee, said find- 
ings from the study were turned 
over to an editing committee at 
a full committee meeting held re- 
cently in Washington, D. C. He 
said it is expected that regional 
meetings will be held to discuss 
the report and recommendations. 

An estimated 200,000 college 
seniors in the United States are 
currently engaged in student 
teaching and no longer is this 
practice teaching confined to the 
laboratory schools or public 
schools near a college. Today any 
accredited school is a potential 
laboratory for teachers in train- 
ing. 



(Excerpt from address made at meeting of the Division of Principals of the NCEA, 
Asheville, November 3, 1965.) 

. . . The chief weakness of far too much of our education from kindergarten through 
graduate school, is its parroting, i.e., rote learning, repeating, and conveying back 
to the teacher with minor if any change, textbooks and lecture content. . . . 

. . . The central purpose of American education is to develop abilities to think 
effectively, to communicate THOUGHT, to make relevant judgments, to discriminate 
among values. These abilities are not, in practice, separable, nor are they to be 
developed in isolation. 

As the Educational Policies Commission says, "Education must be interfused with 
the process of thinking and the attitude of thoughtfulness. Our commitment, there- 
fore, is not to a narrow and exclusive intellectualism, but rather to a program of edu- 
cation which is suffused with creativeness and innovation." In brief, we want — do 
we not? — boys and girls, men and women, who can and will think, reason, and ex- 
plore; who can and possibly will have more questions than answers; who can and will 
release their individual personalities from the severe inhibitions and stultifying in- 
fluences of deadening conformity. 

What is effective thinking? How does a person think? With what tools — under 
what circumstances — does he think? . . . Effective thinking, logical thinking, is the 
ability to draw sound conclusions from premises. And, to a degree never heretofore 
observed, there is feeling that effective thinking in almost every field rests on a basis 
of skill in handling verbal symbols; therefore, competence in one's native language 
is an indispensable instrument of learning. In most thinking, one is really talking to 
himself. . . . Conversely, to speak clearly one must have clear ideas. . . . 

Of comparable value in the process of logical thinking is the study of mathematics. 
Within the past sixty years mathematics and logic have been fused into a single 
structure. Insofar as logical thinking is rigorous, abstract, and relational, its connection 
with mathematics is obvious. 

In addition . . . , something of profound value to the process of effective thinking 
can be drawn from other fields of knowledge — the social sciences; the natural and the 
physical sciences, and the creative, the fine and the applied arts. Man has been 
described as a thinking, feeling, creative, worshipping, social, biological, aesthetic 
creature. The function of the school, therefore, is to nurture these innate characteris- 
tics and hungers. Our curriculum must be geared to this concept if we are to nourish 
the mind, the soul, and the body — "the whole child," as we educators like to say. . . . 

In the fulfillment of goals, many choices and decisions must be made. Therefore, 
education today at every level can have no more appropriate and significant purpose 
than to help each citizen make an informed and intelligent choice between the 
various major alternatives that confront us constantly. ... It is the function of educa- 
tion to help each citizen come into possession of that knowledge upon which choice 
can be made. It devolves upon education, even more, to help citizens develop concern 
for the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. It is at this juncture that new 
thought must be given to the whole area of social studies — history, geography, eco- 
nomics, sociology, political economy, etc. I am firmly of the opinion that if we are 
to attain this significant goal the social studies teacher must be the most outstanding 
scholar in any faculty. . . . 

Reference has been made to foreign language instruction. Experience reveals that 
foreign language teaching is qualitative only if done by the modern methods which 
stress hearing and speaking throughout. It is important that each foreign language 
department be equipped with a language laboratory that will work. Of greater impor- 
tance is the teacher who has competence in listening comprehension, speaking, read- 
ing, writing, and understanding of the structure of the laguage and the culture of the 
people in question. 

I would stress also the need of Vocational Education. The most profound problem 
confronting us as a society today is to find employment for our people. In this instance, 
wish is not enough. Employment must be undergirded with vocational competence 
and this competence must have as its foundation a capacity for training that is born 
of considerable thoroughness in general education. . . 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Geor- 
gia Tech, Virginia, Cornell, Dart- 
mouth, Syracuse, South Carolina, 
Alabama, Notre Dame, and Brown. 
More students are enrolled in 
North Carolina's industrial educa- 
tion program than are enrolled in 
all these schools together. . . . 
They're learning a variety of tech- 
nical skills in 33 industrial educa- 
tion centers coordinated with a 
system of technical institutes and 
community colleges across the 
State. . . . 

Editorial 12/20/65— Goldsboro 

News Argus 



In the course of less than half a 
century the United States elevated 
its educational norms sufficiently to 
give American children a median 
high school, rather than a median 
elementary school, education. 

Ben J. Wattenburg, This U.S.A. 



(Education) is a painful, con- 
tinual and difficult work to be done 
by kindness, by watching, by 
warning, by precept, and by praise, 
but above all — by example. — John 
Ruskin 



A teacher is one who, in his 
youth, admired teachers. — H. L. 
Mencken 



Power is the application of in- 
telligence to force. A river may be 
a terrific force, but it develops 
power only when directed through 
a turbine. — Glenn E. Hoover 



CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

Vol. XXX, No. 5 



Intelligence is derived from two 
words — inter and legere — inter 
meaning "between" and legere 
meaning "to choose." An intelli- 
gent person, therefore, is one who 
has learned "to choose between." 
He knows that good is better than 
evil, that confidence should super- 
sede fear, that love is superior to 
hate, that gentleness is better than 
cruelty, forbearance than intoler- 
ance, compassion than arrogance, 
and that truth has more virtue 
than ignorance. — J. M. Klotsche 



January, 1966 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Cite china Out the 2>^apautd . . . 



By the end of the current school 
year, an estimated 750,000 students 
will have dropped out of high 
schools in the United States. This, 
despite unprecedented efforts on 
the part of educators and local, 
state, and Federal governments to 
lure dropouts back to school and 
into new educational and vocational 
training opportunities. Just how, 
then, are we doing in our anti- 
dropout drive? 

Actually, we have made gains in 
recent years! According to the U. 
S. Department of Labor, dropouts 
today make up less than half of 
the nation's work force. In 1940 it 
was two thirds. A record 64 per- 
cent of the 16-24 age group are 
now high school graduates or still 
in school. 

This past June, 71 percent of our 
youngsters were making it through 
high school, compared to 51 percent 
in 1959. A record 38 percent of the 
high school graduates went on to 
college. 

Five Million 

But turn that 71 percent gradu- 
ation record upside down and you 
can see that nearly 30 percent of 
our youngsters do not make it 
through high school. This is more 
than five million school dropouts in 
the 16-24 age group — and while 
these conditions exist, the dropout 
continues to be an explosive eco- 
nomic-social threat to the nation. 

Because the pressures of the Viet 
Nam Conflict are being piled on 
top of an already heated economy, 
many of the nation's key industries 
today are suffering actual labor 
shortages. New Bureau of Labor 
statistics are expected to show the 
lowest teenage jobless rate in eight 
years. 

Today's highly heated economy, 
however, will not last indefinitely. 
Somehow we must get the facts 
across to our youngsters ! Cash in 
the pocket from a regular paycheck 
feels good, but — 

• Booming though our economy 
is, the overall teenage unemploy- 
ment rate is still triple the overall 
unemployment rate. For high school 
dropouts it is more than 25 per- 
cent, double the teenage jobless 
rate. 



• Dropouts are the first to be 
laid off and the last to be hired. 

o The labor market for the un- 
educated and the unskilled con- 
tinues to steadily shrink. 

• The dropout has a limited 
choice of jobs which are for low 
pay with few opportunities of 
advancement. 

• One in four male dropouts 
today earns less than $40 a week 
at his first fulltime job, and only 
about half earn as much as $50 a 
week. Family income for half of 
the U. S. families headed by a 
breadwinner who failed to get a 
high school diploma is $5,300 a 
year — against $10,600 for families 
headed by a college graduate. 

Many high schools over the coun- 
try have retailored their curriculum 
to offer more up-to-date job-orient- 
ed vocational training to the non- 
college bound. Many have set up 
intensive summer courses to help 
underachievers. Most now offer 
work-study plans enabling finan- 
cially disadvantaged youngsters to 
work part time in order to stay in 
school. 

The National Defense Education 
Act has helped boost the total of 
full-time high school counselors 
from 12,000 to 31,000, and educa- 
tors believe they have been of key 
importance in influencing students 
to stay in school. Another major 
incentive has been the scholarship- 
laden Higher Education Act of 
1965 which implies that any high 
school senior can apply to any col- 
lege or university and not be 
turned away because he is poor. 

Not Good Enough 

As good as the progress is, it is 
not good enough ! 

Adult educational programs have 
been developed which can start with 
those who do not know how to read 
and carry them through the col- 
lege level. Yet, it appears we do not 
have enough of whatever it takes 
to make the uninterested high 
school students into interested ones 
■ — the underachievers into achiev- 
ers. We must develop more and 
better programs to keep the would- 
be dropouts in school. 



(lUflU fart, the $a& 

While the news of President 
Johnson's appointment of Harold 
Howe II as U. S. Commissioner 
of Education came as a sudden 
surprise to North Carolinians, 
those who are acquainted with 
Howe's remarkable background, 
ability, and temperament find it not 
at all a surprising choice. 

Throughout his career, Howe has 
shown himself bold in accepting 
challenges and sponsoring innova- 
tions, and patient and persistent in 
following through the intricate 
business of administration. His 
personality blends youthful zest 
and inquisitiveness with maturity 
and willingness to consider various 
points of view. 

His unusually broad background 
has closely acquainted him with the 
multiple forces now shaping the 
face of education in the United 
States. He has experience in out- 
standing private schools, as a 
teacher and trustee; in public 
school administration, as a princi- 
pal and superintendent; in higher 
education, as a trustee of Yale and 
Vassar and professor at Duke Uni- 
versity; and in working with 
private foundations and State edu- 
cational agencies, as director of the 
Learning Institute of North Caro- 
lina. He is the son of a distinguish- 
ed educator who served as presi- 
dent of a Negro university. 

Though his term as director of 
the Learning Institute has been 
relatively brief, Howe has played a 
key role in setting the course for 
a number of significant educational 
projects in North Carolina. LINC 
is proving its worth as a develop- 
mental and coordinating agency 
and a center for exchanging ideas 
and disseminating information 
about the latest developments in 
educational research and experi- 
mentation. 

Howe sees himself as "action- 
oriented," rather than an "ac- 
ademician," as a "generalist" rather 
than a "specialist." At a time 
when, as never before, the Com- 
missioner of Education is responsi- 
ble for overseeing and coordinating 
a bewildering array of "action" 
programs, such a man is well-fitted 
to the task. 



JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



. 



Commission Offers New 
For Secondary Schools to 

New standards for accreditation 
by the Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools are being 
proposed by the organization's 
Commission on Secondary Schools. 

The suggested standards were 
presented at the SACS annual 
meeting in Richmond, Va. for 
study and will be proposed for 
adoption at the meeting in Miami, 
Fla. in December of 1966. 
© Each member school must pro- 
vide a program of guidance serv- 
ices "designed to assist pupils in 
making intelligent occupational 
choices, selecting appropriate ed- 
ucational activities, evaluating 
progress, and determining sound 
courses of action." The responsi- 
bilities of the staff member to 
head the program are spelled out. 

• "The amount of credit earned 
in summer school must be in con- 
formity with policies of the state 
accrediting agency. However, a 
minimum of 120 hours shall be 
required for each Carnegie unit 
of credit earned. No student will 
be permitted to earn more than 
one and one-half units in a single 
summer." 

• "Member schools may not accept 
credits from a non-accredited 
school except when validated by 
examination or by scholarship per- 
formance." 

Library Program 

• Each school must provide a 
library program of instructional 
materials service "adequate in 
quantity and quality to supply the 
instructional resources (printed 
and audiovisual) to assure oppor- 
tunities for breadth and depth in 
learning necessary to develop the 
personal growth of those served by 
the school." Guidelines on library 
organization, materials to be in- 
cluded, and responsibilities of the 
service are given. 

• By the school year 1975-76 the 
superintendent and the principal 
must have a master's degree and 
have also earned an additional 30 
semester hours of graduate credit. 
Major emphasis, in either the 
master's degree or the additional 
graduate hours, must be on ad- 
ministration and supervision. 



Accreditation Standards 
Southern Association 

• The pupil-professional ratio 
set at a maximum of 22-1. 



is 



• All members of the instruc- 
tional staff must have a certificate 
or college major in the field of 
work for which they are respon- 
sible during the major portion of 
the school day. They may work in 
other areas during a smaller por- 
tion of the day provided they have 
at least 12 semester hours credit 
in such areas. 

© Each instructional staff member 
must earn at least six semester 
hours of graduate credit during 
each three-year period of employ- 
ment. By 1970-71 at least 25 per- 
cent and by 1974-75 at least 45 
percent, of the instructional staff 
must have master's degrees or 
equivalent. 

Clerical Help 

® Every school must have at least 
one half-time clerical helper; 
those with 300 pupils must have 
a full-time secretary; and addi- 
tional clerical help must be pro- 
vided for each additional 300 
pupils. 

• Every school must have at least 
one half-time librarian with a 
minimum of 12 semester hours of 
study in library science; an en- 
rollment of 300 requires a full- 
time professional librarian ; en- 
rollment of 1,000 requires at least 
one professional qualified instruc- 
tional materials services assist- 
ant; and additional staff should 
be added for schools of more than 
1,500 enrollment. 

© An administrative or super- 
visory assistant must be provided 
for the administrative head of a 
school for one-half of the school 
day in schools of 500 to 750 pu- 
pils; those with more than 750 
must have a full-time administra- 
tive or supervisory assistant. 

© Minimum annual salary for 
teachers is set at $3,600 and mini- 
mum average salary at $4,500 for 
the 1965-66 school year; by 1970- 
71 minimum annual salary must 
be $4,200 and the minimum aver- 
age salary $5,000; by 1972-73, 
minimum annual must be $4,750 
and minimum average $5,700. 



State Agency Projects . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

assigned to them." Cost of the 
project is estimated at around 
$120,000. 

A project to cost $21,000 will 
set up an agency responsible for 
developing and maintaining co- 
ordination and cooperation on the 
part of all agencies involved in 
student teaching programs. The 
State Board of Education has 
adopted guidelines for the opera- 
tion of an effective student teach- 
ing program and it can best be 
developed by a close working 
relationship between all the in- 
stitutions and agencies engaged 
in the business of student teach- 
ing, it is pointed out. Widely 
acclaimed by educators as the most 
dynamic phase of teacher educa- 
tion, student teaching has moved 
from college laboratory schools 
into the public school because of the 
rapid increase in the number of 
students preparing for teaching. 
Title HI Staff 

Around $12,000 is asked for a 
project designed to set up in the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction an office to carry out the 
Department's responsibilities in re- 
gard to Title III, ESEA. This is 
the only title in ESEA which does 
not provide resources for personnel 
to implement the intent of the title. 
It permits local education agencies 
to develop innovative and exemplary 
projects and requires that the State 
education agency evaluate and made 
recommendations to the U. S. Com- 
missioner of Education. 

The eighth project is designed 
to provide the personnel and ser- 
vices which would make it possi- 
ble to initiate, supervise, coordi- 
nate, and evaluate a program of 
adult and continuing education 
for the parents of those youth 
enrolled in programs under Title 
I of ESEA — the economically dis- 
advantaged and educationally de- 
prived. It will require a supervisor 
and secretarial assistance at a 
cost of around $10,000. 

Pointing out that only limited 
educational information services 
are now provided to the educational 
agency's staff and just a bai'e 
minimum of services to the staffs 
of local education agencies, the 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



ninth project will set up a compre- 
hensive educational informational 
service and a learning materials 
examination center. Personnel and 
resources are estimated to cost 
$32,000. 

Services to non-public schools 
are now provided only on a limited 
basis. The tenth project is to pro- 
vide additional personnel and re- 
sources, at a cost of around $10,- 
000, to provide effective services 
for all aspects of the operation of 
non-public schools. 

Additional professional and non- 
professional personnel will be pro- 
vided for the Publications section 
to improve production of curri- 
culum bulletins and other public- 
ations for the use of staffs of local 
education agencies. Cost is esti- 
mated at approximately $15,000. 
Kindergarten Education 

Pointing out that kindergarten 
and early childhood education pro- 
grams have been developing 
throughout the State and that there 
are no staff or resources on the 
State level to provide supervision 
and coordination of these programs, 
another project will provide for 
these services at a cost of around 
$18,000. 

A project estimated to cost $25,- 
000 will provide additional person- 
nel and resources for more effective 
State level supervision of and 
assistance to elementary school 
programs in the language arts, 
reading, and social studies. The 
project will be of benefit to local 
administrative units in providing 
adequate programs in these areas. 

The final project will provide 
additional State level services in 
the area of audiovisual education. 
Requests for assistance in this 
area are now beyond the State 
agency's capabilities to fulfill. 
Cost of the project is estimated 
at $12,000. 



Tar Heel College Administrators Get Briefing 
On Federal Financial Aid Available to Students 



School Bond Issue Passed 

Residents of the Tryon Town- 
ship on December 18 voted in 
favor of a $300,000 school bond 
issue for construction of a new 
high school. Tabulation of votes 
showed 469 for the issue and 62 
against. 



Financial benefits possible for 
college students under the 1965 
Federal Aid to Education Bill 
were discussed before 76 college 
administrators from 41 North 
Carolina colleges at a December 
meeting on the campus of Pfeiffer 
College. 

The meeting was sponsored by 
the North Carolina Board of High- 
er Education with Dr. Howard 
Boozer, executive director of the 
board, presiding. Dr. James C. 
Moore, Director of Work-Study 
Programs, U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, covered four student aid 
programs and administrative pro- 
cedures being developed in Wash- 
ington. 

Grants Available 

Student educational opportunity 
grants make scholarships from 
$200 to $800 — and in some cases 
$1,000 — available yearly for four 
years to students with exceptional 
needs. Each college must deter- 
mine the "need" of the individual 
student and assist the student and 
his family in developing a "pack- 
age assistance plan." Such a plan 
would include scholarship awards, 
loans, work programs, and contri- 
butions from the family with the 
latter being determined by the 
financial circumstances of the in- 
dividual family. 

Colleges also are urged to iden- 
tify potential college students in 
high schools who may have finan- 
cial problems, making tentative 
financial commitments in order to 
encourage these students to com- 
plete college preparatory courses. 

Insured Loans 

The insured loan plan, Dr. 
Moore said, can be compared to 
the housing loans made by the 
Federal Housing Administration. 
It calls for the establishment in 
each state of a non-profit agency 
to develop and administer the pro- 
gram — making low interest loans 
available from commercial finan- 
cial sources. The state agency, 
with federal assistance, would 
insure the loan, and in some in- 



stances, offer a low interest sub- 
sity to the commercial lender. 

Under the work-study program 
the participating students can 
work either on or off campus at 10 
percent of the cost to the college. 
Each college, in keeping with re- 
quirements of the law, must 
establish the "need" requirements 
for the program. The work-study 
program was formerly under the 
Economic Opportunity Adminis- 
tration but is now to be adminis- 
tered by the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation. 

Loan Provisions 

Dr. Moore also noted that the 
1965 Act has provisions to assist 
colleges with administrative prob- 
lems related to collection of Na- 
tional Defense Student Loan Fund 
monies. It also provides that 
holders of such loans who teach 
in poverty areas may have 15 per- 
cent of the face value of their 
loan cancelled each year they con- 
tinue to teach in such centers. 

Some administrative procedures 
remain to be worked out and T. A. 
Guiton, Jr., Director of the Com- 
munity Services Division of the 
State Welfare Department, pro- 
posed a plan whereby the Welfare 
Department would coordinate the 
work-study program in North 
Carolina. 



New Jr. High at Raleigh 

The Raleigh city school system 
opened a new junior high school 
on December 13, housing 1,125 
seventh, eighth, and ninth grade 
students. 

The eighth and ninth graders at 
the new Charles B. Aycock Junior 
High School, located in East Ral- 
eigh near Enloe High School, had 
been attending the Hugh Morson 
Junior High School which has 
been closed and sold to the Fed- 
eral government for a new post 
office. The seventh graders had 
formerly attended Enloe High. 



JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Howe Leaves LINC to Become U.S. Commissioner 



"North Carolina loses a promis- 
ing educator and the nation gains 
an able commissioner" has been the 
thought most frequently expressed 
by educational leaders in this State 
when discussing the recent appoint- 
ment of Harold Howe II as United 
States Commissioner of Education. 

The announcement that Howe 
would succeed Francis Keppel was 
made by President Johnson on De- 
cember 18. Keppel was recently 
named Assistant Secretary of the 
Department of Health, Education, 
and Welfare. In that post he will 
have overall responsibility for the 
U. S. Office of Education and, 
through his chairmanship of the 
recently created Federal Inter- 
agency Committee on Education, a 
coordinator's role for the many 
federal programs bearing on educa- 
tion which are administered by 
agencies other than USOE. 
Unique Venture 

To accept the federal appoint- 
ment Howe resigned as executive 
director of the Learning Institute 
of North Carolina (LINC), organ- 
ized in February of 1964 to direct, 
encourage, and evaluate research 
and innovation in the field of edu- 
cation. LINC is a cooperative ven- 
ture sponsored and supported by 
the State Board of Education, the 
State Board of Higher Education, 
Duke University, the University of 
North Carolina, and the North 
Carolina Fund. It is intended to be 
a link between the classroom and 
the laboratory — evaluating results 
of research and applying them to 
practice within the State's schools. 
'Partnership' Concept 

Shortly after accepting the ap- 
pointment as Commissioner, Howe 
said that his immediate task is to 
"learn what exists and find out 
what's working." In the field of 
innovations, he foresees his role as 
implementing fully all phases of 
recent education legislation "which 
provide for tapping the innovation 
resources in the schools" and to 
make the programs really work. He 
pointed out that, under Keppel's 
direction, many new programs have 
already been set in motion and that 
he and his predecessor are "two 
of us who see things very simi- 
larly." 



Howe said he views the federal 
government as a partner with state 
and local educational agencies in 
"advancing the opportunities of 
young people." He added that 
should it become an "overweaning 
kind of partner, then this is a mis- 
take." He said there is a "real job 
to be done by the federal govern- 
ment to develop its role as a 
partner," and he expects that it 
will encounter some problems. 
Reviews Experience 

In discussing his experience with 
LINC, which he has headed since 
it was organized, Howe said: 

"I believe that I've learned a lot 
here. This is the first time I've had 
a responsibility that extends over 
an entire state. It is the first time 
I've had a responsibility that is 
focused entirely on innovative en- 
deavors and a variety of state, local, 
and university officials on a broad 
basis. I've had an opportunity to 
see from a good vantage point some 
of the problems for state and local 
officials which have grown out of 
the impact of federal developments 
in education. I think this is import- 
ant for federal officials to under- 
stand." 

Role of LINC 

Reviewing the activities of LINC 
under his directorship, Howe point- 
ed out that the Learning Institute 
helps to arrange grants from State 
or Federal sources or from private 
foundations for educational re- 
search projects requiring large 
amounts of funds. LINC coordi- 
nated the planning for the North 
Carolina Advancement School in 
Winston-Salem and is responsible 
for the ovex-all policies of the 
school. It provides consulting serv- 
ices to local school systems and has 
a major role in developing a re- 
search center in pre-school edu- 
cation at Chapel Hill. 

LINC was the instigator of a 
federally supported summer insti- 
tute on problems of school desegre- 
gation held at the Advancement 
School last summer for 100 teachers 
and administrators from the public 
school system. It has begun a 
Statewide tutoring service involv- 
ing college undergraduates in the 
service of disadvantaged young 
people. 



The Learning Institute is the 
agent for planning a regional edu- 
cation laboratory which may be 
established in North Carolina by 
the federal government. It has 
begun some work in the area of 
curriculum development and in 
adult education. And, it also 
operates a regular forum for dis- 
cussions of educational issues. 
Broad Background 

Howe is a native of Connecticut. 
He graduated from Yale in 1940 
and taught history in New York 
State for two years before entering 
the Navy. After World War II he 
earned an M. A. degree from 
Columbia University. 

He taught and served as principal 
in schools in Massachusetts and 
Ohio until 1960 when he was named 
superintendent of schools in Scars- 
dale, N. Y., a position he held until 
his association with LINC. 



ECC Considers Degree 
In Art Administration 

Dr. Leo W. Jenkins, president 
of East Carolina College in Green- 
ville, told the National Council on 
the Arts, at a conference in New 
York City December 8-9, that East 
Carolina proposes to turn out art 
administrators by feeding select 
graduate students a specialized 
diet of courses leading to the Mas- 
ter of Fine Arts degree. 

When they finish. Dr. Jenkins 
said, they would be ready to 
cement into place what he called 
the keystone to an effective com- 
munity arts program : "The suc- 
cessful liaison between artist and 
community. . . ." The product of 
the program "must be something 
of an impresario, a labor negotia- 
tor, a diplomat, an educator and 
public relations expert, a politi- 
cian and a skilled businessman," 
he said. 

The course East Carolina envi- 
sions, he explained, "would seek 
to develop a corps of profession- 
al managers whose appreciation 
of the arts, combined with the 
more practical skills of the fund- 
raiser, could bring new values 
and new satisfactions to commun- 
ities where the life of the spirit 
and the intellect has long lan- 
guished for lack of nourishment." 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Southern Association Strengthens Standards 
On Expenditures by Colleges in Major Areas 



The Southern Association of 
Colleges and Schools, at its De- 
cember meeting in Richmond, Va., 
tightened financial standards for 
colleges and universities to meet 
in order to be accredited. They 
became effective January 1. 

Adoption of the revisions fol- 
lowed a special commission's five 
year study and they change accre- 
ditation policies from generalities 
to specifics. Majority of the new 
standards related to per pupil ex- 
penditures for basic educational 
purposes. 

Focus on Four Areas 

The revised standards focus on 
per pupil expenditures in four 
basic areas : general administra- 
tion and expenses ; instruction and 
departmental reseai-ch; library; 
and plant operation and mainte- 
nance. Therefore, an institution 
must expend sufficient funds in 
each of these areas in order to 
assure accreditation, rather than 
be judged on an overall expendi- 
ture. 

Minimum expenditures to be re- 
quired of accredited institutions 
are: 

• For a bachelor's level institu- 
tion with enrollment over 1,000 — 
$805,000 plus $550 for every stu- 
dent in excess of 1,000. 

• For a master's level institu- 
tion with enrollment over 1,000 
—$975,000 plus $700 for every 
student in excess of 1,000. 

• For a doctor's level institu- 
tion with enrollment over 1,000 — 
$1,145,000 plus $850 for every stu- 
dent in excess of 1,000. 

Opinions on Effects 
Dr. Howard Boozer, director of 
the State Board of Higher Educa- 
tion, said State-supported institu- 
tions in North Carolina will have 
no difficulty in meeting the mini- 
mum standards at the present 
time. However, educators in insti- 
tutions of higher learning point 
out that minimum expenditure is 
only a beginning point. It is only 
human to judge institutions ac- 
cording to the rate at which they 
move above the minimum stan- 
dards for accreditation, they say. 
No distinction will be made 
between private institutions and 

JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



public schools which receive tax 
money. Dr. Boozer said private 
and church-related colleges will 
feel the pressure of the revised 
standards more, because of their 
limited financial resources. 

According to the new stan- 
dards, an institution wishing to 
move from college to university 
status will have to spend approxi- 
mately double the amount for un- 
dergraduate education that it 
spends as a bachelor's or master's 
degree-granting institution. 



New Members Appointed 
To Activities Committee 

Ten persons were recently ap- 
pointed to three-year terms on the 
26-member State Advisory Com- 
mittee on School Athletics and 
Activities. Their appointment was 
announced by Dr. Charles F. 
Carroll, State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. 

The committee studies problems 
related to athletics and other 
school activities and makes rec- 
ommendations to the State Board 
of Education and the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 

New members of the Committee 
are — 

Superintendents Frank James 
of Ashe County and J. W. Talley 
of Roanoke Rapids. 

Principals A. B. Bingham of 
Dunbar Junior-Senior High, Lex- 
ington; John Tandy, Reynolds 
High, Winston-Salem; and B. V. 
Smalley, Mooresville Junior High. 

Teachers Helen Wilkin of 
Chapel Hill; Mrs. Ramona Ben- 
nett, West Stanly High; and Lor- 
raine Larzon, Lee Edwards High, 
Asheville. 

Coach Spencer Lancaster of 
Price High, Salisbury. 

Dr. E. C. Bolmeier of Duke Uni- 
versity. 

J. E. Miller, Assistant State 
Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, serves as chairman of 
the committee, and Raymond K. 
Rhodes, director of the State De- 
partment's School Athletics and 
Activities section, serves as secre- 
tary. 



Walters Takes New Post; 
Mayo Heads Two Units 

C. C. Walters has resigned as 
superintendent of the Chowan 
County Schools to accept the su- 
perintendency of the Perquimans 
County schools. 

Hiram J. Mayo, superintendent 
of the Edenton city school system, 
has replaced Walters in the Cho- 
wan county system and will also 
continue at his post with the 
Edenton schools. 

Spokesmen for the Chowan 
County and Edenton City Boards 
of Education said legislation for 
a vote on a proposed merger of 
the city and county school systems 
will be introduced in the 1967 
General Assembly. If a favorable 
vote is received, the two boards 
will merge into an 11-man board 
to serve until 1971. Then, a seven- 
man board will be elected by 
countywide vote. 

Meanwhile, the two boards have 
requested a survey team from the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction to study local conditions 
and make recommendations con- 
cerning future school expansion 
in the area. 

Supt. Walters, who was midway 
through his third year as head of 
the Chowan County schools when 
he resigned last month, replaces 
John T. Biggers as head of the 
Perquimans County schools. Big- 
gers has been named area Youth 
Corps director by the Albemarle 
Economic Improvement Council. 



College Bids Approved 

Bids totaling nearly $1,250,000 
for construction of the permanent 
home of Southeastern Community 
College at Chadbourn have been 
accepted by its board of trustees. 

The college has temporary quar- 
ters in the old Chadbourn High 
School building. Four buildings 
will be constructed on a 100-acre- 
plus site midway between White- 
ville and Chadbourn near U. S. 
74-76. In July of 1966 when the 
college will be eligible to claim 
$387,000 additional Federal 
funds, a fifth building will be 
constructed. 









a 



< 
Q 

I 

o 






g H »,H 

stirs & 






_,£.£« 

H&.OW 



V. M 

. « B 
2 c-s 

f-BZ 



*0 

NO 



>- 
< 



z 
o 

< 

a. 

o 

u 



e = 

3 O 



So 

02O 



HO 



rH 


xj 


c 


OS 

CO: 


CO 

LO 


CO 


00 




CO 
CJ 


CO 


o 


CO 

in 


CI 

10 


CO 

iO 


lO 


00 




Xj 


X 




/ 


lO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


t- 


00 


x! 


X 


oo 

tr- 


10 

© 


CO 


CO 


00 


10 


-r 


•-# 


■^ 


~-f 


"** 


■»# 


co 


— ■ 




X 

T— 1 


00 


X 


— 


lO 

X 


LO 

© 


CM 

c 


00 


00 

CO 


CI 

CO 


CI 


■*# 


CO 






c- 




LO 


o 

0". 


LQ 

CO 


t- 


CM 




io 

H 


X 


CI 


LO 

© 


CO 

I- 




00 




00 


00 


OS 


o 


o 


C) 


F— 1 


CO 

CO 


cr- 
OO 


co 


CO 


-<* 

CM 


00 
CO 


o 

CO 


^ 


CO 
00 


CO 
CS1 


LO 


iO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


LO 


LO 


t- 


00 


tr- 


CJ 


-tf 


co 

X 


in 


LO 


CO 

L>- 


•— 


Ol 

00 


CO 


ie 

CI 






X, 
Ol 


© 

CO' 


o 

CO 


© 

CO 


cc 


© 

CO 




00 

O 


w 


lo 


■r. 


t- 


00 

CO 

o 


o 

00 


CO 

© 




oo 

CO 


X, 


o 


CI 


in 


e 


00 


00 


CO 
lO 


t> 
co 


to 

*-. 

OS 




O0 


LQ 

CJ 


© 

x 

i ^ 


■X 

OS 


C4 

X 


CO 

X 


X 


• o 

X 
Si 



o 
o 

u 

I 
O 



o O 

i- OC 

u. < 

o u 

>- J= 

uj s 

l i 

* 5 

2 5 

o § 

u. O 

o 

>- 

< 

i 

en 



o CI ro 



0) mj 

■« an 



t- CO CO 
<M -«# C-; 

■rji OJ CO 



© X © 

HC-00 

LO X CO 



00 t- iO 
LO N t>^ 



R M 

-J Kq 

S W J 

z CO© 



53 -2 ^ 

a H 



e x cc 

© LO LO 

fc- lO <M 



CJ "^ CO 
LO Oi ■«* 
CI CO © 



P w 

j go 

OfiSj 

z go 

Ed O 



WMO 
-tf CD >-H 
t-Q3(fl 



13 

a h 



2a 



lONt- 

■-H TJ- LO 

CI LO Tl< 



.-h O rH 
00 CO rH 
OJ CJ LO 



CQKo" 1 
WHCOcoZ 



O H 



P-CCC 



■^ IN CO 
CC ^H ^ 

CC CC Ci 



.9 S^ 



co c; 
©x 
x r- 



zuw 



^0 




-C 



: 



i 



OS 

', ;■■ 



: : 



alt 
• ^ I- 

H Sll 

. : 

Or-,j 



(0 

o 
a 
o 



u 



1 £3 "P 

£ £ « 

rt a> rd 

.(-> o a> 

03 CO ~P 



a3 03 

a) rP 



3 in 



? 2 

o o 



5- r»> 

H-^ra 

*•« c 

03 2 

P 03 3 

O c8 O 

_^ jd O 

Sh 03 

a** 

2 >>§ 

cj fa 



p A 


>, 


rd -5 




£3 o 




u 


ai 


>> & 


•■h 




3 r3 


C 03 


O -ij 


O J3 


"43 3 


+J 


C 


03 

— be 


03 CO 


e.S 


1 "c3 


O 4-; 


L &h 


'"5 * 


d 3 



.2 03 

+J o 
03 ,Q 

T3 
d Kl 

OJ 'H 



o a 

O 03 

03 in 



bO 03 73 „. 

0) 03 r3 2 

h ts "fl -d 

03 <4H O 

»3 O B 



d 03 



bo^ 

.5 ° 

'd 

d 



03 



bo a 

hi ^ 



3_Qr2£ 



<D 

■a 



bo -a 
d g 
o d 

£ 03 
<^ 

o 



a) 03 a; 

,r3. 03 03 

•Pt o 

o3 r3 

.S ^^H 



a 33 -a 

£ * 2 

H.H CO 
'O 10 0) 

13 rrn d 

r*H 73 -rH 

d 

a w 
. ^rd 

S-i h_> 

~ a 

<H J3 O 
03^ 

1 j-2 

3 £rp 

bO 3 U 

a .0 



03 >> 

rQ 5h 
03 

a <d 
I S 

P 03 



•/ 



a -a 

03 oj 

e» 

03 o 
u +° 
03 

M —1 
03 

H 
?< °3 

CJ H-> 
03 03 



•P 03 
> 

03 O 

a o 
a -a 

03 CJ 
03 
03 

bo 

2a 
a 

O rQ 

F a 

03 

e 03 

3 

rH 73 . 

O cj to 
o +» 

ra a 

CJ >> 03 

03 -D 73 



"E S >; a" 
§..£•- .2 

ft g! " 

03 03 ?-i a 

o> o 2 

73 ^ 

73 a p- o 

3 T3 73 

« §^ d 

■ o o 



+" a 15 
0.3 ^ 

a- ?h 

CI3 (13 3 

2 -W 

ra 



03 



M 03 

" 03 



03 
03 .03 
03 n^ 



03 

H 



<! 03 o 

^ d « 

• ° s 

o3 '+3 +^> 

a m 

B *+— 1 c8 

2 o 



03 

td 

03 

bo 

m 

w 

73 

a 
03 



03 

a 
_o 

H-3 

03 
73 

a 

03 

S 



j 03 

r*> 03 



a c« 

<i-i a 
o ^ 



*h a 
o .a 



03 o3 



a 43 

03 fl 



a 

03 ,2 



>. 'd 

o a 03 

^ a 03 a 



*n 03 

a m 

03 <XI 
73 

03 a 

rH 03 



a -a a 



-a a 



rQ 

03 



Q.5^ 



S co 

•2 t; 



03 03 



^a r ° 

73 03 

O 2 



r— i -rH O 

U rW <H 



<" o 

03 O 

2 ^d 
j3 bo 

03 3 

bo . 

03 S 

g a 

«a 03 



03 


03 


03 


CO 

03 


a 

03 


03 
> 


oa 






03 


bo 


^H 




O 


73 


OS 


in 




oj 


& 


03 



s « 

03 

S-i 03 

bO 03 

O bo 

■^ 0) 

P, r-H 

0) O 

> « 

03 S3 

a 

o M 

o .2 



•H 73 

a 

bo * 

a 



o 

o 
a 

03 

ra 



bo 

'a 

'3 



00 ^_ 



o 'C 

o a 

rd 03 



■3 m S 

ra 4-s 

a b d 

rH 03 3 



03 



03 o3 



S 03 



03 



03 

a 

03 03 3 D 

3 rQ rH a 



00 73 Sh I 
.-• 03 03 U 

ra ^ 



03 



a 

a 03 



03 


03 




rH 


r^; 


3 


> 


rd 


a 


03 


03 


a 


03 

rH 


s 








O T3 

03 

. r* 

-p a 
a 03 

03 rH 
O 

03 oT 

a bo 
a 



73 T3 

03 a 

^ 03 

o 



03 

rH « 

S a 

ps o 

+j 

03 

. 03 

%o 

bO - 
03 O 

•+J rH 

d o 

03 rQ 

O 03 

*h a 

03 J 

a 03 



a S 
a a 

OrJ 



O 



Or 



03 3 

aQ 



a 
03 
co 

■o S 

^ 2 

- 03 

a , 
>, 



S - fe d ^ 

■5-P ^ -rH hf) r 



-U rH 
03 

a 



O 



73 03 

rH +H 

s s 

4J a 



bo > 

a 03 

rrH ^ 

73 +-> 

rH 03 

O 4J 

U CO 



a 

a '0 

5ra 

3 bo 

co M 



a- 

03O 

r?a 
o o 

§^ 

d£ 

o - 
+J 73 

rH Jh 

03 o 
rQ m 



a ij C3 

rSfi H 

03 

2 2 ° 

03 "2 

bo 10 a 

r2r3 O 

"■p Si 

9-<H 
^ K 

. . bo 
lid 

■n O ^3 

3 ^ 

bo ff . 

a w 03 

r » h 

|^rS 
grO^O 



03 03 

" 03 



03 03 jh 

>— 1 rrt _ 



r*J 
03 m 

rd 5 

"a 

. 0) 

a a 
'rT 1 

■s^ 

03 

o >; 

03 -h 

rH O 

03 



r2 
r2f 

^3 03 

*£ 

03 rj 
03 CT 



rH 
03 
rd 



03 



03 



a jo 
g 03 

03 1 — 1 



M 1 

'a a" 
o o 



O ^ 



bo .A 

a d 

03 rd 

- rH O 

03 3 03 

73 

of § 

03 

d cj 

« 03 d 

O r-j O 

of S 

2 03- P 

03 03 



bo 



d^ 

gee 

^ a 

03 a 

o 

O rH 

rH «H 

a bo 
o a 



ofS 

03 3 

£m 

o 

r3 



r-, B- .a © co 



bo 
03 rH 

-d o3 



03 to 
&^3 

a a 

03 03 

O H-) 

o^ a 



03 00 

03 IO 
S "3 

r2«J 

03 

73 03 

03 S3 



03 



■'/. 



03 

a 
d.S 



0) 

rd 

bo O 



a 
o •s 

'■£ S 
a a 



- a 
a "3 

§ I 
u o 

rH Q* 

03 " 

a 



„- a 



o 



o 
o 

o 

o 



T3 



T3 

03 a 03 

H-> 03 O 



rH 03 

03 .^H 

.a 03 <M 



d 

O 

£ 

03 



03 O r 
• n 4JW 



03 

S ° 

So 



03 
d rd 

o +- 

2 rH 

U o 

03 m 
a 



d «h 

a o 

03 +j 

Eh d 

X3 03 

03 a 

+1 03 

03 a 



73 rH 
2t^ 

a 10 
43 ,2 
c 13 

P 'S 
u ^ 

1/2 c 

03 a 

03 S3 
3 o3 
73 o 
03 3 
£h 73 
bO 03 



03 03 

03 03 

1 * 

& d 

"^ 03 

H-< rH 

*a © 



>> b 



r-H ^ 



H-* 


<+H 


03 


."t^ 


'O 




P 


3 


03 


03 


a 


cr 


ra 


03 






-l-> 


bo 
03 

a 

03 


0) 


0) 


O 


rd 


03 


=H 


O 


b 


I.O 


O 







a t- 

73 ■* 

03 



3 >.' 



a rd 



rH ft 
03r^ 

'•^ 

03 O 

rH — 

03 r ° 
03 03 

> rd 



4* a 
a • 

• a 02 

j a 

i © 03 



«H ! 

o " 

*» 2 

c d 
g 8 



03 


03 


p,T3 




03 


M 


^H 


os 


bo 


co 




L0 


-a 



a -Sa 

rH fQ rSn rl-. 



03 03 

as -a 

r-T P 
O 

2 4* 
* d 

03 

r3 '" 

7^ 03 

.S 3 a 



> 

03 " 
1 T3 - 

> rH 03 

i bo — 



10 .2> 

C5 o) 



rS "? 

. 1— I 
03 10 

03 rH 
> 

a © 

3 rP 

CO S3 



73 "* 

03 co 

r2S 

a 



a 

V rH 

S.S 



T3 

03 

3 

_a 
4S 
a 

s^ 

£^> 
1° 

03 .rH 

-h a 

bo 03 
03 
-d , 

4J _rH 

rd '01 

.£?-« 

03 -^ 

so ^0 

I 3 
O o 

CO ;_ 

OS ^3 



03 ' 73 03 
S3 ° S 

■^ a 03 a 



p S" 



a> 03 

ST "rH +J 

.a a o 



«3 

G 

IS 
c 

03 



S3 c 

a a 
S S 



03 

r3 «H 

■+* o 



S3 S 
O § 

73 a 



^ 03 

03 '^, 

03 03 

-rJ +J 

3 d 

±2 13 

43 « 

03 

d d 

■- 1 ^o 

S3 pj 

o 5 

'a 'a 

ra 03 



M 73 > 



5 d O S3 

«•" 2 
03 3 

-3 03 73 

rQ O +3 rH 



.2 « 

+j a 

03 73 

"3 03 

o p 

C3 

03 -U 



11 

£ a 



a 

03 

6 



O S3 
O 

11 rH 

o?^ 

a. a 

03 03 

rH +J 

03 

a bo 
d 



03 I 

bo o 

r2 

Is 

d 

d 03 

•rH 03 



41 h O 
bo ' 
S3 

d 
o 



03 

rP 



^^ d £ 

W O rH 03 

00 CO 03 M 



S 03 
O 

a .a 

3 03 

P rP 



O 03 

■* a 
•p 
a 03 

03 r3 
02 



73 
C m 
03 
O 
03 _d 
03 o 
bo 03 

03 



S3 «H I 

O I 
T3 73 

03 d 03 

"S 2 >» 

o '43 _P 

ft a a 

03 ° a; 
Sag 

02 2 «° 
.ti & 



3 03 

■P till - 



o ."a 
o d 

a 



3 -d 03 „-a 



eH r^ 

03 

■a 3 
c d 
03 .a 

O -ih 

u d 

03 O 

a o 



J-i r-H O X? 



bo 



73 



S a 
a ,a 

>, I 

4-^» I 

a m 

o a 

o 3 



O >j 03 - 03 

O rH J3 a 0) 

o a 03 -a ,2 

a ° w d 2 

3S CO r2 .rH 2 

r-s 03 O 02 bO 



a 03 
2 -a 



CJ 



S ^ra 



.a 73 a rH 



b« 



, VHP J 

03 P -r " 



02 X 

O O 



02 JQ 02 2 

if 03 03 3 

a 43 bo'p 

3 Sr2.S 



03 

03 

>,rd 



"3 a 

S3 03 

.2 °3 

HH 3 

3 73 

."tf S3 



a 

o 

XS -ih 02 bo 43 



•3 £ 

~- o 

03 ° 

rd 02 

-(-> 03 
73 S3 

. 01 a 

I Q73 

a s3 
-2 So 



03 

" 'P 
O 03 

rH ^3 

a o 

03 rH 

a 

- 03 
CO 73 

co a 

GO S3 



.a fc- 



'.. 



03 
<-^ S3 3 

co a 3 T3 

t~. 03 

w 2 bo| 
o>£ S 

bO " Sh 

03 «H O 

r3 O <4H 



O 03 



"ea .a 

CO PL, 

03 > 

03 CXI 

^ 00 

03 ^^ 



a t> 

CO w 



tr IS 



a 
o 



,1 3 03 I ■— ■ 

* ' rt d 3 3 



o o 

■*-> UO 



►5, rH 

03 a 

03 03 

rH rH 

OPh 



03 ^^ 



s? d 

03 .rH 
fa fa 



.a H 



1 t- is 

r3§ 

O 03 

a—' 
a Ph 



03 

be 
03 

a 

CD 

CJ 

u 

03 

fa 

43 

be 



w 

03 

> 



a73 

03 

O |—j 

m 

S a 

S3 03 
rP 

H-> 03 
03 

o^ a 

rH S3 

O 3 

a 73 

S3 
■P So 

03 W 
t, 03 
O -d 

a^ 

03 «H 
H O 

03 -+J 

a^ d 

• rH 03 

> o 



03 ->* 

'P l6 

a 10 

03 ^_ 

^ 03 



a fi 

- -Srd 

03 +>+! 

a 

03 

rP 

O 



a; 03 

^3 Jh 
o3 o 



02 r> 

03 03 

bo S3 

03 03 

o 03 
w fa 



o co 



a w 

03 IO 



•St3- 

OJ 

02 S-i 

a ft' 
a 03 



03 rH 

a o 

SH 

O CO 

CVl' rH 

CO CM 



T3 rP 

d -a 

rH N 
O £< 

a fa 

•r^i r4 
03 

d ^a 

rH HJ 

03 

bo 

o 



Jh CX] 

3 io 

rQ — 



a g 

^ ,r- 

03 s3 
•JH 

^tH 03 

P* 03 

r3 



03 
0) 

bo 

a 03 

OJ rH 



s x 3 



03 

bO 00 
03 o 



•rH CO 

02 . 

a 00 



43 bo 
h^ 03 



bo^Jf 

a »1 



a a 
03 o 

03 s4h 
a> 

11 

r2 M 

12 °3 
03 03 

b" r" 

bo o 



o 

<H rQ 
03 

03 a 

bo c 

03 P 
-M 3 

a ■'-> 

§ « 

03 _0 

a 43 



a 
fa 

CO 

o 

rJ 



bO >^ A 

a rQ g 
o S3 
S ^ 22 

a 03 p 
ss 43 a 

-u o a 

d arg 
2 2 ss 
a ~ 



m o 
03 O 

02 

03 



03 



73 03 
03 bo 



ftl 

03 <y 

rH Sh 

O..S 

co d 
3 

03* '^ 

5R -a 

03 h-2 

r3 O 
H-> ^J 



II 

r3 a 
CJ 3 

02 T-J 



' 02 <35 



a 02 



03 

a T3 

r2 03 



a >> 



02 c3 

3 bo 



«8 US 

CJ5 CO 

C7i 



03 42 cTi 

bO o3 CO 

03 3 rH 
" 73 
P 03 03 

W S rd 

bC-^ 



d -a 



O rH 



«4H 

a a 

P 03 

01 ,d °o 

02 -|H 00 



d 


a 

03 


1ft 


03 






02 


03 


■4-a 


o3 


73 


a 


03 


03 


03 


U* 


in 


S 


CJ 


-P 


a 




r~, 



T3 Sh 

a p 

S3 0) 



a a 



03 c 

73 03 

2 S 

HH r-J 
O 

a a 

•rH 0) 



03 73 

02 O 

03 O 

Ol rP 

rH O 

CJ 02 



2 i 02 

£ * 2 

Z3 02 rH 

."a" * 

"o3 § 03 

rH 03 

.S 03 £ 

3 £ 5 

2rd- 
S H-3 r- 1 
rP J S3 

2 u d 

73 -a .a 

4J if 

rd H 03 
bO . .3 

a^ 02 03 

03 _ 03 bO 
T3 !h 

03 O rp 

> bO 03 

f (1) -P 
O -|3 rH 
rd 03 O 

03 cj a 



a: ri, 



" 03 

bo 

03 03 

d as 
a o 

bo 
■0.2 

2 d 
P a 

o •'-a 

^ rrH 
03 ~ 

a 

_ S3 



rH 02 

O -4H 

3 c 

IH O) 

0) c 

02 a 



03 03 

ra .-£ 

43 a 

«4h a 
o 

03 

■rH -ri 

02 '-4H 

03 

K" rH 

03 03 

02 a 

ift 03 
CO 

1— I ^3 

1-1 co 
03^ 

rB 

+J M 

>H *02 

a -p 

h-H 03 



co 



^H rH 

O o 

a 03 

03 02 
CJ 

rH C 
03 -rH 

ft -P 

O 03 
ID — 

o 

e rH 

03 C 

rC 03 

** 02 
03 03 

rH H -3 

O S3 

42 Eo 

^ rH 

o .a 

a 03 

03 ,3 
rH HP 



«4H CO 

O rH 

CO U 

rH 03 

rP 

r3 -r" 

+3 O 



03 Sh 

rH O 
Si 

j. 'r-3 

O 73 

+-< a 
a as 
0^ L 

CJ <" 

2 2 

a 3 
a 03 



73 in 

03 CO 
H-> (Jl 

's^ 

a rH 

^ rP 



a 1 - 1 


m 


a 


S a 


1ft ^ 


S 


•" 


-a 

£rO 





« 02 

-4-> 


CJ 


02 -rH 




03 


03 a 


a 


S3 


3 


a'" 1 




M " rH 
03 J-H 

bo*Z 

03 " 

as 03 


03 73 


as 


S-t 03 


03 


03 ^ 

■a "j 


bO . 

03 ^1 

as co 


jp 


S c 


O C3 


CJ +j 


a 03 


CJ rH 



a 4° .5 

a a rt 

H 03 rrj 
2 03 



02 02 

^rS 



«9 02 
o.-E 
p a 

r3 3 



SI 

03 a 

03 S3 

>.ra 



(11 03 r-. 

g a 2 

a o d 

r^ CM 03 

^ d 02 

JS 03 03 

c rd ■£ 

03 H-J S3 



02 03 

o o 
> E 

03 

rH T3 

a 03 
-4-J 

03 O 

rd a 

+J 03 



a: co e-i a 



B H 5 3 

bOrH 

d 

B-§ 

r<3 "P 

a 2 

< S3 

M "a 

03 a 

03 o 

a o 



a 02 



03 a 

03 r-> 

bo ., 

r2 > 

°a 

rH .E 

.2 Et 

C rrH 

3 ^3 

•a, 03 

a ft 
£ 



03 03 -H4 
ftr3 co 

•rH H-5 0J 



rH a 

cu 53 

a 02 



BO 



03 

bo 

c - a 
03 a 
5h a 



-4J IP 

a co 

03 OS 

CJ rH 



o 


« CO 



73 

a 

03 

03 
a >, 

03 £1 
-4-P 

-a 

rH 03 

03 -IH 

j3 S3 
+3 



«4H 




CJ 


O 


Z-I 


a 







"rH 




<H 




a 




03 


a 


03 


73 


in 


•y. 


S3 


^H 


O 


CJ 


a 

a 


rP 


03 
73 


2 


rd 


4-> 

03 

03 

a 




CJ 


+J 

& 



03 bo 

,3 a 



O 73 CO 

a 5 



Sr2 

<4H 
C rd 

a h-> 



State's Self-Insurance of Schools Program 
Increases Over $350 Million in 16 Years 



Insurance in force under the 
North Carolina Public School In- 
surance Fund has increased by 
$351,349,255 during the 16 years 
since the program began, a study 
of the June 30, 1965 fiscal report 
reveals. 

The State's program of self- 
insurance of public school buildings 
and contents was begun in 1949 
when the General Assembly took 
$2 million from the State Literary 
Fund to get the program under 
way. The insurance fund was set 
up because of a 25 percent hike 
that year in private insurance rates 
for public school buildings and, 
also, it was hoped that the premi- 
ums paid by school units could 
eventually be eliminated by using 
investment income to pay all losses. 

Surplus Maintained 

To date the fund has been unable 
to eliminate the premium. A reserve 
equal to five percent of the insur- 
ance in force would be needed in 
order to pay its losses with invest- 
ment income. However, the $2 mil- 
lion has been repaid long ago and 
the fund has managed to keep a 
good surplus on hand ever since. 

State Board of Education Con- 
troller A. C. Davis pointed out to 
the State Board of Education 
recently that the fund had, at the 
end of the 1964-65 year, an accumu- 
lated surplus of $3,276,890. This 
despite fire losses being the second 
heaviest in the program's history. 
During the fiscal year specifically 
earned premiums totaled $557,438 
but fire and other losses totaled 
$529,685 — making the loss ratio to 
earned premiums for the year 95 
percent. 

Variable Losses 

However, other years have seen 
the loss ratios as low as 20 percent. 
The only year which had greater 
losses than the immediate past 
fiscal year was 1959 when fire losses 
were $565,833 — pushing the loss 
ratio to 103 percent. 

Last year's heavy loss figure 
resulted primarily from school fires 
in Rutherford County (loss of 
$235,297) and the city of Goldsboro 
(loss of $155,400). 



A total of 67 school administra- 
tive units still insure their build- 
ings through private insurance 
companies. These include all the 
large, populous urban units. Of the 
102 administrative units insured by 
the fund, 69 are county units and 
33 are city units. 

Different Advantages 

Fund Director Thomas B. Win- 
borne explained the interest of 
county units as opposed to the less- 
er interest of the large metro- 
politan area units. The savings of 
the city units under the fund are 
less in terms of actual dollars than 
the savings of county units, he 
pointed out. This is because insur- 
ance rates in the better-protected 
urban areas are lower than in the 
more rural areas. 

Also, Winborne said, the insur- 
ance industry is located in the 
cities. Many private insurance 
agents are outstanding civic leaders 
— working with school boards, help- 
ing with school bond issues, etc. He 
said it is only natural that school 
boards would investigate buying 
school insurance from these fellow 
citizens. 



High IQ Bowl Event Slated 

The Youth Community Center 
Association at Greensboro has in- 
vited 30 high schools in that area 
to participate in the 1966 "High 
I.Q. Bowl" — teams of four students 
each competing in the fast recall 
of facts in the areas of English, 
math, science, history, and human- 
ities. 

The 1966 Bowl will be held on 
February 19 at University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro's 
Elliott Hall. All but two teams will 
be eliminated and these will com- 
pete later in February or early in 
March on the "US" show on 
WFMY-TV. Pat Bullard, "US" 
chairman, is now in the process of 
securing questions and personnel. 
Last years' questions came from 
Service Research Association, the 
Educational Testing Service, and 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 



Former VR Unit Counselor 
Killed in Viet Nam Combat 

Lieutenant William E. Davis, 
Jr., 24, of Raleigh, formerly a 
counselor in the Vocational Re- 
habilitation Division of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
was killed in action in Viet Nam 
on Dec. 10. He is believed to be 
the first Raleigh native to die 
there since the onset of hostili- 
ties. 

Davis was a rehabilitation coun- 
selor at the Cherry Hospital- 
O'Berry Center Vocational Re- 
habilitation Facility in Goldsboro 
for about three months prior to 
entering military service. He was 
a graduate of Ligon High School 
in Raleigh and Agricultural and 
Technical College in Greensboro. 
Attached to the First Infantry 
Division, he had been in Viet Nam 
only a month before his death. 

Funeral services were held Dec. 
23 at Raleigh. He is survived by 
his parents and one sister. 



Pioneer Educator Dies 

Dr. Early Hampton Moser, 85, 
a former teacher, principal, super- 
intendent, and staffer in the De- 
partment of Public Instruction, 
died January 1 at Wendell-Zebu- 
lon Hospital. Funeral was held in 
Zebulon Methodist Church and 
burial was in Gethsemane Memor- 
ial Gardens in Zebulon. 

Dr. Moser attended Western 
Maryland College and did gradu- 
ate work at the University of 
North Carolina. He began teach- 
ing in Dover in 1907 after which 
he served as superintendent of 
Wakelon School in Zebulon and 
later superintendent of the Wake- 
lon School District. He had been 
principal of schools in Selma and 
Wendell. Following his retirement 
in 1942 he worked with the De- 
partment of Public Instruction to 
improve the school bus system 
and prior to retirement he had 
worked through the Department 
to establish agricultural training 
in school curricula. 

Surviving are the wife, Myrtle 
Folger Moser, of the home in 
Zebulon; two sons, a brother, four 
sisters, and two grandchildren. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Surveys Investigate Goals and Special Class 
Benefits Among State's Talented Students 



Two recent surveys made among 
school children in classes for the 
exceptionally talented reveal the 
students judge themselves as having 
benefited from the special classes 
and that their goals are closely 
associated to their immediate en- 
vironment. 

During the current school year 
there are around 10,000 students 
in North Carolina participating in 
special classes for the exceptionally 
talented. There are 236 teachers in 
the program. 

On a self-rating questionnaire 
answered by 1,100 of the students, 
69 percent felt they had improved 
academically and socially since 
entering the special classes. An 
average of 29 percent felt they 
remained the same and two percent 
felt they had decreased in their 
development. All had been involved 
in the special education program 
for a year or more. 

Positive Response 

Dr. Gene Burnette, supervisor 
of Special Education for the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
explained that each student was 
asked to "think of yourself at the 
present time in comparison to your 
entrance in the special project, and 
rate yourself on the items listed" 
as to "greater" achievement, the 
"same," or a "decrease" in achieve- 
ment. Thirty-five areas were cover- 
ed and the students showed a high 
degree of positive emphasis on the 
listed variables. 

Responding with an average 
rating of "greater" were 82 per- 
cent of the elementary students, 
75 percent of those in junior high 
school, and 60 percent of those in 
senior high school. The item 
drawing the largest number of 
"greater" answers, 82 percent, 
was in connection with "ability 
to use many instructional media." 
Other items receiving high posi- 
tive ratings included "ability to 
think things out for myself;" 
"understanding of self, strengths, 
and weaknesses;" "ability to rec- 
ognize the difference between 
facts and opinions," and "sense 
of values." 

The fewest positive responses 

JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



were in connection with "leader- 
ship ability" with only 51 percent 
feeling their leadership ability 
had improved with the special 
classes. The largest number re- 
porting a "decrease" on any item 
was eight percent — those feeling 
their participation in extracur- 
ricular activities since entering 
the special classes had declined. 
Quiz on Objectives 

The second survey was made, 
Dr. Burnette said, in an effort to 
relate educational objectives to 
student aspirations. Exceptionally 
talented students were selected 
from cities with a population of 
100,000 or more; cities within the 
population range of 25,000 to 
50,000; and rural, no cities with 
a population of more than 10,000. 
All were asked the same two 
questions: "What three things do 
you want most during the next 
year?" and "What are three 
things you want most when you 
have finished school?" 

In response to the first ques- 
tion which indicated immediate 
goals 71 percent of all the re- 
sponses related to school with 
such answers as "I would like to 
be on the cheerleading squad," 
or "I want to improve my grades 
in all subjects." Ninety-four per- 
cent of the answers from students 
in the intermediate grades re- 
lated to school as did 53 percent 
of the answers from those in 
junior high school and 75 percent 
of the answers from those in 
senior high. 

Variations Noted 

In the school category the im- 
mediate wants of the exception- 
ally talented students showed a 
large downward shift from inter- 
mediate to junior high. However, 
a reversal took place from the 
junior high to the senior high 
category and the percentage of 
responses remained far greater in 
the school-related wants than in 
any other single category. 

Other categories were : other 
people, nine percent of all an- 
swers; self, six percent; things, 
four; fun, four; travel, two; and 
civic affairs, family, work, and 



religion each drew one percent of 
all answers. 

In response to the second ques- 
tion, which should indicate long- 
range goals, the results revealed 
1,434 replies classified into nine 
categories — school being the only 
one left out of the categories 
covered in answers to the first 
question. Sixty-one percent of all 
answers related to work such as 
"to find a job that suits me" or 
"to become a doctor." Next high- 
est category related to family 
with 17 percent with answers 
such as "a happily married life" 
or "a good home." Answers re- 
lating to self drew seven percent; 
travel, five percent; things, four; 
other people, three; and civic af- 
fairs, fun, and religion each re- 
ceived one percent. 

Sixty-seven percent of the inter- 
mediate students put work related 
answers first; 59 percent of the 
junior high school students did; 
and 55 percent of the senior high 
students. Family was first for 10 
percent of the intermediates, for 
17 percent of those in junior high, 
and 19 percent for the seniors. 

Main Conclusions 

The results indicate that excep- 
tionally talented children have 
goals much more closely in line 
with the traditional pattern of 
school-work-family than many of 
their teachers assume, Dr. Bur- 
nette said. Goals, as voiced by the 
students, are specific and pertain 
closely to the environment in 
which the students find them- 
selves. 



Math Summer Institute 

St. Augustine's College at Ra- 
leigh has received a $38,690 grant 
from the National Science Foun- 
dation to conduct a 1966 summer 
institute in mathematics for sec- 
ondary school teachers. 

Forty teachers will be accepted 
for the institute to run from June 
20 through July 29. Each teacher 
will receive $75 per week, plus $15 
for each dependent, and a travel 
allowance of four cents a mile. 



n 



_ 



Around 9,000 Teenagers Now Participating 
In 18 Neighborhood Youth Corps Projects 



By mid-December 5,490 youth 
aged 16 to 21 years in North Caro- 
lina were being assisted through 
15 Neighborhood Youth Corps 
projects which have been approved 
and funded since June 30, 1965. 

In addition, three projects in the 
State are operating on extensions 
of approvals and previously award- 
ed funds. They plan to submit new 
requests when these funds are ex- 
hausted. These projects are Tri- 
County Community Action, Inc. 
(Rockingham, Robeson, and Scot- 
land Counties) with 2,135 In- 
School students and 153 in the 
Out-of -School program at the time 
the project was originally funded; 
Craven County Operation Prog- 
ress, Inc., with 267 In-School and 
765 Out-of-School ; and the Eastern 
Band of Cherokee Indians with 
149 In-School participants. 
Now in Operation 

This means a total of 18 NYC 
projects are currently operating in 
the State and a total of 8,958 North 
Carolina youth are participating in 
the program. 

The NYC program was author- 
ized under the Economic Oppor- 
tunity Act of 1964. The In-School 
programs are for students enrolled 
in high school and the Out-of- 
School programs are for school 
dropouts. In each, part-time work 
is provided in connection with 
study and training programs. 

Of the 15 projects approved dur- 
ing the current fiscal year, local 
funds involved amount to $724,- 
128.48 and Federal funds total 
$4,229,844.97 for an overall expen- 
diture of $5,023,973.45 by the end 
of the current fiscal year on June 
30, 1966. 

On the first anniversary of ap- 
propriations being made available 
for the program last October, 
George Glasheen, NYC Regional 
Director for the U. S. Department 
of Labor, declared that "the pro- 
gram has exceeded our carefully 
considered goals in North Carolina 
and throughout the nation." 

"It is difficult to summarize the 
program, but the documented evi- 
dence of salvaged lives, of in- 
creased hope, and other encourag- 



ing signs is visible everywhere," 
he said. During the first calendar 
year, nine North Carolina projects 
had cost $2,407,452 in Federal 
funds. Approximately 10 percent 
of that amount was spent in local 
funds. In most instances local 
funds include a variety of services 
and facilities in lieu of actual cash. 

Split Projects 

Five of the 15 North Carolina 
programs approved this year in- 
clude both In-School and Out-of- 
School projects. Operation Break- 
through, Inc. in Durham County 
serves 670 high school students and 
404 youths out of schools; Experi- 
ment in Self-Reliance in Forsyth 
County, 330 in school, 236 out; 
Martin County Community Action, 
Inc., 269 in, 56 out; Salisbury- 
Rowan Community Service Coun- 
cil, Inc., 186 in, 173 out; and Wa- 
tauga, Avery, Mitchell, and Yancey 
Counties Community Action, Inc., 
324 in, 312 out. 

In-School Projects 

Strictly In-School NYC projects 
newly approved are being spon- 
sored by the Burlington Board of 
Education with 200 students par- 
ticipating; Opportunity Corp. in 
Buncombe County, 508 students; 
Caswell County Action Committee, 
133; Chatham County Community 
Action, Inc., 100; Henderson 
County Board of Commissioners, 
200; Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board 
of Education, 500; Rockingham 
County Fund, Inc., 185; Sampson 
County Board of Education, 300; 
Raleigh Board of Education, 204; 
and Wilkes County Community Ac- 
tion Committee, 200. 

As North Carolina Public School 
Bulletin prepared to go to press 
the Wake County Board of Edu- 
cation was expecting approval of 
a project designed to give 403 high 
school students part time jobs; the 
Bladen County Board of Education 
was expecting approval of an In- 
School project involving 162 stu- 
dents; and the Cleveland County 
Association of Governmental Offi- 
cials was expecting approval of an 
In-School project for 232 students. 



AVA Elects T. Carl Brown 
To Vice Presidential Post 

T. Carl Brown, State supervisor 
of Distributive Education, was 
elected vice president of the 
American Vocational Association 
for Distributive Education at the 
AVA's Convention at Miami Beach 
in mid-December. 

Brown, who has headed the Dis- 
tributive Education staff of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction for a total of nearly 25 
years, has been active in the na- 
tional association since 1939. He 
was the author of the Distributive 
Education Section of the AVA 
Journal's Golden Anniversary issue 
and represented the association's 
Distributive Education Division on 
the AVA committee which de- 
veloped guidelines for the Voca- 
tional Education Act passed by 
Congress in 1963. 

A native of Statesville, he is a 
graduate of Mars Hill College and 
a magna cum laude graduate of 
Wake Forest College. He holds 
the master's degree from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and has 
done additional graduate work at 
the New York University School 
of Retailing and North Carolina 
State University. 

A colonel in the active reserve, 
National Guard, he served in the 
Army during World War II. 

During the quarter-century he 
has headed the State's Distribu- 
tive Education program, the num- 
ber of secondary school students 
enrolled has grown from 26 to 
7,459 and total expenditures for 
the program have jumped from 
about $11,000 to more than 
$800,000. The number of adults en- 
rolled in DE training programs in- 
creased from 2,327 in 1939-40 to 
9,184 in 1962-63, after which time, 
the adult training program was 
assigned to the new Department 
of Community Colleges. 

One of the organizers of the 
Distributive Education Clubs of 
America, Brown has served as 
president of the national organiza- 
tion and is now a member of its 
National Advisory Committee. 
North Carolina ranked third in 
the nation in DECA membership 
last year. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Attendance Counseling Program Proving Worth 



The State-supported program of 
attendance counseling for public 
schools is only in its third year 
and already is proving its worth. 

Interviews with a representative 
sampling of superintendents found 
them agreed that an improvement 
can be noted in attendance records 
and in the grades of students who 
previously were "attendance prob- 
lems." 

Although the office of attendance 
counselor was created in 1913, it 
was not until the 1963-64 school 
year that State funds were made 
available to support the program. 
In school units without local sup- 
plements to provide such counsel- 
ing, this work was the duty of 
already overworked welfare de- 
partment personnel. 

Results Reported 

While the attendance counselor's 
first duty is to enforce the com- 
pulsory attendance law (requiring 
school attendance up to age 16 
years), several superintendents in- 
terviewed credit the counselor with 
persuading numerous students over 
16 to remain in school through 
graduation. They also said the pro- 
gram is proving effective in elimi- 
nating causes for inattendance, 
bringing about support from pre- 
viously disinterested parents, and 
stimulating many students to new 
achievements. 

State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction Dr. Charles F. Carroll 
recently credited the program with 
playing a large part in the in- 
creased number of first graders 
who will eventually graduate from 
high school. He told the State 
Board of Education that current 
statistics indicate more than 60 
percent of all students entering 
the first grade can now be counted 
on to graduate. 

Improvements Seen 

In addition to freeing local sup- 
plement funds for an increased 
number of attendance counselors in 
some of the larger administrative 
units, the State-financed program 
shows an increased number of posi- 
tions and improvement in both 
training and experience of those 
being hired to fill the positions. 

JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



A total of 141 of the 142 State 
Board-approved counselor positions 
have been filled for the 1965-66 
school year as compared to 124 
such posts filled during the 1963- 
64 year. During the first year 61 
counselors had no previous experi- 
ence in this type of work and dur- 
ing the current year only 18 joined 
the ranks without previous experi- 
ence. The number of counselors 
with three to four years of college 
training has increased to 53 from 
41. Those with at least five years 
of college training increased from 
20 to 24 and the number of coun- 
selors with one to two years of 
college increased from 34 to 38. 

The number of attendance coun- 
selors with only a high school 
education remains the same, 18, 
while those with less than high 
school formal training decreased 
from 11 to 8. Thirty-eight of the 
smaller school units share 17 state- 
paid counselors; eight units have 
two each ; one combined city-county 
unit has three; and another city- 
county combination — the largest 
in school population in the State — ■ 
has seven. 



ESEA Title II Guidelines 

Reviewed at Area Meetings 

Staff members of the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction were 
involved in four area meetings 
this month in the interest of im- 
plementing Title II, "School Li- 
brary Resources, Textbooks, and 
Other Printed and Published Ma- 
terials," under the Elementai-y 
and Secondary Education Act. 

Manuals for preparation of 
projects under the act, prepared 
by the Library and Instructional 
Materials Services of the Division 
of Instructional Services, were 
given out and discussed with 
those in attendance from the vari- 
ous school units. Meetings were 
held in Edenton on January 6; 
Raleigh, January 7; Asheville, 
January 11; and Salisbury, Janu- 
ary 12. 



Stephens Named Supervisor 
of State's DCVE Program 

Tommie N. Stephens of Frank- 
linton has been named State 
Supervisor of Diversified and 
Comprehensive Vocational Edu- 
cation in the State Department of 
Public Instruction, according to 
A. G. Bullard, Director of the 
Division of Vocational Education. 

Stephens joined the Depart- 
ment's staff on Feb. 1, 1965 as 
Assistant State Supervisor of 
Diversified and Comprehensive 
Vocational Education. In his new 
post, he succeeds Charles I. Jones, 
who resigned as of Dec. 31 to 
become an assistant professor of 
education at North Carolina State 
University. He will be in charge 
of supervising student teachers in 
Agricultural Education. 

Jones had headed the Diversi- 
fied and Comprehensive Vocation- 
al Education program since last 
spring. He was Assistant State 
Supervisor from August 1964 to 
March 1965. He was named State 
Supervisor in June. 

One of the newest phases of the 
State Vocational Education pro- 
gram, the Diversified and Compre- 
hensive Vocational Education pro- 
gram, consists of occupational 
survey courses at the ninth and 
tenth grade levels. It was initiated 
in 1963-64 with an enrollment of 
2,410 students in 45 schools. It 
has expanded to involve 13,554 
students in 208 schools this year. 

Stephens, a native of Wake 
County, is a graduate of Cary 
High School and holds the B. S. 
and M. Ed. degrees in Agricultural 
Education from N. C. State Uni- 
versity. He has done additional 
graduate work in school admini- 
stration at the University of North 
Carolina and Duke University. He 
was a vocational agriculture 
teacher at Franklinton High 
School for 15 years prior to join- 
ing the State staff. For two years 
he also served as an Introduction 
to Vocations teacher at Franklin- 
ton. His wife, the former Isabel 
Britt of Cary, teaches biology, 
physics, and chemistry at Frank- 
linton High. 



13 



_ 



State-Sponsored Program 
For Tourist Industry; Deg 

A program to help train persons 
connected with the State's tourist 
industry was authorized by the 
State Board of Education, through 
its Department of Community Col- 
leges, in January of 1965. A year 
later it had given training to over 
3,000 persons, and a degree pro- 
gram consisting of a two-year cur- 
riculum is expected to be in opera- 
tion at a number of the State's 
community colleges, technical in- 
stitutes, and industrial education 
centers by the fall of 1966. 

Currently 1,354 persons are in- 
volved in 47 classes in nutrition 
and menu planning through the 
cooperative effort of the Extension 
Program Section of the Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges; the 
School Food Services, Division of 
Vocational Education; and the 
North Carolina Education Televi- 
sion Network, Channel 4 at Chapel 
Hill and Channel 2 at Columbia. 
J. D. Foust, supervisor of Tourist 
Training for the Extension Pro- 
gram Section, explained that these 
classes consist of two hours of 
classroom work each week, 30 
minutes of which is television in- 
struction using the techniques and 
curriculum developed by School 
Food Services. 

Community Courses 

In addition, Community Host 
Schools — designed to provide bet- 
ter hospitality to visitors to tourist 
areas — are giving courses in such 
things as front office procedure, 
hotel-motel accounting, housekeep- 
ing, waitress training, and human 
relations. In some communities 
this hospitality training has grown 
beyond the travel industry, Foust 
said. Many hospitals, for instance, 
are benefiting from the food ser- 
vices and housekeeping courses. 
And, the program is not all food 
and lodging. Service people of all 
kinds are participating — police, 
service station attendants and me- 
chanics, restaurant personnel, peo- 
ple involved in both public and 
private transportation operations, 
and those concerned with private 
and public recreation facilities. 

Meanwhile, a two-year curricu- 
lum is being planned in recreation 



Training Personnel 
ree Course Planned 

technology, chef training, food ad- 
ministration, hotel-motel manage- 
ment, etc. Additional short in- 
service courses are being planned 
to help those already trained keep 
up-to-date on new and improved 
methods. 

Program Staff 

Three area coordinators assist 
Foust with setting up these hospi- 
tality education classes and they 
also are working with community 
colleges, technical institutes, and 
industrial education centers in pre- 
paring for the degree programs to 
get underway next fall. They are 
Mrs. Alleene Rodgers, serving the 
Piedmont area out of Sandhills 
Community College in Southern 
Pines ; W. K. Dorsey, serving the 
Eastern area of the State from 
Cape Fear Technical Institute in 
Wilmington; and James Cox, serv- 
ing the Western area from Ashe- 
ville-Biltmore Technical Institute 
at Asheville. 

Foust explained that for the ex- 
tension courses instructors are 
hired on a part-time basis and are 
picked from among professional 
people in the communities where 
the courses are given. They are 
paid from enrollment fees. "We try 
to get the best person in his field 
in the area and, hopefully, someone 
who has experience in teaching," 
he said. "If the course is in hotel 
or motel law, naturally we'd get a 
lawyer. If in accounting, a CPA. If 
in motel management, we'd want 
an outstanding person in the field. 
We select the best teachers for the 
subject at hand." 

He does not believe the two-year 
degree program being planned or 
the short courses now under way 
will conflict with a proposed four- 
year college degree program being 
pushed by some leaders in the 
tourist industry. The four-year 
program is proposed for develop- 
ment of a curriculum to train 
motel, hotel, and restaurant people 
within existing programs of the 
State's institutions of higher 
learning. 

Foust said such a program would 
reach only top management people 
and "I do not expect it would con- 
flict with anything we are doing." 



Herring Says Tech Units 
Boost 'Education for All' 

Speaking in Lumberton at an 
open house and tour of the Robe- 
son County Extension Unit of the 
Fayetteville Technical Institute 
last month, Dr. Dallas Herring, 
chairman of the State Board of 
Education, declared that such 
institutions are signs that the 
"people of this State are follow- 
ing in the footsteps of Aycock, 
the Joyners and others who 
dreamed of a full education for 
all of the people of North Caro- 
lina." 

He listed consolidation of 
schools as another step toward 
strengthening education and at- 
taining the goal of "a full educa- 
tion for all." Much remains to be 
done, he added. Of the children 
who enter the first grade, only a 
small portion finish a four-year 
college, he observed. About 85 per- 
cent of North Carolina's stu- 
dents do not reach their educa- 
tional potential — including those 
who leave school without full 
preparation to survive and con- 
tribute to the economy and culture 
of the State. 

Set Up in 1957 

When Community Colleges were 
set up in 1957 to meet the needs 
of these citizens, he said, there 
was a tendency to think of such 
schools as only "dumping 
grounds" for those who can not 
meet full college standards. At 
first technical training was limited 
to basic skills, but it is now being 
greatly broadened, he observed. 
The student not only finds a place 
to learn basic skills, but he also 
finds the opportunity to remedy 
faulty education of the past. "The 
result can mean only one thing, 
more meaningful and more pro- 
ductive citizens." 

In developing full citizens 
money spent on education is not 
"cost" but an "investment," he 
said. "Such an investment in the 
State's greatest asset, its human 
resources, pays for itself over and 
over again with a high yield in 
returns." 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^Ue Attainey Qen&ial (lulel . . . 



Double Office Holding — Public Officials 
On School Advisory Councils 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 
In your letter of November 24, 
1965, you asked to be advised as 
to whether "persons holding elected 
or appointed governmental offices 
could serve on school advisory 
councils (pursuant to G. S. 115-70) 
without being in violation of . . . 
dual office holding." 

There are many legal opinions 
and decisions of the Courts as to 
what does or does not constitute a 
public office. There is no exact 
criterion and perhaps this subject 
is not susceptible of concrete and 
precise definitions. A public office, 
according to the text writers, em- 
braces the ideas of tenure, dura- 
tion, powers and duties. Perhaps, 
the most satisfactory test of a 
general nature distinguishing a 
public office is the fact that the 
creation of such an office involves 
some part of the sovereign power 
or functions of Government, either 
executive, judicial, or legislative. 



The last paragraph of G. S. 115- 
70 reads in part as follows: 

"A county board of education 
may appoint an advisory 
council for any school or 
schools within the adminis- 
trative unit. The purpose and 
function of an advisory coun- 
cil shall be to serve in an 
advisory capacity to the board 
on matters affecting the 
school or schools for which it 
is appointed." 

It is noted from the above, such 
a member acts only in an advisory 
capacity, and actually has no 
definite duties or specific authority 
as are generally attached to a 
public office. 

It is, therefore, my opinion that 
membership on the advisory coun- 
cil does not constitute a public 
office, and an individual who is 
serving as a public officer can 
accept membership on the advisory 
council. Attorney General, Decem- 
ber 6, 1965. 



Rockingham Board Orders 
$1.4 Million Bond Issue 

The Rockingham County Board 
of Commissioners at its December 
meeting ordered the issuance of 
educational bonds totaling almost 
$1,500,000 and which had previous- 
ly been approved by the voters. 

An issue of $1,250,000 is for the 
construction of Rockingham Com- 
munity College and another issue 
for $140,000 is for the construction 
of a consolidated junior high 
school at Leaksville. Repayment of 
the college bonds will be $50,000 
annually from 1967 through 198C; 
$60,000 in 1981 and 1982; $125,000 
from 1983 through 1985; and a 
final payment of $55,000 in 1986. 

The junior high issue repayment 
calls for $10,000 each year from 
1967 through 1980. 

The industrial education center, 
which operated for several years 
in the tri-cities area, will become 
a part of the community college 
and its needs were included in the 
college budget which also was 
approved. 



Consolidation Suit Docketed 

A Moore County school consoli- 
dation suit was scheduled for 
hearing in that county's January 
17 civil term of Superior Court 
before Judge Robert M. Gambell. 

J. D. Hobbs of Southern Pines 
and Dr. J. C. Grier, Jr., of Pine- 
hurst, on behalf of themselves 
and other taxpayers, are challeng- 
ing the constitutionality of the 
special act passed by the 1965 
General Assembly under which 
voters on October 2 approved mer- 
ger of the Southern Pines and 
Pinehurst city units with the 
Moore County Schools. Defen- 
dants in the suit are the Moore 
County Board of Commissioners, 
the Moore County Board of Elec- 
tions, and T. Wade Bruton, State 
Attorney General. 

Prior to the October election 
Judge Allen Gwyn, in a Wades- 
boro hearing, declined to grant an 
injunction against the election 
and he also declined at that time 
to rule on constitutionality ques- 
tions. 



State Librarian Named 

Philip S. Ogilvie of Tulsa, Okla. 
has been appointed State librarian 
of North Carolina and he assumed 
his duties December 1. He suc- 
ceeds Mrs. Elizabeth Hughie who 
resigned in March. 

Miss Elaine von Oesen, acting 
State Librarian since March, has 
been named assistant State Li- 
brarian. The appointments were 
announced by Thad Stem, Jr., of 
Oxford, chairman of the North 
Carolina State Library board of 
trustees. 

Ogilvie served the Albemarle 
Regional Library in Winton as 
director from July, 1954, through 
June, 1956 when he left this State 
to organize and direct the Coastal 
Plain Regional Library with 
headquarters in Tifton, Ga. He 
returns to North Carolina from 
Tulsa where he has been assistant 
director and chief of the Central 
Library of the Tulsa City-County 
Library System. 

He is a native of Savannah, Ga. 
and received his B. A. degree 
from St. Mary's University, Balti- 
more, Md., and his graduate de- 
gree in library science from the 
Catholic University of American 
Library School. He has taken post- 
graduate work at a number of 
institutions and is active in many 
professional organizations. 



Prospective Teacher Loan 
Applications Available 

About 600 new scholarship loans, 
for $350 per year with a maximum 
of $1,400 for four years' college 
work, will be available for the 
1966-67 school year through the 
Prospective Teachers Scholarship 
Loan Fund. 

The fund was created by the 
1957 General Assembly to provide 
financial assistance to worthy high 
school seniors and college students 
who plan to attend college and 

qualify for a teacher's certificate. 
Applications must be completed 
and returned to the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction before 
March 1, 1966. Applications are 
available upon request through 
Prospective Teachers Scholarship 
Loan, State Department of Public 
Instruction, Raleigh. 



JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



IS 






LOOKING BACK 

In January issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 
Driver education instruction was 
given to 41,909 students by 751 
North Carolina high schools dur- 
ing the school year 1959-60. This 
was 63.8 percent of the estimated 
eligible students in all high 
schools. 

Extension of the school term be- 
yond the present nine months and 
a broader emphasis upon summer 
school programs with State and 
local financial responsibilities are 
the two main recommendations of 
a Study Commission Report. The 
Commission was authorized by 
the 1959 General Assembly to 
study possibilities of a twelve 
months' use of school facilities. 

Ten Years Ago, 1956 
Santford Martin, chairman of 
the State Board of Education, sees 
as the most important action 
taken at the White House Confer- 
ence on Education, November 28- 
December 1, the two to one vote 
in favor of federal aid to educa- 
tion without federal control. 

Percentage of school dropouts 
in North Carolina public schools 
dropped from 5 to 4.4 percent in 
the five year period from 1948-49 
to 1953-54, according to a study 
completed by H. C. West, statistic- 
ian for the State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 

Taylor Dodson, advisor in Phys- 
ical and Health Education for the 
Department of Public Instruction, 
quoted the National Society of 
State Directors of Physical Edu- 
cation as being against highly 
organized competitive athletic 
leagues for children in grades 1-8. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1946 

Thirty-four North Carolina 
schools provide training in diversi- 
fied occupations, it is learned 
from George W. Coggin, State 
Supervisor of Trade and Indus- 
trial Education, State Department 
of Public Instruction. The schools 
are located in 28 towns and cities, 
and all except two are in city 
school administrative units. 



ECC's Cherry Point Center 
Gets Final Board Approval 

A two-year educational center at 
Cherry Point, operated by East 
Carolina College, has been given 
final approval by the State Board 
of Higher Education. 

Preliminary approval was given 
last March for the center, which is 
open to military and civilian stu- 
dents at the Marine Corps Air Sta- 
tion at Cherry Point. Approval was 
contingent on assurances from 
military authorities of the financial 
support of the center and receipt 
of a report from the Southern As- 
sociation of Colleges and Schools 
indicating the center would meet 
Association standards. Dr. Howard 
Boozer, director of the board, said 
assurances of both these contin- 
gencies had been received. 



Retired Schoolman Dies 

Clement G. Credle, 80, retired 
school superintendent, died at his 
home in Oxford December 23 of 
a heart attack. 

Credle had served as superin- 
tendent of Oxford schools from 
1920-51, as superintendent in Tar- 
boro 1954-57, and thereafter he 
served a similar period in Iredell 
County. He was a native of Swan 
Quarter and had taught there and 
in Oriental before going to Ox- 
ford. 

He was buried in Oakdale Ceme- 
tery at Washington, N. C. 



For Women Drivers Only 

Several of this State's technical 
institutes, operated under the 
Community College system, have 
started a course for women who 
wish to know more about the car 
they drive. The course is called 
"Orientation to the Auto — for 
Women." 

Emphasis is placed on what is 
to be found under the hood and 
how to use the knowledge intelli- 
gently. In addition, students cover 
such topics as how to change a 
tire, how to anticipate troubles 
before they happen, and basic 
troubleshooting procedures. 



Instruction Dean Resigns 

Dr. Theodore Wilson, Dean of 
Instruction at Gaston College and 
chairman of the social studies de- 
partment, has resigned to accept 
the position of assistant dean for 
general education and professor 
of general studies at the Com- 
munity and Technical College of 
the University of Toledo, in Tole- 
do, Ohio. 

He will assume his new duties 
in Ohio on March 1. Dr. Wilson 
has been dean at Gaston College 
for two years. 



Land Purchase Made 
by Wilson Tech Institute 

The Wilson County Technical 
Institute has purchased 92.55 
acres of land in Gardners Town- 
ship where a heavy equipment 
operators school will be located. 

A permanent building for stor- 
age and mechanical repairs will 
be built from State funds at the 
site, according to S. DelMastro, 
president of the institute. He said 
the property is being paid for out 
of the institute's capital outpay 
budget. 

Previously, heavy equipment 
operator classes have been held on 
county-owned or leased property. 



New Vocational Chairman 

Paul E. Keicher, formerly as- 
sociated with Mohawk Valley 
Community College in Utica, 
N. Y., has been named chairman 
of the technical-vocational divi- 
sion program at Surry Community 
College. 

Keicher has 14 years of teach- 
ing experience in technology. He 
holds a BS in chemical engineer- 
ing and has done graduate work 
at the Utica branch of Syracuse 
University. At Surry Community 
College he will develop vocational 
and technical programs to meet 
the needs of students as they pre- 
pare themselves for job oppor- 
tunities, according to I. John Kre- 
pick, president of the institution. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 






b 



■$o U, 



Iducational 
Iress 
soc1 ation 

OF 
MERICA 




North Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



K ( 



FEBRUARY 1966 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, NO. 6 




State Education Agency W 
In ESEA Projects Designed 

North Carolina is participating 
in four national and/or regional 
projects aimed at improving the 
services of state education agencies 
and funded under Section 505, Title 
V, of the Elementary and Second- 
ary Education Act. 

Georgia, Alabama, Florida, South 
Carolina, and Tennessee are work- 
ing with this State in a curriculum 
development study. During the 
early stages of the project each 
state's education agency will at- 
tempt to facilitate the growth and 
development of its staff members 
— helping them to become increas- 
ingly able to assist school personnel 
in the development of curricula 
and instructional leadership. Later, 
the project will work with selected 
local school systems in developing 
programs and materials leading to 
desirable curriculum change and 
overall improvement of education- 
al programs. Project results in 
each of the cooperating states will 
be shared with the other states 
involved. Through this sharing of 
ideas and means, it is hoped that 
all the states will be in a position 
to improve many aspects of the 
educational programs available to 
their youth. 

International Scope 

North Carolina is cooperating 
with Texas, Alabama, Tennessee, 
and Virginia in a project designed 
to introduce the international di- 
mension into the work of the state 
education agency. Curricular ma- 
terials will be reviewed and means 
developed for building aspects of 
international education into in- 
structional plans. Certification re- 
quirements will be reviewed and 
recommendations developed to rec- 
ognize overseas experiences as a 
part of teacher education. Activi- 
ties of the project will be related 
to Federal agencies interested in 
international education — the Peace 



ill Join Other States 
to Improve Services 

Corps, the Office of Overseas 
Schools of the United States De- 
partment of State, the Department 
of Defense, etc. 

Through the coordination of activ- 
ities of non-governmental groups 
working in international education, 
the project will promote and en- 
hance within each state such activi- 
ties as teacher exchange programs, 
reciprocal scholarships with Amer- 
ican-sponsored overseas institu- 
tions, development of lists of edu- 
cational consultants available for 
overseas assignments, exploration 
of sabbatical programs, coordina- 
tion with local directors who pres- 
ently have overseas projects, ex- 
ploration of the use of mass 
educational media, and focus atten- 
tion of teacher education programs 
on the international dimension. 
For the Gifted 

California, Florida, George, Illi- 
nois, Minnesota, New York, North 
Carolina, Ohio, and Washington 
will cooperate in a project con- 
cerned with education for gifted, 
or exceptionally talented, children. 
The project will start with a series 
of conferences between state sup- 
ervisors of current programs in the 
various states in order to compare 
experiences in curriculum, person- 
nel, and organizational patterns. 

In a national project designed to 
improve communications and public 
information programs of the state 
educational agencies, North Caro- 
lina will participate on a regional 
level with Indiana, Ohio, Maryland, 
Delaware, District of Columbia, 
Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and 
West Virginia. The project will get 
under way with a national institute 
and seminar on public information 
next summer and continue with 
regional training seminars and the 
dissemination of guides and aids 
developed through various research 
programs. 



New GED Tests Developed 
For Visually Handicapped 

An additional service is now 
available in the high school equiva- 
lency program to adults in North 
Carolina who are blind or visually 
handicapped. 

The Commission on Accredita- 
tion has made available two special 
editions of the General Education 
Development Tests (GED) which 
will be administered without cost 
to such persons who are candi- 
dates for the high school equiva- 
lency certificate. Cornelius Turner, 
director of the commission from 
Washington, D. C, was at the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
to confer about these new GED 
tests on January 19. He said large- 
type tests for the visually handi- 
capped and a magnetic tape test, 
along with a special scoring device, 
for the blind are now available. 
Also, an edition of the tests in 
braille is currently being prepared 
and will be available later, he said. 

All of the tests in this phase of 
the program will be administered 
in Raleigh at no cost to the appli- 
cant, other than travel and sub- 
sistence. Arrangements have been 
made with the Governor Morehead 
School (formerly the State School 
for the Blind) to do this. Eligibil- 
ity requirements remain the same 
as for other applicants : at least 19 

(Continued on Page U) 



Already Approved 

By January 24 the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction had 
approved 44 projects, submitted 
by 43 school units, for Title I 
projects in North Carolina. Ap- 
propriations from funds made 
available through the Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Education 
Act amounted to $12,202,129.23. 



£4^esUtiie44de,nt Gainali ScufA, . . . 

(Excerpts from address to Rotary Club, Charlotte, January 18, 1966) 

. . . Education has become our second largest industry — second only to national 
defense. . . . When we come into an era of peace, and we pray such is not too 
distant, education might well become this nation's largest industry. ... In 1965-66 
we are spending for education approximately $42 billion. . . . We are told that more 
than 54 million persons in this country — almost 30 percent of our people — are enrolled 
in our schools and colleges. . . . Nearly 2 1 4 million persons are directly employed 
as teachers. Additional millions of workers earn their living from education — in sales, 
construction, maintenance, and related industries. . . . 

For nearly two centuries education remained primarily a state and local task. . . . 
Here in North Carolina when the first public school system was established in 1839, 
the first school law stipulated that if a local district, six miles square in area, would 
provide $20 a year and a building the State would supply $40 a year and with the 
total sum of $60 the people in the district could have within a given year possibly 
all the education they wanted. The Federal Government at that time, and for many 
years thereafter, was completely silent on the subject of education ... its appropri- 
ations later for education were relatively meager. . . . 

With the launching of the first sputnik by the Russians in 1958, however, the 
decision was made by our Congress that if this Nation is to be kept strong and 
competitive in world affairs the Federal Government must move more forcefully into 
the field of education and "federalize" certain subject matter fields as a means of 
shoring up our lines of defense against any and all onslaughts from without. . . . Over 
the last few years Federal appropriations have increased 20-fold — to approximately 
$3 Vi billion last year. Within the current fiscal year Federal expenditures for edu- 
cation will exceed $8.5 billion. . . . 

To be equated with such defense subjects as science and mathematics, and history 
and English, is the program to help eradicate some of the poverty within the midst 
of our affluent society and some of the social ills which poverty breeds. ... In the 
pursuit of this part of the Great Society's program the Federal Government has 
estimated that one out of every four children in North Carolina 5-17 years of age 
is economically disadvantaged and presumably educationally deprived as the result 
of his economic status. 

To be equated with the defense subjects also is the integration of pupils and 
faculty in the schools as a condition for receiving Federal funds, which already are 
approaching $90 million a year in North Carolina. . . . 

Exactly how many educational programs the Federal Government is financing at 
oil levels is almost beyond the knowledge of any person. ... A new government 
publication, "Catalogue of Federal Programs for Individuals and Community Improve- 
ment . . .," lists more than 700 types of Federal aids, loans, grants, and handouts, 
many of which are educational. . . . 

With the acceleration of Federal involvement in education, we have witnessed a 
confusing array of isolated and unrelated Federally-supported educational programs 
with varying and sometimes strange administrative parentage. . . . We feel the 
imminence of National persuasion in areas such as curriculum, testing, and stan- 
dards. . . . 

If we continue to permit voids in our educational structure through inertia or through 
lack of both financial and moral support at local and State levels, it would appear 
only reasonable to assume that the Federal Government is going to move in and 
involve itself in increasing manner in all educational affairs. 

If through default and indifference and possible desire we call more and more 
upon the Federal Government for support and direction in the operation of our 
schools and colleges, I think we can expect those outcomes which accompany massive 
evaluation schemes, national testing norms, national curricula, and other designs 
tending toward conformity. When conformity and massiveness come upon us, educa- 
tion will become more and more an impersonal matter. When education becomes 
impersonal we know that the individual will be overpowered and submerged and 
when the individual and his interests are submerged, we shall have something quite 
foreign to a program of qualitative education for which we shall be spending but 
which will be denied us because we will have decreed it that way. . . . 

Finally, if everybody is to become involved in the educational process, there must 
be a closer tie between educators and non-educators. At stake in this educational 
picture is the destiny of all of us. At stake is our security as a Nation. Nobody has 
more at stake than people such as you. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

CHARLES F. CARROLL J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

State Supt. of Public Instruction V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

"Those who can, do; those who 
can't, teach." What is more they 
are the only available teachers, be- 
cause those who "can" are mostly 
quite incapable of teaching, even if 
they had time for it. — G. Bernard 
Shaw 



The saddest of all obituaries 
might well be: "His hidden talents 
were never discovered." The intense 
concern of some parents for their 
"gifted" children probably stems 
from a feeling of their own latent 
but underdeveloped talents. And in 
this, the wealthiest of all lands, 
some children and youth will rarely 
if ever be nurtured in the rich and 
provocative presence of a gifted 
teacher. Many teachers, too, will 
remain mediocre, their potential 
but hidden talents undiscovered or 
under developed. — Edgar Dale 



It doesn't matter how much 
money you have everyone has to 
buy wisdom on the installment 
plan. — Grit 



At what age does a youngster 
really determine his future career? 
An outstanding farm scientist tells 
me he was 9 when he decided to 
become a chemist. A toy chemistry 
set aroused his interest. A sur- 
vey among ornithologists showed 
that nearly all noted figures in 
this field were fascinated by bird 
studies at from 9 to 12 ... I have 
an idea many of the more able 
young people know what they 
want to do even before they get 
to high school. 

— Wheeler McMillen 



Vol. XXX, No. 6 



February, 1966 



You cannot discover a youngster 
with fire in him unless the dis- 
covery is made by a teacher with 
fire in him. There are no ways 
of discovering promise and talent 
in youngsters simply by tests. 
Tests can tell you about achieve- 
ment and tests might conceivably 
tell you about some kind of poten- 
tial; but after you have taken 
the whole battery of diagnostic 
tests there remains, nevertheless, 
the indispensable element. Carlyle 
used to say: "The big question 
about any man is — have you a 
fire in your belly?" — Max Lerner 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Mat jjubt 2>edAe*t 

H. L. Mencken's characterization 
of the South as "the Sahara of the 
beaux arts" has been rendered 
archaic by numerous cultural de- 
velopments in recent years, but 
there is still unmistakable evidence 
in many areas of a lack of real 
and concerted interest in promot- 
ing education in the fine arts. 

This lack of interest is some- 
times expressed in an analogy 
which fails to stand up under crit- 
ical examination : that the educa- 
tional diet consists of certain 
staple foods — the three Rs, sci- 
ence, the social studies, vocational 
training, etc. — while the cultural 
subjects — fine arts, foreign lan- 
guages, etc. — are dessert items, 
dispensable luxuries too rich for 
most people's blood and likely to 
be fattening if not sharply re- 
stricted. 

Limited View 

Whatever plausibility there may 
be in this analogy is a symptom of 
limited acquaintance with the fine 
arts and the unreflective suspicion 
that lively interest in these areas 
of human experience is likely to 
be associated with snobbery. 

Perhaps the prevalent view is 
that education in the fine arts 
should be restricted to the few who 
exhibit exceptional interest and 
talent in those directions, with 
a minimal exposure to selected 
innocuous works of art for the 
many, who seem quite indifferent. 
This reflects a rather dismal and 
limited view of the potentialities 
of the many. 

It is controverted by the prac- 
tically unanimous judgment of 
those who have been so fortunate 
and motivated as to acquire a 
broad acquaintance with human 
cultures and the astonishingly di- 
verse and fascinating modes of 
artistic expression which have been 
developed in interaction with other 
phases of human life. 

Education in these areas is not 
"dessert" but a most important in- 
gredient in developing every stu- 
dent's potential for richer appre- 
ciation of the vast heritage of 
culture, the enhancement of sensi- 
bility, and the broadening of 
experience through greater under- 



standing of the symbolic expres- 
sions of many significant aspects 
of human experience not expres- 
sible in other modes of communi- 
cation. 

Special Competence 

Education in the fine arts re- 
quires more than an earnest desire 
on the part of teachers who lack 
specific training in these areas to 
do more for their students. It re- 
quires teachers of fine sensibility, 
skilled in the techniques and dis- 
ciplines which make possible the 
effective presentation of great art 
and the encouragement of individ- 
ual creative expression on the part 
of each student. This sort of com- 
petence cannot be acquired in brief 
workshops, however helpful these 
may be in pointing directions. 

North Carolinians can point with 
pride to many recent developments 
in fine arts education — the out- 
standing collections and programs 
of the State Art Museum and the 
Mint Museum, the opportunities 
for gifted students afforded by the 
Governor's School and the North 
Carolina School of the Arts, the 
improvement of art and music pro- 
grams in a number of high schools, 
and the circulating exhibits of fine 
works of art in the institutions 
composing the Community College 
system. 

Still Far to Go 

The plain fact remains that in 
most public schools, the music and 
art programs are in effect "poor 
stepchildren" which fall far short 
of meeting minimum guidelines. To 
be sure, there is evidence of earnest 
desire on the part of many teachers 
and administrators to do some- 
thing better along these lines. But 
there is a large gap between good 
intentions and effective instruc- 
tional programs. 

There are hopeful indications 
that the attitude toward fine arts 
education is changing, as the im- 
pact of better planned and better 
staffed arts programs is being felt. 
Best-informed appraisals suggest, 
however, that there is still a long 
way to go to provide the type of 
instruction which will demonstrate 
that the fine arts are not just 
dessert. 



One of the least heralded yet 
most promising phases of the cur- 
rent massive effort to improve 
educational opportunities for the 
disadvantaged and the under- 
achieving can hardly be called an 
innovation, since it is the revival 
of a practice as ancient as any 
employed in education — namely, 
tutoring. 

No statistics are available to 
indicate how widespread is the 
use of this well-proven technique, 
and doubtless it will be difficult 
to measure the effectiveness of a 
way of teaching that is most suc- 
cessful when most individualized. 
But scattered reports indicate 
that it is being rather widely em- 
ployed and proving its worth. 

So far, there are no signs of 
attempts to formalize the tutoring 
movement, to set up standards and 
guidelines, or to assign it a snappy 
designation in capital letters. This 
administrative oversight apparent- 
ly has not hampered the acceptance 
or success of the endeavor. Indeed, 
it might be suspected that the in- 
stitutional touch would stifle the 
spontaneous interchange that is 
the distinctive feature of the tu- 
torial relationship. 

Who are the tutors? Many of 
them are college students, working 
with community action projects or 
in a special tutoring corps spon- 
sored by the Learning Institute 
of North Carolina in cooperation 
with the North Carolina Fund; 
others are VISTA volunteers; 
others are teachers or counselors 
engaged in various State and Fed- 
erally supported special programs; 
others, simply volunteers, ranging 
from teenagers to retired persons, 
in projects sponsored by church 
groups and other organizations. 

Success in tutoring depends on 
noncompetition — the tutorial ap- 
proach being conceived as supple- 
mentary to other modes of instruc- 
tion, and the student's attention 
being directed to his own needs 
and achievements rather than be- 
ing compared to others. This mod- 
est educative practice once again 
is claiming its place. 



FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 






Approved Program Approach Producing Results 
In Better Teacher Education, Freeman Says 



The approved program approach 
to teacher education and certifica- 
tion is resulting in better quality 
teachers for North Carolina's 
public schools, according to Dr. J. 
P. Freeman, director of the Divi- 
sion of Professional Services for 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

The program was accepted in 
principal by the State Board of 
Education in January of 1961. 
Subsequently, committees and sub- 
committees worked under the gen- 
eral direction of Dr. Freeman's 
division and the State Advisory 
Council on Teacher Education and 
Professional Standards to prepare 
standards and guidelines to imple- 
ment the new program. On Septem- 
ber 6, 1962, the standards and 
guidelines were adopted by the 
State Board of Education. 

Cites Exam Scores 

North Carolina's average Na- 
tional Teacher Examination scores 
have risen from 545 in 1963 to 576 
in 1965 and Dr. Freeman believes 
the approved program deserves a 
large part of the credit for this 
increase. He said that most col- 
leges in the State have established 
definite procedures and criteria for 
admission to teacher education 
programs. The national NTE aver- 
age for 1965 was 603. 

Thirty-three institutions of high- 
er learning in North Carolina are 
eligible for visitation and evalua- 
tion by the 24-member study com- 
mittee charged with the duty of 
enforcing the standards set for 
colleges in the State preparing 
teachers. September 1, 1966 is the 
deadline for compliance by these 
colleges. 

Institutions Visited 

By January 1, a total of 27 
institutions had been visited and 
the State Board of Education had 
taken action on 22. Visitation Com- 
mittee reports on the other five are 
now being edited, checked by the 
colleges involved, and prepared for 
the State Evaluation Committee. 
The remaining six institutions have 
submitted preliminary applications 
and visitations are scheduled for 
March and April of 1966. 



Colleges approved in 1963 and 
1964 are now submitting teacher's 
applications for their graduates 
under their approved programs. 
Over 2,000 certificates were issued 
to 1965 college graduates who 
qualified for certification under 
their institution's approved pro- 
gram, Dr. Freeman said. 
Major Effects 

Taking stock of accomplishments 
to date under the "approved pro- 
gram approach to teacher educa- 
tion," Dr. Freeman said that a 
major one is the involvement of 
collegiate academic and profession- 
al educational personnel (over 
1,000 persons) in the development 
of State standards and of guide- 
lines for the institutions and pro- 
grams preparing teachers. Also, 
the involvement of academic and 
professional personnel from col- 
lege campuses in visitations on 
other college campuses has proved 
to be a good in-service education 
program for college personnel. 

Being required to recommend 
and stand behind their graduates 
has caused many institutions to 
review their policies on completion 
of a teacher education program. 
Stricter policies have resulted. 
Curriculum laboratories, or mate- 
rials centers, have been established 
and/or improved. 

Improved Resources 

Library resources for teacher 
education have been improved and 
there is increased availability and 
usage of audiovisual aids. There is 
better supervision of student teach- 
ers by supervising teachers and 
college supervisors. "No longer 
does one college supervisor attempt 
to supervise 70 or 80 students 
while also teaching a full load," he 
noted. And, there has been at least 
partial elimination of obvious fac- 
ulty overloads in teaching and 
administrative duties for profes- 
sional personnel. 

The program has resulted in col- 
lege administrations recognizing 
that teacher education is an inte- 
gral part of the institution's 
function — not a side activity. "More 
and more, teacher education is be- 
ing accepted as an institution-wide 
function," Dr. Freeman explained. 



New GED Tests . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
years of age and a bona fide resi- 
dent of the State. 

Letters explaining the procedure 
for taking the tests have been 
mailed by the State Department of 
Public Instruction to all school 
superintendents and to members 
and supervisory staff of the North 
Carolina Commission for the Blind. 
An applicant makes requests to 
take the tests through the super- 
intendent of schools in his home 
town. The superintendent endorses 
the application; specifies whether 
large-type, tape, or braille tests are 
desired; and then transmits the 
application to: "Psychologist, Gov- 
ernor Morehead School, Raleigh, 
N. C." The psychologist will advise 
the applicant and make an appoint- 
ment for him to be tested in 
Raleigh. 

"The whole program treats 
teacher education as being dynamic 
rather than static, thus providing 
for revision of programs as further 
study, experience, and experiment- 
ation might indicate," he conclud- 
ed. 

By January, six institutions had 
received a full five year approval 
for all programs requested. Eight 
had received a full five year ap- 
proval for most of their programs 
and provisional three year approval 
for others. Four had received pro- 
visional three year approval for all 
programs requested. 

One college's program was pro- 
visionally approved for three years 
and after recommended improve- 
ments were made, at the end of the 
first year, a review resulted in the 
regular five year approval in most 
areas. Another's program was given 
a five year approval with one area 
of the program being denied. After 
the first year, when recommended 
improvements had been made, the 
denied program also received ap- 
proval. 

One institution received a five 
year approval for its undergrad- 
uate programs and deferral for its 
graduate programs. Another insti- 
tution's approval was deferred for 
one year and subsequently approved 
provisionally for three years on all 
programs requested. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Foreign Language Educators Launch Effort 
Toward Better Articulation of Programs 



An all-out effort to coordinate 
modern foreign language instruc- 
tion in North Carolina from 
elementary school through college 
was launched with a conference of 
educators held Dec. 14 at State 
Department of Public Instruction 
headquarters in Raleigh. 

Conference participants included 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
members of the Department's Mod- 
ern Foreign Languages supervisory- 
staff, language teachers and super- 
visors, school superintendents, and 
college representatives. 

Mrs. Tora Ladu, the State 
agency's supervisor of Modern 
Foreign Languages, explained that 
the concern about improving co- 
ordination was the result of the 
"expanding sequence of foreign 
languages in the schools," due in 
large part to Federal financial as- 
sistance for these programs under 
the National Defense Education 
Act. 

Changing Patterns 

The two-year pattern of foreign 
language study which prevailed in 
North Carolina's public schools is 
giving way to sequences of three, 
four, and six years, she noted. 
While fewer than 50 schools of- 
fered a third year of a modern 
foreign language in 1959, the num- 
ber increased to about 300 in the 
1964-65 school year. Still others 
have added a third year since then. 
Several of the larger school sys- 
tems now provide a six-year se- 
quence, a few an eight or nine year 
sequence, and one school system 
has just inaugurated a foreign lan- 
guage program in grades 1-12. 

Enrollment in high school for- 
eign language programs has in- 
creased 112 percent since 1959, or 
81 percent more than the increase 
in total high school enrollment for 
the State. 

Closer Liaison 

This rapid change in the struc- 
ture of courses and the increasing 
emphasis on the audiolingual ap- 
proach and the use of language 
laboratories have brought the need 
for closer liaison between the pub- 



lic schools and the colleges, she 
observed. 

In view of these changes, "high 
schools need to know what the col- 
leges expect of their students and 
colleges want to know how to train 
teachers for the high schools," she 
said. 

Problem Reviewed 

Discussion at the meeting ranged 
over a variety of topics, Mrs. Ladu 
said, among them the following: 

• Apparent lack of misunder- 
standing on the part of some high 
school teachers as to the proper use 
of the language laboratory, as in- 
dicated by the inability of the 
students to manipulate the lan- 
guage beyond the stock phrases 
and patterns practiced in the lab. 

• Need to explore means to en- 
courage teachers to avail them- 
selves of opportunities to improve 
their teaching competencies — schol- 
arships, institutes, and study 
abroad. 

• Lack of adequate methods 
courses taught by faculty members 
experienced in the audiolingual ap- 
proach in the teacher preparation 
programs of colleges and universi- 
ties. 

• Suggestions for improving the 
articulation of courses, particularly 
in view of indications by college 
representatives that thorough foun- 
dation in language skills in the 
advanced high school classes would 
be preferable to courses in litera- 
ture, as a groundwork for college 
courses. 

• Consideration by colleges of 
the possibility of offering selected 
courses in various disciplines 
taught in foreign languages, since 
not all student will wish to pursue 
literary studies in college. 

• Exploration of the need for 
different foreign language courses 
in secondary schools for college 
bound students and those for whom 
the high school instruction will be 
terminal. 

• Need to apprise guidance 
counselors and others advising stu- 
dents in secondary schools of the 
desirability of advising students to 
aim at acquiring real competence 



Building Program Under Way 
For Cape Fear Institute 

Groundbreaking ceremonies for 
new downtown facilities of the 
Cape Fear Technical Institute at 
Wilmington, to cost $1,075,000, 
were held on December 17. 

More than 200 state and local 
officials, educators, industrialists, 
businessmen and CFTI students 
gathered at the waterfront site 
where Rep. Alton Lennon and Fred 
Galehouse, chairman of the CFTI 
board of trustees, lifted the first 
tufts of dirt. 

In outlining the history of the 
CFTI, Rep. Lennon said that in 
the 1959-60 school year "we started 
here in the Wilmington area an In- 
dustrial Education Center, one of 
the first in all North Carolina." In 
1964 the educational center became 
a technical institute. 

"Six years ago the center here 
had 750 students and today it has 
nearly 5,400 students," Rep. Len- 
non said. "When this facility has 
been completed the student enroll- 
ment is expected to climb to around 
8,000 students and from then on, 
who knows where it will sky- 
rocket," 

M. J. McLeod, president of the 
CFTI, said the groundbreaking 
ceremonies marked the culmination 
of a two year effort which was the 
result of "complete cooperation 
between the local community, De- 
partment of Community Colleges, 
and the State Board of Education." 
He added that the institute will 
move into the new facilities within 
one year. 

Although the CFTI primarily 
serves New Hanover, Pender, and 
Brunswick counties, many students 
come from other Southeastern 
counties to enroll in the full-time 
and part-time courses. 

in foreign languages, through an 
extended course of study, rather 
than simply meeting college en- 
trance requirements. 

• Lack of adequately trained 
foreign language teachers at the 
elementary level, a major deterrent 
to the effectiveness and expansion 
of the elementary foreign language 
program. 



FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Tar Heel Vocational Rehabilitation Program 
Sets Records in Serving Needs of Disabled 



North Carolina's Vocational Re- 
habilitation program, long regard- 
ed by authorities in the field as 
one of the most outstanding state 
programs in the nation, set a new 
record during the past fiscal year, 
ranking third among the states in 
the number of disabled citizens 
rehabilitated through its services. 

A total of 8,545 men and women 
with physical or mental disabili- 
ties, 534 blind persons, entered 
some form of useful employment 
during 1964-65 as a result of the 
activities of the Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, a branch of 
the State Department of Public In- 
struction, and the State Commis- 
sion for the Blind. 

Pennsylvania led the states with 
a total of 12,794 persons rehabili- 
tated, and New York ranked 
second, with 9,067 rehabilitations. 
Service Lauded 

Federal and State officials joined 
in expressing congratulations and 
appreciation for this notable record 
of service. In a telegram to Robert 
A. Lassiter, director of the Divi- 
sion, Mary E. Switzer, U. S. Com- 
missioner of Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, noted that not only did North 
Carolina rank third in the total 
number of rehabilitations, but also 
third in the number of rehabili- 
tants per 100,000 population— 176, 
as compared with the national 
average of 70. 

Governor Dan K. Moore and Dr. 
Charles F. Carroll, State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction, each 
conveyed their appreciation for the 
dedicated work of the Vocational 
Rehabilitation staff, and Lt. Gov. 
Robert W. Scott lauded their 
achievement in an address to mem- 
bers of the N. C. Rehabilitation 
Association at their 10th annual 
conference. 

Benefits Cited 

"It is you people who dispel the 
image of a cold and impersonal 
State government," he told the 
group. As a measure of the pro- 
gram's effectiveness, he cited the 
fact that when the more than 8,000 
handicapped people were accepted 
into the program, "their total 



weekly wages amounted to $47,854. 
But when their cases were closed, 
and they had renewed confidence in 
their ability and were working, 
their total weekly salaries had 
jumped to $222,651, an increase of 
365 percent." 

In Human Terms 

An idea of the impact in human 
terms of the services provided 
through the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation can be gained from 
the "Success Stories" featured in 
its remarkable bimonthly magazine, 
Reach. Each of these stories re- 
counts the experiences of a person 
who has been assisted in adjusting 
to a disability and finding a suit- 
able type of work. Many of them 
reflect long and arduous struggles 
to come to grips with severe dis- 
abilities, sometimes extending over 
many years. 

Areas of Service 

Principal areas of service pro- 
vided by the Division are counsel- 
ing and guidance; medical diag- 
nosis and treatment; assistance in 
obtaining proper artificial appli- 
ances and devices such as wheel 
chairs, artifical limbs, hearing 
aids; training and obtaining tools 
and equipment for suitable types 
of employment; room, board, and 
transportation arrangements essen- 
tial to the individual's rehabilita- 
tion program; and job placement 
and follow-up. 

Services are tailored to the 
specific needs of each individual, 
with the objective of placement in 
a suitable type of employment so 
he may become "self supporting 
and financially independent to the 
fullest degree possible," Lassiter 
explained. A wide variety of con- 
sultants and facilities may be in- 
volved in the individual's program. 

Various approaches also are em- 
ployed in job placement, but the 
rehabilitation counselor maintains 
close contact with the client and 
the employer until he is reasonably 
sure that both are satisfied and 
that placement is effective. "Only 
then is the case marked closed— 
rehabilitated," Lassiter said. 



Women Attend Traffic Meet, 
Applaud Driver Ed Program 

Over 300 club women from 
throughout the State gathered in 
Memorial Auditorium in Raleigh 
on January 14 for the Third 
Women's Traffic Safety Seminar 
and heard Gov. Dan K. Moore de- 
clare that "community effort in 
traffic safety has become one of 
the chief objectives of this admin- 
istration." 

"We are now entering the ad- 
ministrative phase of our pro- 
gram," he said, "and this phase is 
not easy to create because there 
are no easily recognizable needs to 
capture and excite the minds of the 
public." He cited two main admin- 
istrative objectives: to keep the 
citizen-support groups informed 
and to redirect the citizen-support 
from the legislative level to the 
local level. 

Robert P. Holding, Jr., president 
of the North Carolina Traffic Safe- 
ty Council, discussed community 
organization for traffic safety and 
thanked the club women present 
for their support in securing the 
safety legislation passed by the last 
General Assembly. Robert Parker, 
of the Department of Motor Ve- 
hicles, explained the new motor 
vehicles safety inspection law. 

The audience of women cheered 
when John C. Noe, supervisor of 
Driver and Safety Education for 
the Department of Public Instruc- 
tion, reported on expansions being 
made in public school driver edu- 
cation programs since the passage 
of a law requiring all persons 
under 18 years to have a driver 
education course before securing a 
license. By September 1, he said, 
reports indicated all local school 
administrative units were working 
toward adaptation of their driver 
education programs for operation 
on a 12-month basis. During the 
1965-66 year, he said, a total of 
117,000 persons under 18 years of 
age will complete at least 30 hours 
of classroom instruction plus six 
hours of car instruction. During 
the 1964-65 year, enrollment in the 
30-6 programs totaled 70,940. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Over 15,000 Teachers Improve Qualifications 
Through In-Service Education Program in '65 



The American medical profes- 
sion recently reported that if we 
have had a prescription filled with- 
in the last 12 months, the chances 
are 8 in 10 that our physician pre- 
scribed a drug he had not heard 
about when he finished his intern- 
ship and set up his practice. The 
statement was made to point up 
the necessity of doctors' keeping 
abreast of new dveelopments — and 
the same is true of the entire teach- 
ing profession. 

Teaching methods and curricu- 
lum content are changing with such 
rapidity today that even previously 
well-trained teachers find they 
must "go back to school" to keep 
apace. To help them, the 1961 
General Assembly provided for In- 
Service Education under the super- 
vision of the State Department of 
Public Instruction's Division of 
Professional Services. The pro- 
gram is behind such headlines as 
two taken from recent issues of 
daily newspapers in North Caro- 
lina — "90 County Elementary 
Teachers Complete Life Science 
Class," and "Modern Math Work- 
shop for Teachers Scheduled." 

Based on regulations and pro- 
cedures adopted by the State Board 
of Education, the program provides 
special in-service courses organized 
by local school administrative 
units; summer and area institute 
courses conducted by institutions 
of higher learning through arrange- 
ments with the Division of Pro- 
fessional Services; and television 
courses offered by the State De- 
partment through the educational 
television network. 

Participation Doubles 

In a recent report on in-service 
education activities during the 
1964-65 school year, Dr. James Val- 
same, supervisor of In-Service 
Education, revealed that 15,339 of 
the State's public school teachers 
were enrolled in one or more phases 
of the program. 

This is more than double the 
number of teachers participating 
in the program during the 1963-64 
school year. A total of 7,291 en- 
rolled in some phase of the in- 
service program during 1963-64. 



School units participating in one 
or more phases of the program in- 
creased by 18 last year — from 136 
in 1963-64 to 154 during 1964-65. 
Types of Courses 

Last year 4,361 teachers enrolled 
in 28 local administration unit in- 
service classes. Eighteen colleges 
provided 73 instructors who taught 
110 of these local classes. 

A total of 989 teachers last year 
completed summer and area insti- 
tute programs conducted in co- 
operation with 20 colleges. During 
1963-64 only 215 teachers partici- 
pated in summer and area institute 
programs at six colleges. 

The report reveals that of the 
15,339 teachers enrolled in some 
phase of the in-service program, 
a total of 12,920 took mathematics 
courses. Social studies were second 
in enrollment, followed by science, 
English, art, music, foreign lan- 
guage, and library science, in that 
order. 

There were 9,898 elementary 
teachers enrolled in an in-service 
course in mathematics offered via 
film and television. The test results 
of these teachers compared favor- 
ably with test results of partici- 
pating teachers in several north- 
eastern states. North Carolina's 
mean scores were higher on four 
of five tests. 

New TV Classes 

Valsame said the television 
phase of the in-service program, 
authorized by the State Board of 
Education on February 6, 1964, has 
been the most successful thus far 
attempted. The series consisted of 
15 lessons of 30 minutes each 
which were aimed at bridging the 
gap between knowledge of tradi- 
tional and modern mathematics 
among elementary teachers. 

Local administrative units formed 
classes of 15 to 40 teachers, pro- 
vided a meeting place with tele- 
vision receiver, and provided a 
coordinator with a background in 
mathematics for each class. Film 
was provided for schools located 
outside the education television 
network's viewing area. 

Experience obtained in this first 
effort, Valsame added, has made it 



possible to improve the television 
and film in-service program during 
the current year. 

In-Service Education is an in- 
expensive way for teachers to im- 
prove their knowledge and also to 
earn credit toward certificate re- 
newal, Valsame pointed out. The 
average cost per credit, or semester 
hour completed, last year was 
$10.06 for local administrative unit 
in-service classes; $13.36 for a 
summer or area institute class; 
and $5.52 for a television or film 
class. 

Demand Grows 

New certificate renewal require- 
ments stipulate that teachers must 
earn some credits every five years. 
They can no longer depend upon 
teaching experience only for re- 
newals. Consequently, the demand 
for in-service programs is expected 
to continue to increase. It is 
especially valuable when a new 
textbook adoption is made in a 
subject area which has undergone 
considerable change — -such as the 
new mathematics. Valsame also 
sees a need to place greater em- 
phasis on summer and area insti- 
tute programs in order to provide 
more specialized courses for teach- 
ers which cannot be offered off 
campus. 

Needs Outlined 

"And there is a need to assist 
many of our teachers in grades 
seven and eight to become properly 
prepared for teaching in these 
grades," he said. At the present 
time a majority of these teachers 
are certified in only one or two 
high school subject areas. They 
are not prepared to teach many of 
the subjects they are being re- 
quired to teach in these grades. 
He suggests that scholarships be 
offered to encouraged these teach- 
ers to take courses needed to meet 
the Class A requirements for 
teaching in the elementary school. 

Valsame also pointed to the 
large number of librarian positions 
created in recent years and for 
which there are not enough trained 
persons available. In addition, he 
cites a need to have special in- 
service programs in the teaching 
of reading, pointing out that suc- 
cess in learning in all subjects de- 
pends upon the ability to read. 



FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 







SO 
SO 
ON 



>- 
< 

D 

CO 

m 

y. 



< 

O 
O 

a. 



li- 
as 

o 



c 2 

3 S t» 

s Sffi 

m w *fi 

~3 93 4 

e •** 

0) 



£ ° 

4 is 

be 

■ a 






■S « « 

Si* 1 

3 nh 3 

CO • 

.2.2 be 

o 2 

O ft 



4 s 
be 43 

« > 
3 s- 



I* 

* bo 
—-.5 
a 'S 

W 3 



Sh 

3 01 

£ -B 
u 

3 T3 

o 4 

.5 6 

-*j ■** 

4) CO 

M 

*J CO 

2 c 

3 o 



si- 

<■> ° 4 

a -b S 

« -9 



01 o> 
> be 
03 4 

MS 

£ 8 



v 



V .£ < 
o ' 

•m en w 

o 4 



« TS 



.» o 
bO"** 



S o> 

•ii XJ 

fll 3 

03 3 
Ol 

5 s 

*s -B 



Oi 



•a S 43 



3 .a 
o -« 

U CO 



B *»■» 

a to 

E ^ -rH 

ft'S s 

O fi jg 



e 
c. 
& 

3 
03 W 



3 



01 

j= .a 

05 3 

h (3 



e 13 

3 4 

3 4 

b 3 

be -3 
O ft 
Sh 
ft • 

to 
s- 3 
o> o 

«H — < 

3 s 

S.-S 
>■< *; 

h-i CO 



CH 


T3 


C 


3 


-c 


3 


"1 




4 


3 


9) 


O 


3 


-4— 




CO 




4 


CO 


3 


4> Tl 


Ol 


01 


-*— 




7, 


«W 


3 


o 


- 


93 




-3 


H-» 


h 


o 


3 




O 


CO hC 


T) 




n 


cd 
u 



X X 



O — * O 

Oi • •— i 

■m e s 3 

cd g o w 

CC -S .2 — 

cd ^ 

J3.5 2 ° 

* T3 Q 

*• S ca S 

M 3 In 3 

cd M 3 3 

■3 — 4" 

u ffi be cd 



.5 © 

£-*! 
.3 U 
cd co 

+- ^CJ 

3 3 
.2 3 
3 ft 



t£ 



be a 



■B ii 
W S 



-3 ^ 
3 W 

C C55 
0> 

PQ 3 



c 


3 




4 


a 


C 


cc 




<4« 


4 




X 


4 


•*-i 


-3 


3 



4 3 .S _ 

^'53 b g 

^3^4 

5 ■ £ 

■a 35 

s 2 a 4 

.2 mse 

■S o 4 H 
w b cd 

u ft <M 



C3 
O 4 

"-S S 

S 2 

3 C 



c 
u -3 

5 4 



•i-c CD 

co a 

3 3 

O co 

-3 X 
3 4 
® *P 

s ? 

© CM 

0) CJ5 

h i— i 



ft 3 "3 

be •- c 

•S 2 s 

5 g - 



co 

3 C5 

ft 

4 rj 

co X s 

•° "S ii 

2 °« 

2 -fi -2 
co <5 n 

co i© 33 



93 ■ 

3 c 

© * 



"-S.2 

CO -w 

3 3 

N- 1 4 

3 

Cd« 
4 



© „ 



3 3 

4 £ 

4 CO 

3 



a 3 

T3 k. 

T3 

B 2 
4 g 

ft-* 
© w 

W CO 

2 

cd eo 

2 «g 

a. 05 

4 



be 4 

I? 

4 4 

*^ 

CO S 

.2 S 

3 S 

.a 4 

CO 4 

3 X 



DO 
4 . 
bfi 



'a 

-2 3 



© © 

rg\ PM 3 ■ 

S &0.-B a 

-2.S ^ 3 



pq 



S-i 
3 

Ol 



lO s 



•O i-i 

o 8»«h 

+a 4 O 

X3 r— l 

^ . cd 
O U1 O 
& • "^ 

O h 
Mn O 



o 

4 " 

-^| cd 

3-2 

"1 3 
Sh -3 
o> o 

+J 4 
U +J 
3 

3 3 
O'— 1 



J. 3 






g cd 4 

S 'iH DO 





XI 


Ol 


(fl 


1> 


qj 






'II 




3 




0) 


X 


X 


4 



3 3 

■" 3 

to bo 



S -3 
ft £ 

s 

S'fl 
4 
bo 



3 3 to 

4 "42 4 

"« ® Si 

OQ a * 

3 b 

■OSS 

4 O cd 

S ° 3 

ft « 
ft 



3 

3 

<D 



5 3 

a S 

3 „C 

CJ <D 

O Sh 

> ft 



3 B 

.a 4 



|H *^ »H 



O) 3 
h3 « 



4 >5 



■< 4 >> 
3 3 3 

«3 03 

* *H 

3<3 ° 

Mi 

J h O 

<t bO 4 



3 <« .& 

CP 4 S 

R 4' -2 » 

ft &.S 03 

s a ^ s 

o «„-- 

a u 3 -a 

<H fife 

t>, 3 



3 

4 O 

i cd 

3 b 

r3 Q3 



3 3 
2 3 

c a 

4 % 
4 3 

+J X) 

* 4 

oT ^^ 
bO 3 



^ 3 3 u 

4 cd 3 o 

a Sh 3 

P S 5 3 » 

Sh O fi -U 

B S ° 3 

aj ft o •+-> 



a ° 

3 W3 

cr 03 

«3 
— Sh 

15 O 
2 Sh 

x .a 

-^ 4 

bo£ 

.s«m 

Sh O 

3g 

io '43 

O 03 

w . ft 

i© g 
t3 3 

J8 ° 

"cd . 

■U Sh 
O 4 



Sh 3 
O 



ft 3 

-3 2 



ts a 

3 c 

§ i 

03 

^ 3 
^ 3 

-5 > 
3 T3 
«3 cd 



3 3 



4 

4 B 



m 



a 



r-f tO 

iJ s 

■a 3 

2 *- 

a 5>o 

ftg 

4 & 

bo„ 
4 cd 

% % 



i 

s- 

3 
3 

CT Sh 

35 3 

3 2 



3 03 



<H 03 



M 4^ 
2 ta 

w 4 

>»S 

•3 h-i 

3 Sh 
+j 03 
CD 4 



03 

X 4 

3 

. 3 

•9. -B 



2 o 3 4 



4 .C 



Sh 3 

33 cj 

3 « 5R ?-B 



si 4 4 03 +3 



Q3 

r3 



3 



4 sh 
fi ° 



BSaB 



bo 



c o 

3 a 

-b 3 

-M 3 



3 fe 

ft 



o 



O -3 »3 



+3 -3 



2 B-i 



\D Z 



o 
c 
o 

£ 

o 
c 
o 



jn 

O 

o 

> 
o 

to 



c 
o 

J 

"o 

C 



(A 

>s 

o 

J) 

"o 
U 



c 

3 

E 

£ 

o 

u 

(A 

o 

c 



o 



o 

Z 



OB3 

4 ^H 

S 3 

o r- 1 

o -e 



.^ p h-> +j K c c 



> 03 IB 

3 B3 C 
Q 3 



B 

4 Sh 

4 S3 

Sh rr; 

ft o 
o 

°. fi 

r-l 3 
Sh 

2 r* 

X5 C 
Ol ■« 

03 
CJ 

X X 

4 



mm. 
C C 4 



4 

U bi„ 

,2 3 



3 4- 



f^3 = 



CO 



-m C -i-> 

B 3 l» 

^ B fi 



03 03 

•+J rfi 



3 •« 

.3 3 co 
3 2 B 

-B a w 

03 i^H ( ! 

H g 3 
bo^ -1 "3 
.5 M 

s a h 

ffi > 



3 *a 

so b 

•-h . CJ 

B B H 

hh a 

- 1 fi 

3 a .a 

° C 35 

fi r 9 Sh 

^ O Cd 

-C 3 Sh 

ri? 4 fi 

O •<•* 4 

-u Ph O 



4 TJI 
3^ 

•43 w 

to *H 

3 B 

4 cd 

3 be 

•g 3 
r^ -B 

■S4S 



H 4 

35 ^ 

3 Eh 
Mh 

93 'cd 

3 lO 4-> 

— CO o 

cd oi +» 
C3 



O 



■3 

S 

3 3 

+J Sh 



OJ 



03 
„ rfi 

3 .a 

2 bo & 

-* 1 B 

a 2 

c 

<p 






bO 

4 
h3 C£> 

T3 



id 4 



4 



^ B 



O S 



c 3 oa 

a b« c 

o 

03 03 '43 
bo bo 3 

4 cd -•-> 

3 "S'-g 

° S.S 

>•, 03 
•a ft Sh 
C 4 

3 -^ rfi 

SCO H-> 
03 O 



to 3 3 -43 
co B ^ 



o 

CJ 

S*3 

C rfi 

3 cj 
O * 



a 4 

fi 03 
4 +J 



03 C 
3 M 



03 -r 

-B § 

t^ 
bo o 

3 m 
3 fi 

r3 4 

73 s3 

CO* 4 
rH rfi 

T3 

r2"S 

3 

-rJ Sh 
O 4 



93 

2-43 

3 „J, 

Sh 35 

be 5 

^ -J 

*> n 

XJ "H 

Id 

-u 

O 

< 



3 .a 

3 co 

, a- b 

' 4 

— H +J 

3 g 

«(H 13 

OJ 4 

rfi -f. 



03 4 

03 ,C 

CO to 

4 rg 
CO § 

g g 

o H 



o 



bo C 

C •" 

'h t3 

3 4 

73 ft 

03 Sh 

c B 

Sh 03 
4 

■"3 03 

3 Sh 

+j 03 

CO £ 

B -H 

33 4 



2 >? s 



3 .a 

-1 3 

be § 

O " 

% B 

03 O 

rfi » 

* 4' 

«H rfi " 

O -P 

4 B 

to .a 

3 

rfi ft 

ft 3 



03 3 

h3 3 

4 4J 

•° 3 

3 3 



3 

5? I 

(-■ Sh 

±3 4 

^ bo 



rfi ^l 

« -2 

CD ^J 



a c 

fi rfi 

03 o 

rfi H 





bf 


Sh 


3 


I ) 




<4H 


XJ 


3 


o 


3 


ffi 


bt 




Ol 


^ 


bO 




3 

-r-J 


^ 



3 

co Ph 
XS 



> 4 

3 bO 

Pi! 



-M 3 
to cj 

B '3 
hh 3 

rfi 

_ CJ 

s£ 

^rS 

cj •H 

4 



C 3 

3 rfi 
O +5 

o 

C.S 
O 



vH 



Si B 

4 Qj 

ft H-> 



. o 

4 O 



co C 



gffl 



rfi O 4 



S 3 

^3 

•+J 

•S-33 

Sh CO 

3 c 



ma 

> 

- 4 
4 JS 
+3 X? 

3 



43 3 

a o 



<JtS s 



r^ 2 4 

t^ 2 

O fi 

« - I 

4 fi 
03 bo 3 
Sh 4 -X 

03 — <3 

fe o 
o o 

HJ 4 
ft — ' ■+■> 

O C 3 
•+J 3 -4-> 

fi '■£ 

4 3 co 
•3 £ C 

-►-> o i-i 

fi^r^ 

■-I 3 

So 
•fi 

Sh 3 fi 

2 rfi ^ 

-fi ho ^ 

O.S H 



rfi CO X3 

. 3 4^ 3 
4 3-3 



'43 £ 

g 4 

3 H-> 

,rH C 

__ 4 

3 u 

.2 fi 
c.S 

rfi 43 

o 3 

03 CJ 

+-» 3 

•3 

© « 

W 3 

rfi Sh 



3 


co 


4J 


cu 


43 

CO 


bo 

03 


3 




r— 1 


© 




I J 






3 




4 


> 


3 


+J 


r3 


3 



•s I' 



03 JH 

£ 3 
3 O 

rfi 

a 4 

3 03 

Q r£ 

X3 H 
fi 

3 



bo B 



^ 33 3 



•r o 



+J 


co 

>, 
to 


3 


o 


3 


rr: 


3 

3 


Sh 

o 


J3 


+J 


fa 


o 

Sh 


y, 


03 


-u 


3 
4 


m 


3 
(1) 


Sh 
01 


O 


60 
_CJ 


CJ 

3 

<+H 


s 


+H 

3 

CJ 




Sh 

3 


,3 


O 




O 


"3 


3 


4-J 

o 


O 


CJ 

Jfi 


3 


-i-^ 


In 


cr 


>, 


H-J 


o> 


CO 


rfl 


31 


Sh 


+j 




Sh 






ro 


bo 


3 


|r»l 


CJ 


■i-j 
3 


O 


«H 


3 
3 






Sh 


OJ 




Tt 


£ 


T3 
CJ 
4-> 


3 
|"1 


3 
> 


4 


CO 
C5S 


E 

c 

3 

CJ 

ft 


H 


o 1 


+J 


r-H 


c 

O 

CO 

"cd 

3 


4 

•3 

3 
CO 


3 

«H 

k© 
CO 


Of 

o> 

cu 


CJ 
>3 

O 
X. 


CJ 
Jfi 


4 




0^ 




>, 




X 


C 




H 


+J 


Sh 


a 

CJ 

£ 


H 


Sh 
3 

Q 


£ 

CJ 

+-> 


CJ 

rfi 


'a 


3 

CJ 

C 



4 11© 
Sh fi CO 
O 4 i 
fi H< 

K"tO 

3 Oi 

M-l O T ~ i 

o ■+-> 

0} 4 

4 rfi .a 



CJ 



o 



o 

Sh 
3 



w 

«H 

' O 

'TS 
Sh 

3 
C 

pq 



to 33 



Sh 03 

3 cj Sh 
Sh O 
0) "H 

% ft 

4 oo c 

to OO 03 

2 c £ 

ft 3 rfi 
?rS? 

Sh +J Si 



XJ 
3 ' 
tl & 

a« 

4 . 

O 



3 



in 



CJ 
r3 



rfi C 

■+-> 4 

v "3 
bO 3 
fi h^ 

•rH CO 
-(J 

CJ +3 

4 fi 

S-2 

3 
>> > 

31 

3 a 1 

3 » 

3 03 

"* £ 



lO 




ft 


> 


CO 


3 




O 


OJ 




CJ 




rH 


rfi 


rfi 


CJ 




-r-> 


4J 


fi 


4 








rfi 


ts 


CO 





C Sh 

'fi 3 

3 ft 



CJ T3 



3 T3 CJ 



! — i O 3 



•H • g o 



3 

3 <tn 



-2 Sh' 

O 

3 



Sh 

3 to 
ft 4 

4 bo 

Or2 



M 
OJ 

CM 



® Sh ^ 



o 

O ,_• 

». 3 
CM «H 



rfi J, 4 

g .2 s 
33 -e 43 

Sh i 

3 35 
ft 3 

«fH 

4 

to -, 

° s 

3 -B 2 

fi -M rfi 
•rH ^j 

-*j bo 

fi fi gg 

3 3 

O " cj 

Sh _C 

S "" C 
o 



^ Sh 

2q 

3 
ft ! _ < - 

£ 3 
O 03 
" >> 

to 

3 h-> 
to 
O 3 
O — ' 
O 

§"§ 

at2 



> CO CO 

4 g -S 

3 IS^ 

0} fH I© 

,3 £ co 

S3 cu ' 

4-3 43 ^t 1 

CO CO 

C >>05 

03 CO i 

rfi 

P 4 

bo' 



B h B 

3 4 3 

rfi ■£ -fi 

3 

4 oh - 

O r— 

£ "3 
«H ' 

> £S ^ 



CO 

■ 

<M 
CO 

Ol 9) 
*H 3 

sh.2 

o 43 

"" -2 



3 £ 



CO 

m 3 
o O 



a s 

tH O +» 

Sh 3 
ft ft 



M 3 .fi • 
S3 

CO rfi CO 

■- ' 3 

.2 - X5 

ffl+J «I 

3 '5 ,2 

r© P PH 



! — I 


X. 4 •a 


u 


4 Sh rfi fi 


O 


N 3 -P 2 




Pfll 


+3 


Sw §2 


3 


C3^ - « 


3 


fc-a « 


F 


03 
fell — " 


£ 





bein 
total 
doub 
FTE 



X 

fi 

4 

£ P 

^ 4 
to 17 
0) « 



"«* 



o .a 

to CO 

h B g,.s 

HJ .rH bO 

"fi r2 

S O rfi 

2 <tt o 
£ 4 r 

co 
5 ^4^ 

o-g-g 

ft 3 

lip 

o - 

Sh r- CJ 

3 fi 

4 03 (v, • 
t>. -p ^^ E 

.2 co w . 

rfi CO 

HO) (3 p 
bo o 

0) -rH 




•T3 co 

HH CD 

CO 3 

03 i 

OT CO 



-H 

3 
C 



Sh > 



3 a 1 
a m 



s- 1 3 
+-> M 

03 fe 

3. « 

^£ 

-1-3 
co 03 

a; r3 

3 S 



' < Sh 

53 o > 

03 > 

■fi 'S __ 

03 rj T3 



02 



03 
O o 
?8 ni 



» 1) i 

<fH 

CD 

r3 tO 

to 



03 



GQ«w -^ 



& s h 



o « 

rH 

s s 

cy I— i 



Sh -u 

CO 3 3 

2 a> a> 



^ s 

r- *H 
•^ FH 

bo 1 ^ 

b <s 

r3 

+3 -tn 
3 

t-i cd 



° s 

03 i 

>>r3 

o 3 

s » 

§ s 

s ^ 

3 iH 



ft^: 



oi r3 
O 4) 

tx3 > 

cd 

co Q 

S u 
a <d 

rH fe 

bo S 

2 & 

<h 5 



CD T3 

ft 2 

O ■* 
CD - 

CD 

b >> 



■< Sh 
CD 

bo^ 

s S 



s s 

co o3 
«r3 

i £ 
1* 



S.S § 



00 g 

-3 

+3 43 

3 

* r3 

o3 bo 

> 3 
f-j o 
3 Sh 

1 j3 
CD -+J 



T3 j3 

3 be 

03 3 

.. O 

O r3 
• f-H -fJ n^ 

CO 43 

co 'O to 
•3 CD >s 

5 03 
3 3 4> 

o a be 

u hS 
h S ° 

3 »s 

O •" 

03 to 3 



GO 






CD C3 



O 4) CD 

P< +3 +-> 



D 1 T3 
CD CD 



G CD CD 



-M CD 



3 



01 



cS P. 

o 

co 

S .2 

2 S 
bo § 

3 +j 

3 O 

r3 

bO ^ 
3 T3 
*3 <D 



CO CD 

3 ,3 

O 43 
co 



o 



O CO o 



Sh <-h — ' 

ft ?o o 

Sh P 

O Sh 03 

«H r3 ,3 

+3 +3 

m I 



CD 
> 

-S 3 .a 



e 2 

£ s * 

43 O r3 

b _c bo 



r3 co 

bo T3 

r- CD 

+3 B 



5 * ... 
!> a) 



ft 



bo g 

3 CD 
*Q3 -? 



• rH OS 

43 H 

'2 ►». 03 

B p V 

s '8 £ 

g 3 

O 3 vy 



X CD 
03 - 



ft 



ft 

£ 

CD 



CD 

bO 

CD 



S h 



? 5 ^3 

h s +3 

bo o 

o co 

C CD 

§ 2 S 

•»-H H-H r~^ 

+3 -1H> > 



V 3 
I ""8 
-'■: 

It. x$ 
■ - - 



?o 



-C 5 
30> 



H 5 3 

•-fid 

H 8 tl 



S 03 

fS 3 

bo co 

O Sh 

Sh CD 

ft ft 



:oo 
■■:'- 



B,5« 

J (n 8 
H-33 
> B3 
<30 

ye* 

oC 



Sh <D 

O Sh 

«H <V 

r3 

^^ 

1,3 3 
3 CD 

43 S 

co -rr 1 

"aj hhi 
co c 

CD 
CO g 
'" CD 



CD M 
CD 

r3 



CS 



CD 



*rt 8 

S 2 

Sh «4H 

O ^~- 
<+H 

CO 

O Sh 
<_ © 

CS 

>,8 



Sh 

o 

h3.-£ 

bo 3 3 

sS £ 8 

S£ 8 

^3 . ° 

bO^ uj 

5 HO r3 

2 2! 

-B '3 73 

*" ^ 3 

■3 «« * 

> m Sh 

(Uw o 



o 2^ 



s n3 

c3 -jh> 
U 03 
CD 
b0<3 
B33 

-D Sh 
CO JD 
CD O 

43 

00 ® 

53 ta 

« ±5 
43 co 

co 

S «8 



>>T3 T3 

U 3 CD 

3 03 2 

£ . 3 

> <» S 

•rH H_) i> 

Cf 1 03 h3 

CD Sh 

„ bo co 

O 1) 

_, CD 03 

"S 3> 4 J 

n co 
to hw 

XI 03 Sh 

^^ -g 

«H CO 

O 03 m 



T3 " .S 
o3 cy T3 
H Sh Sh 

bo o3 o 



Sh ^3 
,Q «3 



CD +3 

bo -3 

CD 3 
— CO 



^2 3 « 



&K-K 



0) 

bo 

03 

o 

cj 

CD 
CO 
<D 
£3 



^,3 

^° 

3 co 

' O « 



3 » 



bO 0) 



Sh 



CD 



rn" bo,2 



03 o3 



^ S 

3 « 

o .S 



3 
3 03 

-•, 8 4? 

--i 03 03 bo 
n t3 h — 

° tH-O 

<D >j 03 

c •" bo^ 

B Sh CD "fH 

Sh 

O 



CO 



03 


O 


p-H 


Sh 




3 


< 


CD 




CO 




-4-» 


CD 


3 


CD 


0) 


Sh 


Tl 


bo 




CD 


H-H 


« 


CO 




CD 


CO 


^3 


-4-J 


-u 


Sh 




< 





03 3 
Sh CD 
03 
ft 
O 



03 

b0_ 
CD TS 
33 CD 
O ' 





3 

_o 

03 
3 
T3 
03 
Sh 

bo 

3 

o 
ft 
3 



O 



03 

CD 

Sh 

o 

£ 

o 

bO 3 A 

o 03 a 

Sh Sh o 
ft bO CO 



e 4 1 

5 bo 

03 

2 S 

O Sh 

O 03 

CO ft 



CJ 
CD 
ft 
Sh X 

a 03 . 

03 CO 

2 bt 

1 *s 

43 "o 

=38° 

2 03 ^ 



3 H OJ 
■5 ft co 



Sh 
03 
3 
c3 
O 



5« 



Sh 

Q 



»3 

-■:!: 






A 

^ I 
+3 o 

03 

03 Sh 

Sh 03 

,03 ^3 

53 bO 

O 3 

bo^ 

.5 O 

03 OS 

03 
Sh 

03 to 
3 

o 



03 73 
^o3 

03 H 



«H 3 

03 

«^3 

03 bo 

bO .5 

03 ^ 

r— , CJ 
« O 

O Ph 

CJ i 



43 13 

co 3 

3 3 

*-* O 

_ O 

.2 03 

c J 

^3 M 
o 

03 

H 2 



I I 

Sh " 
03 o 
ft %i 

-, G 
03 03 

&H 
2 fe 



-3 _ 
bO 03 
3 



3 03 

3 bo 

03 03 

bos 
o 

03 
bo 



33 3? 3 

O 

Sh 

03 

o 



8 a . ^ 



8 Sh 



03 3 

Sh +J 

o 5 - 



>> > 



ft. 5 



3 ^ 

S 03 
3 03 

ShH 1 



Sh 

O 
^^ <4H 
03 

Sh ^ 

3 »*0 

« sH 



co e 

® Si' 
.2 9. 

^^ 

CD 
CD 



8; 



03 3 
O 3 

03 g 
ft g 

03 

bo .2 

3 +3 



CD 

03 a, 

CD 

!h 

Id o 



jt*noit-NNtCMtomTtHint-«W(Ncioot-H(DoomH«t-(rt-ooNHi<Qoc;t-t 

iXHODCOt-OOMMOOOMOnHMOCTfOinff-t-t-WOOei^WCO'tfi^inHNH'^M 
H rHCOOOUirHcqt-^J'C^lO ^fO t-H^ rH^J 1 MHWH^lO CJ C*3 O N rH 

N rH 3 IN rH 3 3 



CO 04 t-t 



1- 


00 


Ol -«* i-H 




N 


CO iH O 


10 


H 


1— 1 •* 1-4 



OJ c- CT> t- <jj <£> t>] W CO KD tr- <£• CO t- 

COH i-H <X> i-H co CO 00 t-OCON 



OO'Xti-H'rjicO^iOCJi— 1 Gi CO <£> CO SV • 



^OMH^io(» t ,ffiiMNOiNiOOO.COO<NH^cOW 1 ^in|>cOHi»OtD«Tl'CCiNTfiiot-tO 
■^M W t- -^WaiGit-Wl^tOHW O0«-it-C--cOiC* , H H '^PtOT}<»C'*CHO'— iC£3»OTt< O ■** CO (T. CO 

■^ r-l rH ,_, tM rH OJ W T)> H CO r-i rH rH <M W rH CO CO 












Hi^inoj 


tOHHOOlOO 






CD 


Csl -^ C> CM rH t> CO 






«<J) rH CO 


HWV COW 


C-l 





to C3 c to t- M 00 to o 

tDtjDlCCvlinOOOO'^t'CO 



woot- 

IOWH 

CJ CM 



N CO 04 W ^* i-l CO N 



•^QOCOOO HTfOo W* 
•"tftOCOr-- HH(Ooi COtO 
NNHf- COrHlOiC IO CO 



,_, 





OT- '".. 


to ^ 10 






a, r - 


rH CO CI 


iO 


CO 


rH Tf 


IO ^ CO 



CI 


N 


lOOO 


©CO ^ 


Tfl 


-f 


to 00 




CO 


H 


1— 1 rH 





t--*Ht- 
U5 -^00 c-J 
0103 T# 



rH CO rH 

rH 00 CO 

CM N 



©<£> CO CO 






Sr3r 



o e 

O o 



o 
Q 

j=Eh 
s'E £•_ 
' ca 5 « 






Sja 






•3- £-2 



Eh 

„r* 3 

5 u 

» at 

ft™ c 
cs e9 4* 



e . 

itS o 

1 ° s 



,2 o 



s's; .rSH-a 



cs< 



C*T3 

5'pi. 
ens 



Of- 

c e 
3 c o 



.5 



j="£ K 



;C^SS^- i;B - : rHir , 









U 



3 S « 

Ur3rJ 



OS, 



KK 



u .8 

"r- U0 ^ 

£ .cjEf-2 
5 ^!K 



SSrS r-, . 

9 cs o 3 • 
DStfcococofH 



Sf- 
. 4, 

^£ 

■ a 

rttt 



•s u 

•5 C'c CUch" 
s sJr o ^ 

•«0J c*§ c c 
'« 0—33 

r « M L O O 

"EEc u 
«) cs ea S » c 

Or, en 5^ o 



rB&tft 



s a 
gig 

.5 rl m 
• r- O C 

d h O 

rH CL ' S 

E-i "S 
to m *. S 

EpnuS 

ggg < & 

g«£S§"S 3 

CH t*ro D 1 - 1 
- .ECHO'S 

g c e H gr 
g o n b. ft E 

.2 3 « ? e o o 

« r. 0) II « C-0 
* SrH^g O 






iTrll^g 

>Hr]ZSH. 



I 03 



r> <U 3 

S3 ™ ! T^ 

^O C 

o C a 

iH 

«,* 

* I '. 

BOH 



W 
H 

01 
o 01 

tj4> S 

QJ P fe 

Gph C 

w 3 

c^ x 2 

o g M 

S »* 

Sh 0) H 
S CS 03(1, 
Pi & 

ft CS 



r^i? 

D 



. cS 



O 



-W 
WH 
■ife 



Prevalence of Small High Schools in Southeast 
Cited as Prime Obstacle to Quality Education 



A two-year study encompass- 
ing 11 Southeastern states, com- 
pleted in December by the Center 
for Southern Education Studies 
at George Peabody College for 
Teachers in Nashville, Tenn., cites 
the "prevalence of small high 
schools" as the most serious ob- 
stacle to quality education in 
southern high schools. 

The thought is not a new one 
among North Carolina educators 
who have for 50 years been pro- 
moting consolidation as the means 
of establishing comprehensive 
high schools, Superintendent of 
Public Instruction Charles F. Car- 
roll said when asked to comment 
on the report. Dr. Carroll listed 
an enrollment of 750 as an accept- 
able minimum for a good compre- 
hensive high school and said such 
a school should concern itself 
with four types of curricula: col- 
lege preparatory; general educa- 
tion (for those not going to col- 
lege) ; vocational education; and 
terminal education (for those who 
will not finish high school). 
Progress Cited 

To illustrate progress made in 
North Carolina in consolidation, 
Dr. Carroll pointed out that in 
1929-30 the State had 145 high 
schools with only one or two 
teachers. Today North Carolina 
has only 15 such schools. On the 
other hand, in 1934-35 the State 
had only 63 high schools with 12 
or more teachers; now there are 
413 high schools with more than 
12 teachers. 

The Peabody study encompasses 
almost one-fourth of the conti- 
nental United States, including 
4,776 schools enrolling 2,318,449 
youth. The states are Alabama, 
Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Ken- 
tucky, Louisiana, North Cai'olina, 
South Carolina, Mississippi, Ten- 
nessee, and Virginia. The report, 
called "High Schools in the South: 
A Fact Book," reveals curriculum 
in most high schools meet gradu- 
ation requirements and college 
entrance demands but offers little 
for the majority of students who 
do not go to college. It shows a 
clear relationship between the 
size of a high school and the ade- 



quacy of its educational oppor- 
tunities. 

Areas of Deficiency 

Fifty-nine percent of the stu- 
dents are in schools offering no 
courses in trade and industrial 
education — a fact impossible to 
reconcile with the pronounced 
shift in the patterns of gainful 
employment in the South, the re- 
port points out. A constant in- 
crease in the number of courses 
offered in basic subjects, such as 
mathematics, is seen as enroll- 
ment increases. Courses in such 
things as art, music, industrial 
arts; in strategic vocational 
areas; and additional courses in 
most academic areas — especially 
foreign languages — increase sig- 
nificantly as enrollments reach 
1,000 or more. The percentage of 
teachers with master's degrees 
favoring the larger schools is 
more than 2 to 1. 

Salaries Compared 

North Carolina's median annual 
salaries, the study shows, are 
higher for high school teachers 
than those of the surrounding 
states. The median salary in this 
State is $4,903 and is third in the 
area, behind Louisiana and Flori- 
da. Louisiana's median annual 
salary is $5,337. The last four 
places on the salary scale are held 
by Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, 
and Mississippi, in that order. 
The median salary for a Missis- 
sippi high school teacher is 
$3,585 a year. 

Other Findings 

Original and unique analyses 
from the report include: 

« A four-year high school should 
offer at least three times as many 
courses as are required for grad- 
uation. 

• Fifty course credits typically 
are found at the 1,000 enrollment 
level. 

• There is no relationship be- 
tween the size of school and the 
"variety" of subject areas offered. 
An increase in number of courses 
usually means "adding more of 
the same." (The findings do not 
indicate whether this weakness is 
due to the vested interests in cur- 
riculum planning or to a lack of 



awareness of what "breath of op- 
portunity" means.) 

• No differences are found in 
the costs of instruction in either 
adding more of the same courses 
or adding other subject areas. It 
appears that program planners in 
the larger schools have neglected 
chances to broaden curriculum of- 
ferings for the young who will 
enter the labor force. 

Main Implications 

The implications of the findings 
are that the quality of the high 
school program must be improved 
■ — -and improvement is dependent 
upon overcoming the inequalities 
of educational opportunity per- 
petuated by small high schools. The 
analysis of the survey points out 
that there must be enough children 
to permit the organization of effi- 
cient, economical, and adequate 
schools. To accomplish this, it will 
be necessary in many instances to 
combine some school systems. 

Doubt was expressed that such 
reorganization will be accom- 
plished on a wide scale basis 
through the so-called "democratic 
process" or local self-determina- 
tion. Constitution amendments 
were suggested, to direct state 
boards of education to define uni- 
form criteria of a satisfactory 
school system and to administer 
reorganization under statutory 
mandates. Then, one must not con- 
clude that adequate high school 
centers will necessarily follow 
sound school system reorganization 
because "local resistance to con- 
solidating small school centers into 
larger ones may be even stronger 
than the resistance to school sys- 
tem consolidation." 

State's Driver Program 
Receives National Award 

North Carolina was one of nine 
states receiving an Award of 
Achievement for its driver educa- 
tion program in the public schools 
during the 1964-65 school year. 

The award is given annually by 
the Insurance Institute for High- 
way Safety and to be considered a 
state must have enrolled at least 
60 percent of its eligible students 
in a qualifying course. Other states 
receiving the award were Dela- 
ware, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Iowa, 
Kansas, Maine, and Utah. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



State's Response in Special Lunch Program 
Commended by Freeman as 'Prompt, Effective' 



Secretary of Agriculture Orville 
L. Freeman has commended North 
Carolina for its "prompt and effec- 
tive action" to bring nutritious 
lunches to thousands of needy chil- 
dren as part of a new demonstra- 
tion program of special assistance 
to schools in low-income areas. 

The commendation was in a let- 
ter to Governor Dan K. Moore and 
referred to the quick implementa- 
tion of the special federal assist- 
ance project and the "overwhelm- 
ing" response to it. 

0. L. Searing, supervisor of 
School Food Services for the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
sees the project as a demonstration 
of what "could be accomplished if 
funds were available." 

The last session of Congress 
funded Section 11 of the National 
School Lunch Act for the nation- 
wide pilot project with each state 
to share equitably in the $2 million 
appropriation. North Carolina's 
share was $74,800 which Searing 
says "is only a drop in the bucket 
when you consider the number of 
needy students enrolled in public 
schools throughout the State." 
Purpose of the program, Searing 
explained, is "to sell lunches at a 
price all students in the selected 
schools can afford and to encour- 
age greater participation in the 
federal school lunch program." 
Six Schools 

Six schools in North Carolnia 
were selected to participate in the 
project on criteria of need and 
willingness to implement and effec- 
tively administer the program. The 
schools are reimbursed at a rate 
of 15 cents per lunch and the sale 
price is 10 or 15 cents per lunch 
to the students. The federal re- 
imbursement and 10 or 15 cents 
paid by the students brings lunch- 
room income in the pilot schools to 
the 25 and 30 cents charged in 
other schools. 

The program went into effect 
during the third week of Decem- 
ber. The number of lunches served 
during the first day was up 157 
percent and had climbed to 188 



percent by the third day. In one 
school, on the first day the program 
was in effect the number of lunches 
served went up from the average 
of 303 to 1,161. 

About one-third of the children 
in the six schools selected in North 
Carolina to participate in the proj- 
ect are from families with incomes 
of $2,000 a year or less. Fewer 
than 30 percent of the children in 
the schools were previously buying 
the school lunches available. Un- 
der the special assistance program, 
when the lunch price was dropped 
to 10 and 15 cents, it immediately 
increased participation to nearly 
three-quarters of the children at- 
tending all six schools. 



Planetarium Programs 
For School Groups 

The Morehead Planetarium at 
Chapel Hill during the current 
public school year is presenting 
two programs for school groups 
which are designed to give a 
meaningful introduction to na- 
ture's sky as it will be seen over 
central North Carolina in the 
early hours of the evening. 

Richard S. Knapp, educational 
programs assistant at the plane- 
tarium, explained that the pro- 
grams reflect changes appearing 
in the night sky in the passage of 
time. Groups which have seen 
either of the introductory pro- 
grams during the fall will find 
that the subject matter in the 
spring will have changed com- 
pletely. 

Both programs are offered on 
Wednesday, Thursdays, and Fri- 
days on advance reservation. The 
one for lower elementary grade 
children is "Learning the Sky" 
and is presented at 10 a.m. Older 
groups may see "Exploring the 
Sky" at 2 p.m. 

The programs are offered in re- 
sponse to requests by many North 
Carolina teachers for a program 
to help students find the basic 
constellations in the apparent 
confusion of thousands of stars 
seen on a clear night. 



Tuition Grant Suit Will 
Be Heard February 23 

A suit opposing a controversial 
State tuition grant to the parents 
of a Mecklenburg County boy will 
go before a three-judge Federal 
tribunal in Charlotte on Febru- 
ary 23. 

Three Mecklenburg Negro fami- 
lies in December filed the suit to 
block payment of the $256 grant, 
through the Charlotte-Mecklenburg 
Board of Education, to Lewis Wil- 
son McClain for his son's attend- 
ance at Carolina Military Academy. 
The youth had transferred from 
the desegrated West Mecklenburg 
High School. Request for the grant 
was made to the State Board of 
Education under North Carolina's 
1956 Pearsall Plan which provides 
funds for students who do not wish 
to attend integrated schools. 

The State Board of Education, 
following receipt of a ruling from 
the Attorney General's office, ap- 
proved payment of the grant, con- 
tingent upon the availability of 
funds from the Department of 
Administration. The plaintiffs in 
the suit contend that the grant is 
unconstitutional and that such 
grants contribute to continued 
school segregation. 

Late in December the plaintiffs 
sought an injunction to prevent 
payment of the grant. Judge J. 
Braxton Craven, Jr. denied the 
injunction. 

First Test 

The hearing in February will 
constitute the first test of the 1956 
Pearsall Plan. The grant to Mc- 
Clain is the only one ever approved. 

The three-judge panel to hear 
the case is headed by Federal Ap- 
peals Court Judge J. Spencer Bell 
of Charlotte. The other two are 
District Judges Craven and Edwin 
M. Stanley. 

Meanwhile, U. S. Attorney Gen- 
eral Nicholas Katzenbach an- 
nounced in Washington January 12 
that the Justice Department will 
join the Charlotte plaintiffs in the 
suit seeking to declare the Pearsall 
Plan unconstitutional. 



FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



11 



Educators From Overseas Observe State Schools; 
Part of USOE International Teacher Programs 



Ten foreign teachers have been 
observing school systems in North 
Carolina during January and Feb- 
ruary through the U. S. Office of 
Education's International Teacher 
Development Programs. 

Besides studying American edu- 
cation in seminar programs on 
college campuses, before starting 
their program of observation in 
early January, they attended a two- 
day orientation session at the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
in Raleigh. Before leaving the 
State the latter part of February 
they were due back at the State 
Department to give their informal 
impressions of the State's educa- 
tional system and programs. 

Miss Manju S. Sharma of Nepal 
is specializing in secondary admin- 
istration and is headmistress of 
Nari Gyan Mandir Adult High 
School. She has been observing the 
State Board of Education's Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges. Miss 
Kyriaki Couloumbi of Greece is 
interested in secondary supervision 
and was assigned to the New Han- 
over County schools. She is a 
teacher of ancient and modern 
Greek, Latin, history, and logic in 
Argostoli. 

Riaz A. Urfee of Pakistan, prin- 
cipal of the Jamia Chrishta High 
School, has been observing second- 
ary school administration at the 
Fayetteville City Schools. Mrs. 
Nadirs Hoda of Pakistan has been 
in the Chapel Hill City Schools. 
Her position at home is head mis- 
tress of the Central Preparatory 
School in Dacca. 

Miss Haji Rahmati of Iran 
teaches housekeeping, child care, 
cooking, sewing, and decorating in 
Sherzad High School in Tehran. 
She has been observing in the 
Burlington City Schools and is 
specializing in home economics. 
Chuan Hong Wee of Malaysia is a 
teacher of shorthand, typing, and 
English composition in the Gov- 
ernment Commercial Secondary 
School at Singapore. He has been 
observing commercial classes in the 
Charlotte/Mecklenburg Schools. 



Mrs. Nahid Soraya of Iran, spe- 
cializing in secondary supervision, 
has been in the Greensboro City 
Schools. At her home in Tehran 
she is a teacher of business cor- 
respondence, office management, 
shorthand, and English-typing and 
accounting. From Meshhad, Iran, 
Mohammad Shamashirsaz is an 
agriculture teacher in Khorasan 
Agricultural Training Center. He 
has been observing in the Bladen 
County Schools. 

Mrs. Johara Shariff of Malaysia 
teaches cookery and needlework 
and is in charge of training stu- 
dent teachers at the Language In- 
stitute in Kuala Lumpur. She has 
been observing home economics 
classes in the Forsyth/Winston- 
Salem schools. Mrs. Kaushalya D. 
Joshi of Nepal teaches home sci- 
ence, hygiene, English, and physi- 
ology in Kanya High School at 
Lainchaur. She has been observing 
in the Granville County Schools. 



'Why Vietnam' Film Now 
Available for Schools 

"Why Vietnam," a 32-minute 
16mm sound film in black and 
white produced by the Armed 
Forces Information and Education 
section of the U. S. Department of 
Defense for military personnel, is 
now available for civilian non- 
profit showing. 

The film is recommended fox- 
high school students by Dr. Lynn 
M. Bartlett, Deputy Assistant Sec- 
retary of Defense (Education). 
The motion picture opens with 
President Johnson addressing the 
American people and the world on 
July 28, 1965 and elaborates on the 
basic points he set forth. Scenes 
showing the struggle in Vietnam 
illustrate and explain the U. S. 
position as set forth by the Presi- 
dent. Secretary of State Dean Rusk 
explains the numerous attempts to 
bring about a cease-fire. 

The picture is available without 
charge through the Air Force Film 
Library Center, 8900 South Broad- 
way, St. Louis, Mo. 



Supervisor Reviews 
Library Legislation 

"New Library Legislation," an 
article by Cora Paul Bomar, super- 
visor of Library and Instructional 
Materials Services, State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, ap- 
peared in the November 1965 issue 
of The Instructor. 

Recent Federal legislation, Miss 
Bomar states, has opened a "new 
era for school libraries" by incor- 
porating a number of provisions to 
assist their development. 

Focusing first on the most recent 
and comprehensive educational leg- 
islation, the Elementary and Sec- 
ondary Education Act, she notes 
that all five of the Act's titles open 
avenues for improvements in school 
library programs: 

• Employment of librarians and 
library supervisors, renovation or 
construction of library quarters, 
and acquisition of precatalogued 
collections of library materials are 
possibilities under Title I. 

• Appropriations for school li- 
brary resources, textbooks, and 
other instructional materials are 
made available under Title II. 

• Special library centers may be 
established under Title III. 

• Research relating to school 
libraries can materialize under 
Title IV. 

• Part of the funds made avail- 
able to state educational agencies 
under Title V can be used to estab- 
lish or extend state school library 
supervisory services. 

She then briefly reviews specific 
provisions of the amended National 
Defense Education Act of 1958 and 
the Economic Opportunity Act of 
1964. The former legislation au- 
thorizes financial assistance for 
acquisition of supplementary li- 
brary materials in several areas 
and for setting up institutes to 
improve the qualifications of school 
librarians ; while the latter Act 
offers the possibility of employing 
and training young people as 
library assistants. 

Miss Bomar is chairman of the 
Committee on Legislation of the 
American Association of School 
Librarians and is a member of the 
American Library Association's 
Legislative Committee. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Shakespearean Drama School Tour Now Under Way 



For the fourth year many high 
school students throughout North 
Carolina will have an opportunity 
to participate in live Shakespear- 
ean drama through arrangements 
made between the State Board of 
Education and Theatre-In-Educa- 
tion, Inc., a New York company 
of professional actors. 

One-hour performances will be 
put on in 60 schools at no cost to 
the students or schools. The pro- 
gram will consist of exerpts from 
King Henry IV, Part I; Much Ado 
About Nothing; and Romeo and 
Juliet. This year's tour by the pro- 
fessional group will begin at Gar- 
ner High School February 21 and 
conclude at Rocky Mount Senior 
High on April 1. In between per- 
formances will have been given in 
various schools in the counties of 
Durham, Alamance, Guilford, Mad- 
ison, Randolph, Davidson, Forsyth, 
Yadkin, Rowan, Iredell, Caldwell, 
Burke, McDowell, Buncombe, Hay- 
wood, Transylvania, Henderson, 
Rutherford, Gaston, Mecklenburg, 
Stanly, Moore, Scotland, Rocking- 
ham, Cumberland, Wayne, Wilson, 
Edgecombe, Nash and Wake. 

The theatre group specializes in 
furthering the theory of its execu- 



tive producer, Lyn Ely, "To teach 
Shakespeare best, put him where 
he belongs— on a stage." Raymond 
K. Rhodes, Director of the School 
Athletics and Activities section of 
the Department of Public Instruc- 
tion which coordinates the theatre 
schedules with the schools, said 
that the experience of "seeing that 
man Shakespeare" is more enliv- 
ened and clarified when prepared 
for. Therefore, teaching aids have 
been prepared for instructors to 
help them prepare their students 
for the performances. 

The "Suggested Teaching Aids" 
have been mailed to participating 
schools and teachers are urged to 
consider the material and utilize it 
in the most imaginative and thor- 
ough fashion they can. 

The suggested aids for King 
Henry IV, Part I were prepared 
by Mrs. Betty Merrill and Mrs. 
Magdalene C. Pace, English teach- 
ers in the W. G. Enloe High School 
in Raleigh; for Much Ado About 
Nothing, by Mrs. Grace S. Ross, 
Mrs. Mary Phillips, and Mrs. Linda 
Moore, Durham High School; and 
for Romeo and Juliet, by Mrs. 
Thomas Quick, East Rutherford 
High School, Forest City. 



State Staffer Named 
To Federal Area Post 

James W. Warren Jr. of Greens- 
boro, formerly an assistant super- 
visor of Vocational Agriculture in 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction, has joined the staff of 
the Charlottesville, Va. Regional 
Office of the U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion. 

He assumed his new duties as a 
field representative in the Division 
of Adult and Vocational Education 
with the regional unit in mid- 
December. 

A graduate of Agricultural and 
Technical College at Greensboro, 
Warren joined the State Vocational 
Agriculture staff as an assistant 
supervisor in the Veterans Farmer 
Training Program, stationed at 
Greensboro. In 1958, he was named 
district supervisor of Vocational 
Agriculture at Greensboro. 



New Wilkes School Opens 

Wilkes County's newest consoli- 
dated school, Boomer-Ferguson 
Elementary, started operation on 
January 3. 

The $273,708 structure is located 
six miles west of Wilkesboro. 



College Trustees Vote 
Close Adult Classes 

The board of trustees of Central 
Piedmont Community College voted 
January 10 to close 142 basic adult 
education classes rather than abide 
by an Office of Economic Oppor- 
tunity directive. 

The directive came last fall when 
the OEO notified the college that, 
in order to qualify for OEO funds, 
Central Piedmont officials must 
totally integrate all classes in 33 
locations in four counties by buss- 
ing students and faculty members 
from one neighborhood to another. 

College officials say this would 
disrupt the basic concept of the 
adult education courses and prob- 
ably reduce enrollment drastically. 

The federal ruling was contained 
in a letter from the OEO to the 
Charlotte Area Fund, the agency 
which requested $92,000 in anti- 



poverty funds to keep the CPCC 
courses going for the remainder of 
the current fiscal year. Meanwhile, 
the North Carolina Board of Edu- 
cation assured the program's sur- 
vival through January by approv- 
ing a transfer of $22,000 in State 
funds to pay teachers' salaries. 

2,400 Enrolled 

The courses, which enroll 2,400 
adults in Mecklenburg, Union, 
Anson and Stanly Counties, teach 
the basic high school subjects to 
illiterate and semiliterate adults. 

Dr. Richard Hagemeyer, CPCC 
president, said the basic concept of 
the adult education courses is "to 
take the education to the students." 
He said in many of the classes 
throughout the system "whites are 
very much in the minority, while 
in some of the classes Negroes are 
in the minority." 

In mid-January OEO officials 
met with college trustees and Char- 



lotte Area Fund officials and 
worked out an agreement which, 
as the North Carolina Public 
School Bulletin went to press, re- 
mained to be approved by top OEO 
officials in Washington. Should the 
agreement be approved, the college 
trustees would establish attendance 
zones in order to meet the OEO 
policy that freedom of choice at- 
tendance is not acceptable unless it 
furthers integration. The lines 
would be drawn around existing, 
natural neighborhoods and the 
OEO officials meeting in Charlotte 
said enforcement need not be so 
strict as to interfere with students 
in classes already under way. 

Hagemeyer explained that if the 
classes are closed down, they could 
be resumed on a smaller scale July 
1 when the regular Federal appro- 
priations for the next fiscal year 
are received. These appropriations 
are not channeled through OEO. 



FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



13 



General Education Board's Service to State 
Recognized in Resolution of Appreciation 



The State Board of Education, 
at its January 6 meeting, passed a 
resolution expressing appreciation 
to the General Education Board 
for the contributions made by that 
body to education in North Caro- 
lina from the year 1902, when it 
was founded, to 1964. The resolu- 
tion follows: 

WHEREAS the General Edu- 
cation Board, founded by John 
D. Rockefeller, Sr., in 1902, 
terminated its activity in 1964 
after expending $324.6 million 
for "the promotion of educa- 
tion within the United States 
of America without distinc- 
tion of race, sex, or creed"; 
and 

WHEREAS both public and 
private schools, colleges, and 
universities in North Carolina 
were beneficiaries of the gen- 
erosity and the influence of 
this great philanthropic foun- 
dation ; and 

WHEREAS the incentive pro- 
vided by the General Educa- 
tion Board stimulated and en- 
abled North Carolina in the 
early decades of this century 



to organize and construct ele- 
mentary and secondary schools, 
to employ college personnel to 
train teachers, to strengthen 
both State and local supervis- 
ory services to schools, to in- 
crease and supplement teach- 
ers' salaries, to equip libraries 
and laboratories, to provide 
scholarships and fellowships 
for research and graduate 
study, to improve rural living 
through the establishment of 
"corn clubs" and "tomato 
clubs" as a part of comprehen- 
sive farm demonstration pro- 
grams, to improve the quality 
of medical education, and gen- 
erally to quicken the conscience 
of the State in behalf of edu- 
cation ; 

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT 
RESOLVED that the North 
Carolina State Board of Edu- 
cation record and publish its 
profound gratitude to the 
General Education Board for 
its significant and everlasting 
contribution to the educational 
life of this State. 



Tar Heel TV Teacher 
Gains Doctoral Title 

Paul W. Welliver of Greensboro, 
television teacher of the ninth- 
grade Physical Science Course for 
the State Department of Public In- 
struction since 1961, was awarded 
the doctoral degree in science edu- 
cation by Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity on Dec. 11, 1965. 

Dr. Welliver joined the State 
Television Education staff as a 
studio teacher after a year with 
the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear 
Studies as a traveling science 
teacher in North and South Caro- 
lina. A native of Pennsylvania, he 
previously taught in the public 
schools there. He is a graduate of 
Western Maryland College and re- 
ceived his master's degree from 
Pennsylvania State University. 



Choral Conductor Resigns 

Dr. Ewald V. Nolte has resigned 
as choral conductor for the North 
Carolina School of the Arts in 
Winston-Salem. He will be replaced 
by Philippe H. Buhler, a member 
of the music faculty at the School 
of the Arts who is teaching theory 
and composition. 

Dr. Nolte cited the press of 
duties in other activities as the 
reason for his resignation. He is 
director of the Moravian Music 
Foundation, conductor of the Sing- 
ers Guild of Forsyth County, and 
professor of history of music at 
Salem College. 

Buhler is a native of Thann, 
France, becoming a naturalized 
American citizen in 1956. Before 
going to Winston-Salem last fall 
he headed the music department at 
Gavilan College at Hollister, Calif. 



Noe Reviews Aspects 
Of Safety Education 

Safety education programs in 
the public schools cannot achieve 
maximum effectiveness unless they 
offer training in specific techniques 
for accident prevention, accord due 
consideration to basic human moti- 
vations and attitudes which are 
the groundwork for the develop- 
ment of habits of safety, and are 
well-coordinated and integrated 
with other phases of the school 
program. 

John C. Noe, supervisor of 
Driver and Safety Education, State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
stresses this triple aspect of safety 
education in an article, "Profes- 
sional Responsibility in Safety 
Education," featured in the No- 
vember-December issue of Safety, 
the professional journal published 
by the National Commission on 
Safety. 

Safety education programs which 
are not well-coordinated and inte- 
grated with other educational pro- 
grams may fail to exert sufficient 
effects on basic motivations and 
attitudes, Noe observes. On the 
other hand, those programs which 
neglect instruction and training in 
the specifics of accident prevention 
may fail to help students develop 
sufficient awareness of actual haz- 
ards. 

Industrial safety engineers and 
other safety specialists, he points 
out, have indicated the importance 
of a well-coordinated approach in 
safety education. They also have 
cited the lack of attention to safety 
training in other phases of school 
activities beyond the formal safety 
education program, Noe states. 



Fire Destroys Buildings 

Fire of undetermined origin de- 
stroyed two buildings on the old 
East Hyde High School campus at 
Engelhard around 3 a.m. on Janu- 
ary 4. The gymnasium and agri- 
cultural shop building burned to 
the ground. Both were empty but 
the shop building had been sched- 
uled for use as an adult education 
center. 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^Jbe Attaitieu Qeneial Ruled, . . 



Employment of Principals and Teachers; 
Revocation of Certificates. 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 
You call my attention to the amend- 
ment made to G. S. 115-145 at the 
1965 Session of the General Assem- 
bly. This amendment authorizes 
the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction to revoke the certificate 
of a teacher for certain causes 
stated in the section. You ask us 
to advise you if you can revoke a 
North Carolina certificate held by 
a teacher whose certificate in an- 
other state has been revoked. This 
teacher holds a valid certificate 
from this State and also held a cer- 
tificate in another state. The cer- 
tificate in the other state was 
revoked because of immoral or dis- 
reputable conduct, and, in fact, it 
has been made to appear that the 
teacher entered a plea of guilty to 
a crime involving moral turpitude. 
The pertinent part of G. S. 115- 
145 is as follows: 

"Persons whose certificates have 
been revoked by another state for 
immoral or disreputable conduct 
shall not be certificated in North 
Carolina, and it shall be the duty 
of the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction to notify all 
other states of any certificates 
which he shall revoke." 
You will recall that this matter 
was discussed in a personal con- 
ference, and we now advise you 
as we did at that time that you do 
have the authority to revoke this 
certificate held by this teacher in 
this State. The revocation will be 
based upon, and can be based upon, 
the fact that this teacher was con- 
victed in another state of a dis- 
reputable offense or an offense in- 
volving moral turpitude. As we 
understand the matter, the teacher 
entered a plea of guilty in the other 
state to a disreputable sex offense. 
We think there is no doubt but 
what you have the authority to re- 
voke the certificate but as a matter 
of conforming to constitutional 
requirements and due process of 
law you should obtain a certified 
copy of this conviction and notify 
the teacher concerned to appear 
on a certain date and show cause 
why his certificate should not be 
revoked. Attorney General, Janu- 
ary 10, 1966. 

FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Purchasing School Site From an Estate 
In which a Board Member is One of 
Several Heirs. 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 
In your letter of December 3, 1965, 
you asked to be advised as to the 
following question: 

"May a board of education 
purchase property for a school 
site from an estate in which 
a board member is one of 
several heirs of the estate and 
is the executor of the will in- 
volved?" 
G. S. 14-234 states the following: 
"Director of public trust con- 
tracting for his own benefit. 
— If any person, appointed or 
elected a commissioner or 
director to discharge any trust 
wherein the State or any 
county, city or town may be in 
any manner interested shall 
become an undertaker, or make 
any contract for his own bene- 
fit, under such authority, or be 
in any manner concerned or 
interested in making such con- 
tract, or in the profits thereof, 
either privately or openly, 
singly or jointly with another, 
he shall be guilty of a misde- 
meanor. Provided, that this 
section shall not apply to pub- 
lic officials transacting busi- 
ness with banks or banking 
institutions in regular course 
of business: Provided further, 
that such undertaking or con- 
tracting shall be authorized 
by said governing board." 
It is my opinion, therefore, that 
such purchase should not be made 
in light of the fact that the board 
member would have a direct pecu- 
niary interest in the purchase. 
Attorney General, December 6, 
1965. 



Moore School Dedicated 

North Moore High School, Moore 
county's $1,300,000 facility which 
opened in September, was dedicated 
on January 9. Dr. Amos Abrams of 
Raleigh, editor of the NCEA maga- 
zine and assistant to the NCEA 
executive director, was principal 
speaker. 

The school is the second in 
Moore's consolidation program. 



Recommendations May Affect 
School Athletic Programs 

The State Advisory Committee 
on School Athletics and Activities 
recently made three recommenda- 
tions relating to school athletic 
programs. They are being prepared 
for presentation to the State Board 
of Education for consideration. 

One proposal would permit a 
"physical conditioning week" for 
schools participating in interscho- 
lastic football prior to the opening 
of football practice. Noting the 
need for additional time to condi- 
tion players for the rigors of tackle 
football, the advisory committee 
recommendation stipulates that the 
emphasis should be on improving 
the physical condition of students 
to participate in the football pro- 
gram rather than on football ex- 
cellence. Activities would be limited 
to calisthenics, kicking, throwing, 
running, and similar exercises. 
They would be conducted in one-a- 
day periods, not to exceed two 
hours in length, for no more than 
six consecutive days. 

Another recommendation would 
change the age limitations for par- 
ticipation on a junior high school 
athletic team. At the present time 
the regulations say a student "who 
will become 17 years of age on or 
before April 1" of the school year 
cannot participate on a junior high 
team. The advisory committee rec- 
ommends that the age should be 
changed to "16 years." 

Feeling that a present interpre- 
tation, regarding players partici- 
pating in organized games after 
the completion of the high school 
schedule is too restrictive, the 
committee recommends its deletion 
from the regulations. The interpre- 
tation now reads: "Students shall 
not participate in any organized 
games after the above program 
has been completed. This means 
that a student shall not participate 
in an invitational type tournament 
or on an all-star type team which 
combines players from two or more 
teams or players from a school 
team and from some other source. 
Dressing and sitting on the bench 
shall be interpreted as participat- 
ing in the game." 

15 



LOOKING BACK 

In February issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 
The State Board of Education, 
meeting two hours following the 
Governor's inaugural address, ex- 
pressed by resolution its enthusi- 
astic approval for his stand on 
quality education. 

Five workshops in school plan- 
ning were held during February 
under the auspices of the Division 
of Superintendents of the NCEA, 
the North Carolina Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects, 
and the State Department of 
Public Instruction. 

Ten Years Ago, 1956 
In September, some 350 able 
young men and women will enter 
college on a four-year scholarship 
entirely paid for by a new agency 
in American education, namely, 
the National Merit Scholarship 
Corporation. 

About 6,000 children of elemen- 
tary school age die every year as a 
result of accidents, according to 
a recent report by the National 
Office of Vital Statistics. 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 
Headline: Governor Recom- 
mends Holding $2200-3100 Salary 
Schedule. 

Headline: Budget Commission 
Recommends $184,998,716 for Pub- 
lic Schools. 

School Food Service Associa- 
tion of North Carolina held its 
first annual convention in Win- 
ston-Salem, February 9-10. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1946 
Mrs. Anne W. Maley has been 
appointed to succeed Mrs. Lorine 
M. Moore as State Supervisor of 
the Child Feeding Program. 

On November 16, delegates of 
44 countries, meeting in London, 
gave final approval to a Constitu- 
tion for a United Nations Educa- 
tional, Scientific and Cultural Or- 
ganization. 

Twenty-Five Years Ago, 1941 
Many boards of education are 
drafting special personnel policies 
to provide leaves of absence to 
teachers and other school em- 
ployees called for military train- 
ing. 



N. C. Education Magazine, Raleigh Newspaper 
Honor State Education Agency's Top Officials 



North Carolina's three top State 
school officials, Dr. Charles F. Car- 
roll, J. Everette Miller, and A. C. 
Davis, were honored in recent 
issues of North Carolina Educa- 
tion, the professional journal pub- 
lished by the North Carolina Edu- 
cation Association. 

State Superintendent Carroll 
and Assistant Superintendent Mil- 
ler are pictured together on the 
cover of the magazine's October 
issue, and State Board of Educa- 
tion Controller Davis on the No- 
vember cover. 

By coincidence, Davis was also 
cited as "Tar Heel of the Week" 
by the Raleigh News and Observer 
in its Oct. 17 Sunday feature sec- 
tion. 

The NCEA magazine's October 
cover story emphasizes the able 
teamwork of Dr. Carroll and Miller 
in the formidably complex task of 
presiding over the programs and 
services of the gigantic Tar Heel 
public school system. 

"Dr. Carroll's actions, decisions, 
and leadership touch more people 
more often than do the actions of 
any other State official, with the 
possible exception of the Gover- 
nor," the article declares. It traces 
his lengthy career in public educa- 
tion, beginning in 1921 when he 
was teacher and coach in Vance 
County, through his terms as prin- 
cipal of schools in several sections 
of the State, and as superintendent 
of Swain County and High Point 
City schools, to his appointment as 
State Superintendent in 1952. 

Miller's thorough understanding 
of "all phases of North Carolina 
education" is cited and a summary 
of his professional career is given, 
from his service as teacher and 
principal in the Washington, N. C. 
public schools through several staff 
positions in the State Department 
of Public Instruction. 

In the November cover story, 
the writer surveys the wide-rang- 
ing responsibilities of the Control- 
ler and reviews Davis' career as 
a finance officer in the State's edu- 
cation agency, extending back to 
1936. 



Davis, described as "quiet and 
unassuming," is cited as the person 
"who knows more about the financ- 
ing of public education in North 
Carolina than any other one man." 

The News and Observer article 
also describes his key role in the 
State government and the diversity 
of his responsibilities, considerably 
augmented within the past two 
years by the establishment of the 
Department of Community Col- 
leges and rapidly increasing allo- 
cations of Federal funds. 

Davis has won the esteem of 
school administrators throughout 
the State and his professional col- 
leagues of the State staff, the 
article notes, "as a man they can 
depend on for a quick, definite, and 
accurate answer to any school fiscal 
question." 



New Building Under Way At 
Gaston Community College 

Ground was broken on December 
13 to start the construction of a 
new $1,225,000 technical-vocational 
education building at Gaston Col- 
lege. 

Sen. Sam J. Ervin, Jr., the 
State's senior representative to the 
United States Senate, and Con- 
gressman Basil L. Whitener were 
principal speakers at the cere- 
monies and turned the first shovels 
of dirt. Ray Craig, chairman of the 
college's board of trustees, presided 
and James H. Atkins, a trustee, 
presented spades to Sen Ervin and 
Rep. Whitener. 

The new structure will house 
what once was Gaston Technical 
Institute and the Gastonia Indus- 
trial Education Center. The two 
units merged with Gaston College 
under the State's community col- 
lege system on July 1 but could 
not become a physical part of the 
college because of the lack of a 
building. Both are now operating 
in the old Gaston Technical Insti- 
tute facilities on W. Franklin Ave. 
in Gastonia. The college campus is 
located off U. S. Highway 321, just 
outside Dallas. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



I IT 

7 / 
1:30/7 




dlcational 
Iress 
soc1 ation 

OF 
MERICA 



Norlh Carolina State Library 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 



BULLET 




a 



n Q 



©c 



MARCH 1966 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, NO. 7 




Education Board Proposes Uniform Remuneration 
Of Public School Student Teacher Supervisors 

The State Board of Education in 
February approved "in principle" 
a proposed plan for remuneration 
of public school teachers for service 
as supervising teachers in the stu- 
dent teaching program. 

At the March 3 meeting of the 
Board reactions received from 
presidents of colleges which would 
be involved and from city and 
county school superintendents 
were reviewed and found to be 
favorable. The Board instructed 
the Controller's Office to prepare 
a proposed budget for considera- 
tion in April. 

Under the proposed plan a super- 
vising teacher must hold a Class 
"A" or higher certificate in the 
field to be supervised ; have a mini- 
mum of two years experience teach- 
ing in the area, or level, to be 
supervised; have the recommend- 
ation of her superintendent, the 
recommendation of the appropriate 
college official, and the approval of 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction; and participate in a 
State-sponsored program of in- 
service preparation for supervising 
teachers and/or hold the Super- 
visor of Student Teacher's Certifi- 
cate. 

Remuneration in the amount of 
$50 for each student teacher super- 
vised would be paid by the State. 
The supervising teacher would be 
paid for only one full-time student 
at a time and for no more than two 
student teachers during one aca- 
demic year. The State compensation 
would be paid through the office of 
the superintendent in the regular 
budgetary manner and it would not 
be supplemented from any source. 

The student teaching program 
would have to be operated in accord- 
ance with guidelines and standards 
already set by the State Board of 
Education, and the program must 
be approved by the State Depart- 



ment of Public Instruction. Cost 
to the State would be around 
$680,000 for the 1967-69 biennium. 
Federal funds, under a Title V, 
ESEA, project would provide a co- 
ordinator for the State student 
teaching program and organize a 
Statewide cooperative program of 
in-service education for public 
school teachers engaged in the 
supervision of student teachers. 

In presenting the proposal to 
college presidents and school super- 
intendents for their reaction, Dr. 
J. P. Freeman, director of the 
Division of Professional Services 
for the State Department of Public 
Instruction, pointed out that stu- 
dent teaching is a significant part 
(Continued on page U) 

Hospitalized and Homebo 

Thirty-four of 50 Statewide posi- 
tions for teachers of hospitalized 
and homebound children, for which 
funds were provided by the 1965 
General Assembly, had been filled 
and approved by the State Board of 
Education by January 31, 1965. 

For the first time, legislative 
action last year made possible the 
employment of teachers for the 
hospitalized and homebound. An 
appropriation of $492,069 was pro- 
vided to hire as many as 50 such 
teachers under regulations adopted 
by the State Board of Education 
on August 5, 1965. Allotment of 
teachers, within the appropriation 
and positions available, is made 
on the basis of one teacher for 
approximately 12 eligible children. 

Physical and emotional conditions 
permitting, homebound children en- 
rolled in the program receive a 
minimum of two instructional ses- 
sions per week, with each session 
lasting from one to two hours. 
Children who are hospitalized may 
receive instruction more frequently 
with shorter sessions or may, at 



Summer Institutes 

Nearly 600 NDEA-funded 
institutes for teachers are 
scheduled to be held this sum- 
mer. In each instance partici- 
pants will receive stipends and 
dependency allowances. 

For a complete listing of 
scheduled institutes for all 
fields except mathematics and 
science, teachers may write or 
telephone Miss Shirley Rad- 
cliffe, U. S. Office of Education, 
Washington, D. C. 20202. 

Information on science and 
mathematics institutes may be 
secured from the Division of 
Pre-College Education, Nation- 
al Science Foundation, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 20550. Ask for 
publication number E-65-C-11. 



und Programs Total 34 

times, receive group instruction. 

The programs are administered 
by local boards of education with 
teachers under the supervision of 
the superintendent of the partici- 
pating school unit. Periodical re- 
ports are also submitted by the 
teachers to the principal of the 
school in which each child is, or 
should be, permanently enrolled. 
Credit is granted the pupils for 
all work satisfactorily completed. 

Administrative units with hospi- 
tal programs are Goldsboro City, 
Raleigh City, Granville County, 
Chapel Hill City, Durham City, and 
Charlotte-Mecklenburg. Those with 
homebound programs are Johnston 
County, Goldsboro City, Greensboro 
City, Burlington City, Winston- 
Forsyth, Whiteville City, Raleigh 
City, Durham County, Rutherford 
County, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, 
Tarboro City, Haywood County, 
Sampson County, Kinston City, and 
Shelby City. Columbus County 
shares in the Whiteville program 
and Lenoir County shares in the 
program at Kinston. 



(Excerpts from address at Newport Centennial celebration, January 29, 1966) 

People who will not remember their past will not long have a past worth remember- 
ing. It is good for a community of people to remember and to meditate upon their 
past and to use it as a benchmark from which they can take off in pursuit of even 
greater attainments. Out of such meditation can come a clearer and more promising 
contemplation of the future and out of calm and deliberate contemplation can come 
realization of the better life. . . . 

The best way to honor the past is to be a part of the present. I, therefore, would 
challenge each person within the sound of my voice to give consideration to ways 
and means of participating with renewed vigor in the affairs of the life with which 
we are confronted now and tomorrow. . . . Regardless of what comes into the life 
of this community, its success will always hinge around the degree and nature of 
livability that abounds here. 

. . . First, we must discover and strengthen anew the cornerstones which have 
served this community well during its first century. . . . 

You as a town were founded by industrious people who were adventuresome in 
spirit and persistent in their determination. They did not spend their time in search 
of security to the exclusion of the joys of work. This quality of faith and fortitude 
is basic in any endeavor. It is a quality which is born in the souls of men and it 
cannot be subdued by circumstances. It is the source of strength and ultimate great- 
ness and its destiny is success. . . . 

Another cornerstone in your history has been your attentivenes to churches and 
other means of religious expression. ... A community and a nation of churches and 
church-going people possess an asset which both strengthens and gives purpose to 
the lives of people. 

The story of your first century speaks frequently of business endeavors and adven- 
tures into the world of work and employment. ... To grow and to thrive, Newport 
and its environs must be alert to possibilities for providing good, stable employ- 
ment to those who could choose to live here. . . . The kind of employment made 
available in this community will influence the kind of people who will live with you 
and help re-shape your destiny. 

Another cornerstone . . . has been your insistence on good local government. . . . 
The extent to which we utilize, protect, and preserve this instrument of local determi- 
nation will predict the future of Newport and all other communities in America. 

... It must be observed that your past century has been attentive to schools and 
the means of education. . . . Good people, good churches, good jobs, good govern- 
ment — these — all of these — are dependent upon good schools. As our people are 
informed, as their insights are deepened, as their aspirations are kindled — good com- 
munities are launched and their future insured. 

The second major factor that must claim our attention as we contemplate the next 
century is recognition that communities cannot exist in isolation; they must become 
a part of and be responsible to the total world society. Some matters of concern to 
Newport, N. C, are of mutual concern to Newport, R. I., and to Newport, Ky. . . . 
Matters of peace, of national security, of preservation of ideas and ideals, of food, 
of health — these are overriding concerns that require the cooperative thought of all 
people everywhere. 

The third factor which we must consider in our quest for an ever greater century 
is attentiveness to the restlessness for change. We shall not be able to build a good 
community, put it in a glass cage, and preserve it just that way. Change is innate 
and inevitable. Our ability to anticipate and plan for the inevitable is continuously 
under scrutiny and examination. Our foresight in this realm of reality may well 
determine whether a community becomes a museum piece for the dead or a dwelling 
place for the living. . . . 

If the people of Newport and area want to prepare for the next century, then 
you must be prepared for whatever may come. This all-pervasive and sufficient prep- 
aration might well be founded within the character and traits of those who have 
lived here — people who were and are happy in a quiet way; people who were and 
are friendly in a natural way; people who were and are concerned about tomorrow 
in an intelligent way. 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication Issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
•t Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

Teachers are the indispensable 
people in our society. Because they 
are molding the minds of tomor- 
row's leaders, the hope for a 
better America really rests on 
their shoulders .... 

— President Lyndon B. Johnson 



A democracy of eighth grade 
graduates could man a calvary 
troop or even an infantry regi- 
ment, but it could not put an 
armored division in the field, an 
atomic submarine under the North 
Pole, or a SAC wing in the air. It 
could mine coal and cut lumber, 
but it could not provide the man- 
power for the twentieth-century 
system of banking and insurance. 
It could produce longshoremen 
but where woud it find computer 
programers? 

— B. J. Wattenberg, This U.S.A. 



Identifying pupils who have ad- 
justment problems is only part of 
the task. Attempting to discover 
the "why" is still another part of 
the same task. Before taking un- 
usual action regarding remedia- 
tion, ask yourself this question: 
do I set responsible goals and 
standards that will allow my 
pupils to adjust without continu- 
ally reverting to escape devices? 
— Glen Maynard, Kent State Uni- 
versity, Ohio. 



I urge you, as teachers, to intro- 
duce your students to the beauty 
of folk music. Through it they can 
begin to experience empathy for 
the striving, the struggling, and 
the desperation of the various 
groups that build our nation. But 
folk music also contains gaiety 
and laughter and self-made fun. 
It is a musical experience which 
has staying power and can result 
in a maximum of leisure time 
enjoyment. — Burl Ives 



Vol. XXX, No. 7 



J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 
V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 

MARCH, 1966 



In the evolution of our demo- 
cratic institutions this nation has 
developed an extraordinary fusion 
between idealism and realism, a 
help-others and take-care-of-our- 
selves attitude. These qualities 
pervade our country's institutions. 
They also mark our people's 
character. — William Proxmire 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



fyosi<fin<f Ahead . . . 



Forge may be used both as a 
transitive verb and an intransitive 
verb. Though its exact origin is 
uncertain, its usage and, in turn, 
its meaning is singularly restricted. 
Usually it means — as a transitive 
verb — to beat or hammer into 
shape; and — as an intransitive verb 
— to move ahead slowly. 

At the present, forge is an up- 
to-date, fashionable word not only 
in educational circles, but in other 
groups as well. Moreover, it is a 
positive and colorful word with 
connotations of solidity, hardwork, 
determination, action, permanence, 
and success. It is certainly an ap- 
propriate word in terms of the 
spirit underlying many local, state, 
and national efforts to provide 
better education for more and 
more students. Thousands of edu- 
cators and others across the Nation 
are now trying to hammer into 
shape educational programs which 
will assist increasing numbers of 
students, especially those who are 
economically and educationally de- 
prived. In almost all instances, 
these educational planners are 
moving ahead sloivly and often with 
difficulty. In a very real sense, 
therefore, the schools of North 
Carolina and the Nation are defi- 
nitely forging ahead. 

In forging new and improved 
educational programs in North 
Carolina, school leaders and others 
cooperating in such ventures are 
following practices long recognized 
as sound, some of which are de- 
manded by Federal agencies when 
these are involved. For example, 
focus is constantly centered on 
educational programs based on the 
needs of students. This has been 
true in North Carolina's highly 
successful approach to using NDEA 
funds; and is similarly true today 
as programs are being forged 
under the Elementary and Second- 
ary Education Act. Needs of stu- 
dents are carefully identified; edu- 
cational programs based on these 
needs are then projected; approval 
is sought from local, state, and 
federal authorities; and programs 
are initiated, administered, and 
finally evaluated. 

MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Virtues Involved 

Virtues of this approach are 
numerous, three of which seem 
particularly significant — 

• Improved educational programs 
must be centered on students and 
their needs. Acquisition of facili- 
ties, instructional materials, ad- 
ditional personnel, and the like may 
be the instruments through which 
these needs are satisfied, but must 
never be the point of departure for 
making progress. 

• Formulating educational pro- 
grams at the local level with the in- 
volvement of those most. concerned 
is the soundest approach yet dis- 
covered for guaranteeing commit- 
ment to school improvement. Ham- 
mering programs into shape slowly 
and often with difficulty provides 
many opportunities for forging 
new and dynamic partnerships — 
between school leaders and other 
community leaders, between educa- 
tional personnel at the local level 
and those at the state and national 
level, between local administrators 
and the instructional staff, between 
local administrators and school 
board members, and between school 
personnel and the school's primary 
clientele — students and parents. 
The creation of such partnerships 
and the strengthening of such 
relationships constitute one of the 
State's greatest opportunities for 
developing better educational pro- 
grams for more students. 

• Evaluation of educational pro- 
grams in terms of purposes has 
long been North Carolina's way of 
forging ahead. More than ever, this 
approach is gaining recognition 
and, in terms of the projects initi- 
ated under ESEA, emphasis on 
evaluation is now mandatory. Tar 
Heel educators welcome the op- 
portunity to learn more about 
effective evaluation as educational 
programs evolve with the aid of 
Federal funds and the accompany- 
ing mandate that such programs 
be evaluated. 

Hammering into shape is part 
of forging ahead, and this process, 
to be successful, implies quite 
strongly the need for — 



JLoGSuusUf to. Jdea/iM, 

Columnist Sydney J. Harris 
recently pointed out that "obsoles- 
cense of knowledge," especially in 
scientific fields, is changing the 
whole idea of what constitutes a 
"good" education. He says we must 
"learn how to learn." 

Dr. Arnold Ducoffee, director of 
Georgia Tech's School of Aerospace 
Engineering, says the obsolescence 
of knowledge is the reason engine- 
ering schools today stress the 
"philosophical" elements in science 
rather than the "mechanical" — not 
how to do something, but why some- 
thing is true. By learning the rea- 
sons behind phenomena, we can 
cope with changing conditions. 

In the past the average man 
changed his job three times during 
his lifetime. We are told that in 
the future he may have to change 
his vocation three times during his 
lifetime. Unless he "learns how to 
learn," the specialist may become 
a dropout from the economic com- 
munity. 



• Understanding youth in a 
modern world — their needs, their 
ambitions, their limitations, and 
their possibilities. 

• Educational leaders whose pre- 
paration, experience, and vision 
enable them to see where others do 
not see. 

• A well-informed citizenry 
whose knowledge breeds enthusi- 
asm for cooperation in formulating 
improved programs in education. 

• Knowing what learning is of 
most value. 

• Creative, imaginative ideas; 
hard work, patience, determination ; 
and a willingness to learn by shar- 
ing. 

• Understanding the nature of 
change and when change is desir- 
able. 

Forge is an excellent word for 
this age. Somehow it seems to 
symbolize what educators and 
other citizens are striving so earn- 
estly to accomplish — the develop- 
ment of educational programs 
which have increasing meaning for 
all students. 



1 



Advancement School Develops Remedial Reading 
Handbook Based on Research, Clinic Experience 

niques, and philosophies of rem- 



The language arts staff at the 
North Carolina Advancement 
School has prepared a remedial 
reading handbook which is avail- 
able to interested schools. It is 
the first of several publications to 
evolve from the Advancement 
School's primary effort — practical 
research into methods of combat- 
ing underachievement. The rem- 
edial reading handbook was chosen 
as the first publication because 
language skills, reading in parti- 
cular, are necessary to all other 
academic pursuits. 

A majority of teachers and 
school administrators who visit 
the Achievement School list read- 
ing as the most urgent problem in 
their own schools. Also, the read- 
ing clinic at the Advancement 
School has received hundreds of 
inquires about its program. 
Index to Problems 

In 1964 the average high school 
senior in North Carolina was one 
and two-thirds grades behind the 
national norm in reading ability. 
Since the underachieving eighth- 
grade boys studying at the Ad- 
vancement School come from all 
geographical areas and socio- 
economic classes throughout the 
State, they represent an index of 
the problems of underachievers in 
the total public school system. 
Exhaustive testing and research 
has revealed that language dif- 
ficulties are their most common 
problem. 

After much research and experi- 
mentation, the Advancement 
School found that rigid or set 
courses are impractical because 
they tend to reach only a few 
students. Therefore, the handbook 
is not an inflexible prescription of 
classoom procedures. Rather, it 
contains detailed information on 
the diagnosis and treatment of 
specific reading ills. It also sug- 
gests ways of overcoming many 
of the difficulties schools have 
experienced with remedial pro- 
grams in the past. 

The handbook contains an ex- 
tensive annotated bibliography — 
referring teachers to appropriate 
tests, materials, equipment, tech- 



edial reading instruction. 

Information concerning the 
handbook is being sent directly 
to the schools in the State, along 
with detailed instruction as to 
how interested schools may put 
the program into effect. 



Education Board . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 
of the total preparation for teach- 
ing. Also, that one of the most 
direct ways of improving teacher 
education in general and student 
teaching in particular is through 
the selection and preparation of a 
corps of well-qualified teachers who 
would induct all prospective teach- 
ers into the teaching profession. 
He noted that in recent years stu- 
dent teaching has moved from col- 
lege laboratory schools to the public 
schools. 

Often good teachers hesitate to 
accept the responsibility of work- 
ing with student teachers. It is 
hoped the added remuneration by 
the State will encourage good 
teachers to accept this responsi- 
bility willingly and also encourage 
many to return to college for fur- 
ther study. "Since supervising 
teachers are chosen because they 
are judged to be superior teachers, 
they are teachers whom the State 
should try to keep in the schools," 
Dr. Freeman said. 

The establishment of a uniform 
program of remuneration should 
bring order to the present chaotic 
situation in which some supervising 
teachers are not paid at all and 
others are paid as much as $50 
per student teacher, Dr. Freeman 
added. Faculty morale is especially 
affected in schools which accept 
student teachers from institutions 
of higher learning on different 
financial bases. 

Besides improving the prepara- 
tion of teachers in the State, Dr. 
Freeman points out, supervising 
teachers are contributing to the 
State by rendering a specialized 
service. "To establish a uniform 
system of payment for this service 
would be to recognize the State's 
obligation to them," he said. 



Library Book Projects 
Under Title II Approved 

On February 23 Miss Cora Paul 
Bomar, supervisor of the Library 
and Instructional Materials Serv- 
ices for the Department of Public 
Instruction, reported that 118 
ESEA Title II projects, totaling 
$786,370.91, had been approved. 
They had been submitted by 117 
administrative units, and 20 others 
had been received and were being 
considered on the above date. 

Title II funds are for the acquisi- 
tion of library books and other 
printed materials, and $2,435,404 
has been allocated to North Caro- 
lina for the current year. 

"The strength of Title II lies in 
the emphasis placed on identifying 
existing school library resources 
and other instructional materials 
and in the emphasis on projecting 
long-range plans for making read- 
ily available to students resources 
needed for effective learning, "Miss 
Bomar said. 

Quotations lifted from some of 
the applications indicated many of 
the things the required study of 
existing resources and future needs 
has revealed to the local units. 
Among these were — 

"Our library needs more classics 
to prepare college bound students 
and give them an understanding of 
classical literature." 

"Our school enrollment is made 
up of mostly rural children. Many 
of them are from homes of tenant 
farmers or from low income fami- 
lies where they have very few, if 
any, magazines, newspapers, books 
or other reading matter. The only 
reading material or sources these 
children have access to are found 
in the school; therefore, we need 
to build up our library and library 
resources to give these children 
opportunity to read, to learn, to 
question, to think." 



TITLE I 

By February 22 the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction 
had approved 104 Title I, ESEA, 
projects submitted by 101 school 
units and calling for the expen- 
diture of $26,994,922.18 during 
the current fiscal year. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Four ESEA Title III Projects Are Approved 



Four North Carolina Title III, 
ESEA, projects have been ap- 
proved and are getting under way. 
This title authorizes Federal as- 
sistance to local schools "in pro- 
viding vitally needed educational 
services not available in sufficient 
quantity or quality and in develop- 
ing or establishing exemplary 
school programs to serve as 
models for regular programs." 

The Department of Public In- 
struction evaluates proposed proj- 
ects and forwards them to the 
U. S. Commissioner of Education, 
who has the authority for ap- 
proval. Some $1.8 million was 
allocated for Title III projects in 
this State during the current year. 
Eleven were submitted, of which 
four were approved. By the end 
of the second submission period, 
February 9, 22 additional projects 
had been received. Awards will be 
announced in mid-April. The third 
and final submission period for the 
current fiscal year ends May 25. 

Buncombe County 

The Buncombe County Board of 
Education has received a $38,294 
grant for the current year. An 
Audiovisual and Library Center 
located in a former school build- 
ing is delivering instructional 
materials to 33 schools in 600 
square miles, repairing and cir- 
culating 16 mm films, processing 
library books for seven schools, 
assisting all schools in ordering 
instructional materials, and pro- 
viding facilities for in-service 
education. Approximately 20 per- 
cent of the program planned is 
being accomplished. The Federal 
grant will enable the schools to 
expand existing services sooner 
than otherwise possible. The 
number of teachers expected to 
participate in in-service activities 
is 314. The project is expected to 
serve 20,295 students, 66 preschool 
children, and 150 adult education 
students. 

Wayne County 

The Wayne County Board of 
Education has received a $40,915 



grant for a center to provide pro- 
grams for the classroom teacher, 
for academically talented and 
college-bound students, and for 
culturally disadvantaged and 
economically deprived youths and 
adults. It is to innovate ideas and 
exemplify programs for training 
teachers in service. Planning will 
proceed through surveys, visits, 
questionnaires, conferences, and 
consultations. A staff will be ap- 
pointed to coordinate ideas in 
regard to the location of the 
center, to find out what equip- 
ment and facilities are available 
and what are needed, and to 
evaluate the project. The size of 
the group to be served is estimated 
at 83,000 children and adults. 

Robeson County 

Robeson County Board of Edu- 
cation has received a $29,100 
grant. Of the 15,442 students en- 
rolled in the county school system, 
69.3 percent come from families 
with annual incomes of $2,000 or 
less. Sixty percent are Indian, 20 
percent Negro, and 20 percent 
white. The problems are to in- 
crease the competence of teachers, 
raise the educational achievement 
of students, and cultivate an 
interest in education among and 
offer cultural opportunities to 
both children and adults. A plan- 
ning director will be appointed, 
educational and cultural author- 
ities will be consulted, and proj- 
ects in operation will be visited 
and studied. The number of per- 
sons to be served is estimated at 
89,102 teachers, students, and 
adult residents. 

Nash and Edgecombe 

Nash and Edgecombe county 
and Rocky Mount and Tarboro 
city school systems have received 
$30,530 for a cooperative survey 
to determine what the school 
needs are, where they are, and 
what innovative and exemplary 
programs will be observed, investi- 
gated, studied, and evaluated. The 
survey will include such infor- 



State Agency Seeks 15th 
Title V, ESEA, Project 

The State Board of Education, at 
its February 3 meeting, approved 
a fifteenth project under Title V, 
PL 89-10, of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act which is 
designed to help state education 
agencies improve their services to 
local administrative units. 

The new project will provide re- 
sources to improve accounting ser- 
vices and provide more effective 
collection and dissemination of 
fiscal information. In the applica- 
tion for Federal funds, the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction pointed 
out that there is an urgent need 
for up-to-date methods for process- 
ing fiscal reports and information 
received from the 169 administra- 
tive school units. Modern account- 
ing machinery and automated 
methods are needed so that infor- 
mation received from the school 
units can be handled on a current 
basis — making it possible to pro- 
cess allotments and deposit of 
funds without undue delay. 

It was also pointed out that, with 
readily available fiscal information, 
the local boards of education will 
not be handicapped and restricted 
in the expansion of present pro- 
grams and in adequate planning 
and development of new programs. 

Funds requested for the remain- 
der of the current fiscal year total 
$41,500 and include the replacement 
of a 15-year-old bookkeeping ma- 
chine with up-to-date equipment. 



mation as the extent of under- 
achievement among pupils, the 
amount of cultural and self- 
improvement opportunities offered 
through home, school, and com- 
munity, the extent to which 
poverty, race, or social status has 
interfered with educational or 
cultural development, and the 
identity of persons with physical, 
mental, or emotional handicaps. 
The number of persons estimated 
to be served is 47,692. 



MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Study Shows Too Few Physics Teachers 
Adequately Prepared, Classes Increasing 



Not enough high school physics 
teachers are being prepared and 
most of those teaching physics in 
North Carolina schools are in- 
adequately prepared. 

Meanwhile, the number of 
schools teaching physics has in- 
creased during a period when the 
total number of high schools in 
the State has decreased through 
consolidation programs. 

Those aie some of the findings 
in a'study prepared by Dr. Norman 
D. Anderson of North Carolina 
State University and John M. 
Goode, science consultant with 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction, for presentation at 
the Fourth Annual Conference on 
Recent Advancements in Physics. 

The report indicates that during 
the last school year there were 
517 high schools in which 520 
teachers taught a total of 538 
classes. "It is clear," the report 
states, "that the usual pattern is 
that of one physics teacher and 
one class in physics in almost 
every high school in the State." 
Teacher Qualifications 

Anderson and Goode, in study- 
ing the qualifications of physics 
teachers in North Carolina, 23 
percent of whom are women, dis- 
covered — 

• Their undergraduate physics 
preparation ranged from rio phys- 
ics to 71 semester hours. 

• Five percent of these teachers 
have never had a college physics 
course, and three-fourths of these 
teachers with no college physics 
were graduated within the last 
five years. 

• Sixty-five percent had no 
physics course beyond the first 
year or beginning physics. 

• Only 30 percent of the physics 
teachers have taken one physics 
course since their undergraduate 
training. 

• Thirteen percent have not had 
a course in physics since World 
War II and 38 percent have not 
had a course within the last ten 
years. 

• Only 38 percent of the physics 
teachers have taken a course in 
calculus. 



Number Prepared 

This investigation also indicates 
that in 1962-63 only three physics 
teachers were prepared in the 21 
institutions of higher learning 
among the 35 in North Carolina 
which prepare science teachers. 
In 1963, according to State Depart- 
ment certification figures, no 
teacher was actually certified with 
an area of specialization in phys- 
ics. In this same year, however, 
teaching certificates were issued 
to 78 individuals in science, 52 in 
biology, two in chemistry, and 
eight in general science. 

Anderson and Goode's study 
cites a research report issued 
recently by the National Edu- 
cation Association in which data 
are presented to the effect that 
499 physics teachers were pre- 
pared in the United States in 1964 
and 584 in 1965. In commenting on 
these statistics, Anderson and 
Goode remarked : "Considering 
that there are about 12,000 teach- 
ers in the United States teaching 
one or more classes of physics, 
and assuming a modest rate of 
turnover of 10 percent per year, 
we can see that we are preparing 
only about one-half the needed 
number of new physics teachers 
each year." 

Physics in High School? 

Opinions and data relative to 
the feasibility of teaching physics 
in high school are somewhat con- 
flicting, according to Anderson 
and Goode, and have been over 
the years. A recent study at Brown 
University involving 179 students 
studying physics conceded that 
there was no significant difference 
in the achievement in college 
physics of these groups except 
that "probably the conclusion is 
justified that girls who have 
studied no physics in secondary 
schools do less well in physics 
than do others at Brown Univer- 
sity." 

What of the Future ? 

"In view of such findings as 
these," Anderson and Goode re- 
ported, "the future course of high 
school physics in North Carolina 



Rockingham College Holds 
Groundbreaking Ceremony 

Groundbreaking ceremonies, to 
signal the start of construction, 
were held on the site of the Rock- 
ingham Community College on Jan- 
uary 12. 

Welsford Bishopric of Leaks- 
ville, chairman of the college 
trustees, presided at the 11 a.m. 
program and then turned the sym- 
bolic first spade of dirt. President 
Gerald James participated on be- 
half of the administrative staff. 

A full-scale instructional pro- 
gram is to start in the fall, 
Bishopric said. The first two build- 
ings are expected to be ready for 
use in September and another two 
are scheduled for completion by 
next January. 

Construction contracts total $2,- 
118,263. The four initial structures 
on the 150-acre campus, located 
near Wentworth, will be a class- 
room building, a laboratory build- 
ing, shop, and library. Future 
plans include an administration 
building, student center, gymnasi- 
um, and auditorium-arts building. 

Sources of funds include a $1.25 
million bond issue approved by 
Rockingham County voters in No- 
vember of 1963 by a 7-to-l majori- 
ty; $500,000 from the State, and 
$400,000 from the Higher Educa- 
tion Facilities Act. 



seems to lie in one of the follow- 
ing areas of action : 

• "Continue to teach physics in 
the 500 plus high schools with 
the teachers who are available; 

• "Drop physics from the cur- 
riculum except in those schools in 
which a qualified physics teacher 
is available — qualified to mean 
one who has a minimum of 18 
semester hours of physics, cal- 
culus, and at least one physics 
course during the past five years; 

• "Emphasize physics within 
the school's present framework 
with stress on educational tele- 
vision, filmed courses, and pro- 
grammed materials; and plan new 
organizational patterns which en- 
courage traveling physics teachers 
and which permit county-wide or 
regional summer schools." 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Brown Sees No Immediate Threat of Shortage 
In Bus Drivers; System In Need Of Review 



"There is no statewide threat of 
a shortage of school bus drivers. 
However, the time is approaching 
when we must take a realistic look 
at our entire school transportation 
system." 

Those were the words of C. C. 
Brown, director of the Division of 
Transportation for the Department 
of Public Instruction, when asked 
to comment on recent news reports 
that the Rowan County school unit 
feared a shortage of drivers for 
the 1966-67 school year. 

The Rowan news stories resulted 
from a report by Frank Bostian, 
assistant county school superinten- 
dent, to the county school board. 
He was quoted as saying the num- 
ber of students enrolled in the 
special training course to prepare 
them for the post of school bus 
driver has dropped 50 percent. He 
reportedly attributed at least part 
of the problem to the $1.25 per 
hour paid to part-time workers in 
poverty programs, an unfavorable 
comparison to the $30 monthly paid 
school bus drivers — around 75 
cents an hour. 

Chief Competitor 

Brown pointed out that in some 
instances the schools themselves 
are their own chief competitor — 
through the Distributive Educa- 
tion program. One city school sys- 
tem recently reported that 30 Dis- 
tributive Education pupils made an 
average of $133 per month. Brown 
also pointed out that more and 
more part-time jobs are becoming 
available for students — in stores, 
service stations, etc. — which do not 
carry the heavy responsibility of 
driving a school bus. 

More Trips 

Aside from the small monetary 
incentive for becoming a school bus 
driver, many school administrators 
point out that consolidation has 
created other problems. The day of 
union schools — where pupils from 
grades 1-12 are housed under one 
roof or, at least, in one central area 
— is fast disappearing. Large con- 
solidated elementary, junior high, 



and senior high schools mean more 
bus trips to pick up and deliver 
pupils. Usually it means elementary 
children are the first to be picked 
up in the morning and the last to 
be taken home in the afternoon. 

Some schools have met this latter 
problem by giving their high 
school bus drivers a free last period 
in the day. This gives them an 
hour's start toward the elementary 
schools where the children are 
normaly excused an hour earlier 
than high school students. The 
driver delivers the elementary chil- 
dren to their homes and returns to 
high school to pick up his fellow 
students. 

Cost is More 

The system costs the local unit 
more in operating costs because 
each bus makes more trips. How- 
ever, the same buses are used — 
meaning no additional capital in- 
vestments. 

While this system has proved 
beneficial for the youngsters being 
transported and gets the bus driver 



home before dark, it usually means 
the driver must miss out on some 
of the normal school activities. It 
can mean taking one less course, 
non-participation in such things as 
physical education classes, or miss- 
ing a study period and having to do 
all of his homework at night. 

Local Supplement 

Some school systems are attempt- 
ing to meet their driver problems 
by supplementing the State pay for 
school bus drivers. However, Brown 
said, many educators feel that the 
day is approaching when each 
school administrative unit must 
have two sets of bus drivers — and 
more buses — or look beyond the 
high school student ranks for 
drivers. 

Non-Student Drivers 

Already some states are using 
non-student drivers without a great 
deal of increased cost. In Florida 
80 percent of the school bus drivers 
are housewives. In several other 
states personnel such as school 
cafeteria workers and maintenance 
people are allowed to "moonlight" 
as school bus drivers. 



Half of Tar Teel Pupils Travel on Buses 

More than half of the students attending North Carolina's public 
schools last year rode there on 9,001 buses, the nation's largest school 
bus fleet financed mainly by State funds; they traveled a total of 
60,572,320 miles. 

Statistics contained in "Public School Transportation Data, 1964- 
65," the annual report issued by the State Board of Education Con- 
troller's Office, show that while the total annual mileage increased 
nearly 1.7 percent over the previous year's total, the cost to the State 
decreased 3.6 percent to $9,936,675. The State's expenditure per bus 
(including replacements) was $1,103.95, or 5.1 percent below the 1963- 
64 figure, and just 24 cents more than the cost recorded five years 
earlier. 

The average school bus transported 66 pupils daily and traveled 37 
miles, and 41 percent of the buses made two or more trips each day. 
The average number of miles traveled daily per bus ranged from 
55.1 in Currituck County to 29.5 in Rowan. 

Counties operating the largest numbers of regular buses were Guil- 
ford (268), Mecklenburg (267), Wake (245), Robeson (244), and 
Johnston (201). The average number per administrative unit was 
just over 90. 

Summary data for the five-year period 1960-61 through 1964-65 
show an increase of 7.3 percent in the number of buses operated and 
7.7 percent in the number of pupils transported daily, while the total 
mileage increased more than 9 percent. 



MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



SO 



z 
o 

< 



ui 

O 3 

— 1 (r> 

-J 

o 



< 
> 

£ 

a. 

Q 
Z 

< 

u 



a. 
>■ 

CQ 
in 

a* 

LU 

X 
U 
< 



O 

>- 

a. 

3 

LU 

Z 






rtMOVMOOClfllCO 
t- QO kO (C V 00 C CD tO 






<CNO»NO)OOH 



iflcoMt-ooooseoto 
co^t-oooo»-icoeo<M 

MNNNNNNWW 







bo S3 o 


>> 


i 

s 






s -~ ■** 


Si 








m 


o 


-o 


>> 


tS 1 -2 


s 

0) 


o 


<u 


^ 


3 >>£ 


CO 







C 4- 

a. -o 

2 5 

|l 
So 

1=1 

II 

a. 
a. 

3 

s 1 

E S 

u *. 

o c 



j: 3 
</> O 



t-00 010HM«^W 

ffi O Ci Ci © Ol ff; C) Oi 



Pi 0) 

O "2 

.S as 

aS ^ 

cj o 

3 a) 



< 

is 

go 

< Z ^ 

w I < 

- U uj 

H- < >" 

tt UI .,. 

O *Z z 

z £ 1 

>- 29 > 

a S O 

S i o 

OS Q "- 

< Z "J 

Si < s 

E i < 

3 2* 

Q I— < 

< ffc W 

S2E 

u. vi n 

n ui O 

° o z 

£1 g 

| o 



5 a 



:£>• 






lOOJ«OH01O>Nt-M 

f NOX'tNlOOlH 



iHOQOt-WOKCON 
OOiOiONO^rtfli 



HtOM^iOMNiOO 
(COHOiONiON^ 1 
N.-tCOOJi-HCO^iOOO 



C-00fl)OHN«1 , »0 
LQir3LQC0(C<£>e£CS(£> 

A0)©O>O)OO9)O> 



NOOM'l'WHOSO 
W05O103HHNNUS 



CO l> O W N US lO tO lO 
lOCOMi-i'^'COC-i-iiO 

HNNNN NNCOO) 



COOOLOCOtDNWSOi-H 

OONM'O'MtOt-rH 



NNt-OKMOOlOH 

NiOOOOt-HHHTf 
OJOHHOHHWM 



C-QOCROHNCO^IO 
CSClCSGiOCiOCiCS 



as i> i 



o CN 



T3 *T O 

^ & » 

bo S X 

O 

bflT3 a, 



cj 



co 
co 
C7> 



■** — 

g o 

I O 

CO 

CG +J 

CO Sh 

a3 O 



as ,3 -a 
s o s 

o « 

s >> 

14 O ^ 

v. 'O 

* 3°§ 



Si 

o 



as co 
cu a> 

Si JO 

p^ 



,2 o 

a> o 

■>* 

0) C 
3 05 

CO 
i-l Sh 

co o> 

OJ ,3 

4) 
CD "^ 

cj ^_ 
3 O 
T3 o 

P. CO 



0> O 
CD M 

rC CO 

^ "ty 

b| 

"v S 



0) aS 
aS .2 

§H 

rC CO* 

CO cy 

^3 



<3J S >5 

aS aS o 

^ ^ ° 

cs ; a) 

2^ to 



■c o 
% ° 

a> o 



as «y 

CO 



0) 



r« r? 



aS +j 
a> s-i 
>> o 

cy ^ 



Si 
c3 
T3 42 






O 

If 

O CO o 

S ffl S 

c 

CQ 



Si 

o 



CP 

. CO 

to aS 

Si cu 

01 Si 

-a 2 

cj C 

oS * rt 

CU 

^2 o> 
o 

^3 



a y 



a; ^ 

C OS 
cu 

cu 

0) i3 

> 

o 

,-> cu 

CM cj 
t- 3 

t> "8 

"^ o 

>? ft 
p. 
a co 

3 Si 
co CU 



bfl S 

.2 o 

bo^ 

~ cu 

CU Si 

.2 % 

- 0> 

rt co 

CO OS 

I CU 

co 5 

OS cj 



p.— 

ft CO 
3 Si 
CO cu 

fe <*{ 

> CJ 
CU oS 
S CU 

CD 

^§ 

. ^5 

CO CJ 
CU CO 

bo 

CD >> 
S Si 
O c3 

"I 

OS CD 

.2 2 

~ CD 

2^ 



CJ CD 

CO 

co 03 

OS cu 

Si 

H^> CJ 



C75 

CO >a 

CU P 

^3 P 

CJ 3 

03 co 
CU 



~i o> 

o c 
o 

O rG 



rj< co -+J 



T3 
CD 

^2 oo 
03 

cu 

Si 
CJ 



bo 

o3 
T3 • 

C 

o 



X 3 

■p "-i 

Si 

<< o> 

o> CO 



.So 
o 

o> o 

>, CD 

o 
ft — 

23 

CU 3 
CD & 

£.2 
+» £ 

o O 



■h -a o 



3.S 
o^= 
3 

— ' T3 
- 3 
CU oS 
bo 

5 >,^ 

3 Si 

cu as w 

cj +J o3 

S- 3 ,3 

cu o> 

P S co 

CU Si 

CO rZ CU 

•2 CD X 

H as 

i^H CU 

CO O 
CO^- 

to o 

CO bOrC 

Ol c CJ 

H.S (D 



3 
CD .2 

CD ~ 

-° 2 

-P2 p 
co 

Q, Si 

*-* cu 
p3 



OS 

co t|H 

? xs 
bo gj 

£ 3 



O oS 



M Si 

CU ft 

'O -, 

oS ra 

S ? 

qj bo 



o> 



5 s 

5 r3 
Q, OS 

.2 

3 si 

03 oS 

o 

.2^3 
iO Si 

^£ 

p!5 



S 53 

CO ^5 
3 ® 

8 ^ 

O CO 

>>2 



OS CD 

• H » J 

^ a i 

J-a 

-S 2 ; 

■^ ft i 

T3 » I 
3 rt 
OS 

+J cu 
3 o r 

CU 3 
CJ r^« 

« 2 

» P" 

CO to 



X3 



CU CD 

CJ — 



2 ^ 

S- o3 
P 



fe a -s « - s 



"C S bo 

o-ofi 

2-3 >> 

H tofl 
3 

ui y -p 

?. bo co 

£ CD 

H S o> 
cj oS 



cu 'C 
•3, cu 
hO o> 
3 3 
m 4- 

. CO 

3^ 

cj oS 
cu cu 

P Si 
co bo 



Si 




o 




4-1 




cu 




^o 




3 




m 




o> 




3 




3 


1/1 




Si 




n> 


o 


r3 

CJ 

03 




cu 




■M 


o 




o 


>, 


A 


Si 


CJ 


crt 


CJ 


-M 



CD CU 

& g 

cu*" 
i3 o 

0> J2 
«H to 

o * 

** cu 

tT.fc 

<J CD 
P 

m 



U T3 
O 3 

^2 I 

CJ T3 
CD 

•r-> -+J 
O CO 
3 O) 
CO cj 

0> 
-§ bo 



25^ 



b!) 


CJ 


3 


,S 




43 


Si 




OS 


-3 


a 


CJ 


CJ 
Si 


3 


P 


rs 



co c 

"o bo 

CO £ 

-2X! 

3 * 
P co 
OS .2 

.a-s 

2 s 
5 2 

O CU CU 

25 i of 

CD .CD § 

ill 



&H 2 



CO 

00 Si OS 

«M OS CD 

o p > 

Sh CD CD 

( PHQ Sh 

'«M CD C 



m <h <D j3 o 



3 e 



13 O 

3 

2^ 

2 I 

os e 



w +3 43 

2 w 2 

O 3 

•i 0) Sh 

> 43 CO 



& 



C75 



CD S 
■3 tVQ 



So H 
« <o -2 

CD a) „ 
33 CJ iO 

S* cu 

co 3 3 
aS O CD 

i*s s 



O 3 o 

2°S 

§ 3°^ 

10 .2 o 

=0 2 35 

B So 

•r4 P OS 

OS CD ij 

3 Sh 

2 bo 2 

w 2 O 

O c « 

O ->J 

>zr Sh 3 

m CU CU 

43 33 3 

rt bo cu 

5 33 '3 



cj te 

3-2 



p 



w 



T3 13 
CD 3 

T3 aS 
CD 

CD ^ 

3 & 

O 

o o 
«•§ 

iH CQ 



S o> 

« cu 
3 o) 

8 c 

Q) O) 

co c 
O 

P 03 
4J CU 

Sh 

>><2 
2 » 

« 33 



O Sh 3 

oS O 

CD 43 CJ 

bO 3 „ 



Si 

o 

33 



•2S 
s a 

CD ' rt 
* CD 
«M 3 

O .2 



3 3 

O oS 

co 2 

3 CD 

CJ CD 

O Sh 

44 [ih 



O 

t- 2 

t-h; co 



CD 



S p. 2 



4J 

2 « 

P Sh 
co cc3 

ftj* 



3 33 

.2 >> 2 

3 i-h OS 

2 CD CD 

'S 43 43 

•2 OS _ 

Q = o 

CT O 
CD ,2 ^ 

+3 as co 



33 o 

>\ 

CD 43 
3 33 
3 bo 



cu * 

p 



oS x3 
co •>-! 

— 33 
CD « 

Sh 

2 ^ 

3^ 3 

>> o 

Si >> 

o 
43 
co CD 

33:2 



o V 
cj 



-3 

O 

3 
O 



3 

i 



"3 "■ 



rH <J> 



•■ 



• t-o 

t COIN 



i i it 

I of, 



- 



«■* 

CO <J> 

coco 



coco 

ICO"* 



COCO 



i « >,' ! L 43 
— o 
co 

-'' 03 O 

. ... ^ . 

: cu 

-; 43 
: : • « "■> 



I 

m 
o 



to 
ad 

LU 

X 

u 

< 



O 



Q. 

t/» 

O 

Z 
< 

Q 
Z 
< 



to 

O 

i- 
< 



i m 0) 

o c S 



HHWNHHNNHHNIONHNH r-l 



Cii0^i , COCOrHC-COGOcOCJS10rH'«#C T i5D t- 
Ol -3« WCOHH NHCOHCJkO 

i-H co 



■ »fl(MN»0»OC-C0M01>0i0^0lO co 

St- HPJH rH rH CM rH 






■o 



•SB* 8 



H 



01 a 

P 3 



a ° a w '"a 



i^mWhlBMjSSWiHaiwtoO 



CD 

2 



o 



£.2 

«/> u 
z < 

Q z 

r- < 

< 

O < 

o z 

_. S2 -J 

Z O 

1 O <* 



t/» 



2 



tn 

Z 

o 

Of 



< 



S « ® 

P » CO 



» 0> 

: p. S 

ftO« 3,5 



S-S 

W 43 

° 2 

S O 



"« 2 S 



T3 
3 
03 

3 

s 

a) cu 
cu > cu 

r- cu 

" 0) £ 

43 



3 O 
aS W 

S 3 

o .5 

f* 
Si 

O p 



*? O 









•fh <->, cO 

R i 



s 
o 
o 2 '-J3 

O S B 
tn H i 

bo o 

0) bO .rH 

o c 

C/2 T3 cS 



i a> 

c « 

> 3 

02 O 

1 c 

'3 s - 1 



(V -C 
(V 



(M 



a 



8 « 

O ^, 



o S 

3 B 
■5 ° 

o o> 

p, ^ 

a 

s 



to 



p T3 

C ea 



bo §} 

C to 

t) _ 

C3 03 

OJ l-H 

-|J o 

o 

<X> ^5 

S-c y 

<U 02 
P 

O nS 

-4-> ( w' 



5h i <U 

o 2 rt 

*" p. -2 

« S h 

1« . bo 

3 .S 

©«h42 

bog 

- « g 

02 <» P 
4J -i-i 

c 

o> 

.■„,.=! f 

.5 ° S 

^3 



"- 1 o c 
<u '43 <s 

U c3 — 

> s s 
^ § s 

fl«H a, 

«5b 
So 

o^ 



QJ 



3 P 
O h 



p ? « 



u 

t> fi o 

bo.- cs . 
<v > ."3 C 
33 g e3 « 

° 02 > " 

« w cS 

^H O 

a 



ca 



4«! 

Is 



s 

o 

p 

02 <U 



< o 

w D Z 

"- — z 

O rE " 

E tn 

■o ^ S 

r- »0 U 

"- ■- r- 

tt - UJ 

S n " 

S i- 

LU l/» 

> 3 

o o 
z< 

O TT 

< £ 

Ol 

U ^ 
U 

o 



e s 

S3 
™" a 
SB 



III 

^ « ^ 

• SB 

as. a 



co a a. 



4 c S 

|3E 
* a o 

II 



e u ■ 

We 



ESI 

4» C O. 

£ '5 E 

q be « 



t- io t- CO CO i-« eo eo Cft »H N (O CO N "3 "^ "^ ^* 

ID t- N UD CO WUSO^NOH CO U H 

N»OHH rl iH fH M rj 



en «o co cm co IO »-h cm os eo co io eo co cm ■* ^ 

rH rH CM C- rH rH MHH CO Hg 



IO CO CO 



CO CO OS CM CO 



rH rH rH t- 



rHO00t-CJ> HW^WHIO lOrHCOrH 

rHCM rH CM rH 



CO lO CM « lOCOCMCMCOIN OS H(D 



CO tOHWt-Ol t- OOCOCMrHOO'^' CO» 



H CO CM t- CO r 

CO CM CM W t- < 

H rH CM 



•m toai-rticoi-t t- cocoioocO'^CftcNeOrHeoc 

X) rH CM "# H CO C- CM rH rH Tji M Ht 



rH U3 




c3 M cj Bh to co O *i 



WK 



a dxo 


c 


C 


C 




•h^H 


<3J 


<D 


o 




.3 T3 <U 

^5 'S b 


s 


s 


-l-> 






o 


CJ 




> 


P 


s 




teac 

out 

mplc 


CD 

. J- 


CJ 
(H 




148 
hing 
se e 


o 

p 




X) 

c 




o 'r* 








■^ 


^ cfl P 


CD 


t> 


M 


CO 


if o> >h 


-4-J 




OJ 






C3 
3 


CO 


0) 


e 

o 


^o 10 © 




Si 


03 

s 


0) 

7 1 ! 


M ^^ 


bo 




cu 

s 


_rt 


Ti -•-> 


bo 


'^j 


o 


crt 


totale 
the S 
State 




s 

G 


CO 


> 
a 

a 

3 



>> > bo 2 o 

3§.SEfi 
•3 c ^ g 2 
•S * * J§ | 

S «^o 
.3 hi « sL 

.2 8 ^ § 5 
P ra ca ^ 

5n <" s 



a 
a 

3 
co 

P 

CU 

c 



cu 

S-i 

o> 
P cu 

js a 

.ses 

cu cu 



= 3 S 

p 3 O cS 

CU -T *-£ L-" 

3 -° 3 « 

" P c3 

9-3 8 

s-i co c 

3 3 3 

cs g * 

cu r 1 

+j bo cj 



3 — on TJ 



s 

CU 
,£) 

+-> 

s 

cu 

si 
H 



CO 

cu • 

no .i-i 

3 2 

to g 



cS T3 

3 S 



^5 Ui fe 

•o -a .£? 
"a3 3 M 

.i-i ^ r^ 



<U 



C3 O 

o '3 



w S 

>> s 

,3 O 



td as 
9 3 

SP « 

3 S 

3°^ ° 

_ 02 +J 

3 oS O 

'3 oS 

O •— l >H 

"H ft O 

cu ft 51 " 1 

-a 3 c 

+3 02 g 

3 P 



IS - 

■a? W 

w 2 

43 

cu v 

43 

" ,rt M 

3°^ 

.3 o 

43 _ 
o bo 
oS 3 

cu ••-* 

-*-> 43 

5_ as 
3 CU 

p^ 



o > 

SH P 



3 CU 
D 13 

is 2ts 



SO B 

v .3 

3 
■8.2 



ft 



« 3; 

ai'O J 

cu C 

cu 

CU !-i 

Jh 43 2 

03-^3 

a+J 43 
CU cu « 
u cu 

a 3 33 

. R 05 

- o S 

3 o 



0<J5 02 

TJ oS cu 

as cu cu 

•° >>-3 

«H Sh OS 

c s-2 

03 CU "2 

IK.2 S S 2 






J U 3 

-.15 o3 



CO 

*J 

03 
3 
TJ 
03 

!m 

cu 

43 

o 
03 
CU 

H 



T3 
03 

Sm 

bo 
03 
_B 

O 

as 

o 



■3.S 

2 « 

3 eo 

O cu 

02 +j 

s- 
cu « 

-* 02 
LO 02 

„ * 

o O 

1 03 
B U 

o 

03 <)H 



CU cu 

43 2 

+j oS 

t ® 

bO Sh 

•5 c 



-u Sh 

oS as 



C/2 



cu w 

H-> S 

9 "o 

as 

cu w 

H-> 03 

3 CD 



"T "3 



«a 



CO 



ai ^3 ' 



CU 43 +3 



_ IO 

_ Sh tO 

03 .— CU C35 

3 bo o i-i 



2 8 1 

bO >>,£ 

4J»2 
O 3 rv 
SO 
02 '" CO 

S 2 1 

b- q.^3 
to " o 

•*T a3 

^n cu cu 

CU 4J 

43 t- 
+» bO'* 
sh 3 -* 

o£ * 

■^3 02 

CM 2 

t- 02 43 
t- CU ** 

<H *5 

o 3 O 



02 T3 

03 s 

"3 
cu 

Sh CO 
=8 3 

a ® 

a, 43 

fa 2 

a <s 

cu 

cu *» 

Sh 

CU ^H 



CO 



• Sh 
Sh oS 
OS +j 
cu 3 
>> cu 



CO CU 

2 "3 



Sh 
CU 

02 43 

03 <-> 
o3 

T3 cu 
cu +» 

% +> 

Co o 

a cu 

CU •!-» 

Sh 42 

a 3 

to 

cu 

Sh 



03 
43 



OS 



02 
CU 

H-> 

OS 

-3 

f 3 

>> 

3 



P «J 

CU 

m a 

to w 

"t u 

eo o 



cu cu 

43 t-i 
+i 03 

«H 02 

o cu 

O "3 
Sh 03 
CU Sh 

a bO 
to CU 

co -*5 

13 CU 
3 "^ 
03 — 

02 o 
^43 

03 w 
3 M 

■3 43 
03 bO 
Sh .— 
bO 43 



bo 




3 








43 




ej 


CO 


03 




CU 


O 


+J 


o 




43 


>> 


O 


-M 


02 


3 


CJ 


CU 




S-i 




Sh 


4J 


3 


3 


u 


a 



Sh 00 CU 

as -r co 
cu o o 

43 +J 
w ^^ 

O co 

O >H 

43 O 2 
O 2 43 

^3 CU 

3 ^^ 
CU s 

o = 
cu co gs 

4!U^ 

+j w cc 

*^ 43 ^h 
O ¥ ^ 

^3 



CU i-l 
43 £> 



bo 



CM 



I* 

3-° 

-3 ^ 

Sh 

4-j o3 

-* £> 

bo >^ 

§.2 

■^ S 

•4J CU 

o 'O 

3 03 

o 

-3 =8 

j8 m 

i^ co 

O ■"* 

43 S 
P rH 



S go 
S ° cu 
cu a 
U.2 ra 



cu 
43 



m 43 
CO p 

-3 
CU 02 

>> Sh 
O CU 



S « 

S CU 

CU 

Sh — , 

CU O 

*.S 

CU o 

02 CO 
CU 



Sh 
O 

Sh 
03 

73 
3 JL 

° £ 
« 2 

co 43 

ej 

cu *^ 



o 
oo.® 

«>3 

iH 03 



_2 3 

43 bo 

bO 33 

S 43 

43 bo 



w - 



cu 

43 
•p> 


Sh 
O 






T3 


W 


<D 


Sh 


03 


CU 
43 


CO 


CJ 




OS 


>J 


CU 



•^ —i 

o 

a 



co 

§ P 

.3i CU 

> 3 
cu 

Sh • 

a 3. 



co ■" 

• CO 

s 



I ^3 

S43 s 
w - » b 

03 CO 3 

te "3 o 

P 3 o 

cu cu 

Sh 3 co 

g|oO 
>. CU ^ 

„H H " 

O W 13 

00 bO 

C 02 

tO .3 Sh 

CO T3 O 

.A 3 >*l 

5S o « 

5£5 s cu 



3 "S i. 
•3 to *3 
3 cu o 

33 co 

^ 8 h 

» «> "3 

Sh 2 C 
CU 43 CU 

43 +» S 

2 - 2 

W m r- 

O 03 O 
O ^ 

+» co .0 

CU 



M 



bo 02 
3 co 

3 — 



•r— J MM 

42 3 .. 

3 "3 fe 

to 43 P" 

O 

_ 03 T3 

l*| 

CU CU 3 

^ £ 

00 -P> "O 



3 _ CU 

bo 12 -=s 



H » S 

o .2 

- 3 HP 
CO CU CO 

2*3 § 

1 colo 
S ^ o 



H .43 

.oft 
<oT bo _ 

O 03 W 

333 
cu bo cu 



Physical Education Supervisors Share Ideas 
On Development Trends in School Programs 



Directions for the improvement 
of the health and physical educa- 
tion programs in North Carolina's 
public schools were explored at a 
conference of physical education 
supervisors held in January at the 
Education Building in Raleigh. 

Participating in the meeting 
were supervisors from more than a 
score of school administrative units 
across the State, and the Health 
and Physical Education staff of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction. 

Charles E. Spencer, State super- 
visor, who presided, opened the 
meeting with a brief review of the 
development of the physical educa- 
tion program over the past three 
decades, noting the rapid expan- 
sion and improvement in staff, 
facilities, and quality. 

The place of health and physi- 
cal education in a balanced and 
comprehensive instructional pro- 
gram ranging from kindergarten 
through grade 12 was delineated by 
Nile F. Hunt, director of the Divi- 
sion of Instructional Services. 
Needs Cited 

He stressed the need for coordi- 
nation of health and physical edu- 
cation with other phases of the 
instructional program, citing the 
inadequacy of the present re- 
quirement for physical education 
through grade 9, and recommend- 
ing extension through grade 12. 
Other desirable developments, he 
said, would be more distinct sepa- 
ration of health and physical edu- 
cation to allow for proper emphases 
in each area; improved communica- 
tion with school administrators in 
interpreting the standards for good 
programs in these areas ; and closer 
cooperation between State and 
local agencies. 

In the future, he said, the efforts 
of the State staff will be increas- 
ingly directed to assisting local 
supervisory staffs, who in turn will 
work directly with instructional 
personnel, and to greater selectiv- 
ity in planning structured meet- 
ings, such as clinics and workshops. 

State Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll, in brief remarks, empha- 
sized the basic character of health 



education and the desirability of 
developing this vital area of the 
instructional program. 

Federal Programs 

Procedures involved in develop- 
ing projects under the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act were 
outlined by Carton T. Fleetwood, 
State coordinator of the National 
Defense Education Act programs 
and chairman of the State agency's 
Steering Committee for ESEA pro- 
posals. Other federal support pro- 
grams with implications for health 
and physical education were also 
reviewed. 

Concern for human relations was 
emphasized in a discussion led by 
Miss Helen Stuart. Always, the 
primary concern in developing pro- 
grams should be "what is happen- 
ing to children," Miss Stuart de- 
clared. Supervisors also need to 
assume responsibility for the de- 
velopment of wholesome working 
relationships with school personnel 
which will serve the primary aim of 
improving the teaching-learning 
situation, she stated. 

Other discussions, led by George 
Shackelford and Floyd Woody of 
the State staff, focused on State 
standards for accreditation in 
health and physical education; pro- 
gram ideas and materials ; and 
the recently-published curriculum 
guide, Physical Education — Secon- 
dary Schools, Grades 7-12. 



Workshops on Nongrading, 
Team Teaching Scheduled 

The University of North Caro- 
lina at Greensboro will offer two 
campus workshops this summer on 
Elementary School Nongrading and 
Team Teaching. 

Teachers completing either of 
the workshops will receive two 
semester hours of certificate re- 
newal credit. The first workshop 
will be held July 18-22 and date 
of the second one is July 25-29. The 
cost is $50. Housing will be avail- 
able on the campus. Information 
and application blanks may be se- 
cured from the workshop director. 
Dr. Marian Franklin, at the 
Greensboro institution. 



Pilot TV Course Being 
Developed For Farmers 

A pilot project using television 
in adult farmer education has been 
approved by the State Board of 
Education and will be conducted by 
the Vocational Agriculture Section 
of the Division of Vocational Edu- 
cation. The board has allocated 
$2,950 for the project. 

V. B. Hairr, supervisor of Voca- 
tional Agriculture for the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
said a 12-hour short course is being 
planned. Subject of the course will 
be determined by a survey now un- 
der way. Classes will meet each 
Wednesday from 7 p.m. until 9 
p.m. in 25 schools for six weeks. 
There will be 30 minutes of special 
instruction conducted through a 
telecast over TV education chan- 
nels 2 and 4. The local agriculture 
teacher will then continue the dis- 
cussion with the class. 

Special teaching aids 'and refer- 
ences will be furnished each par- 
ticipating school. Hairr said the 
Vocation Agriculture Section will 
work with the Agricultural Educa- 
tion Department and the Center 
for Research, Development, and 
Training in Occupational Educa- 
tion at North Carolina State Uni- 
versity in Raleigh to develop a 
systematic procedure for evaluat- 
ing the project. 



Winston Principal Succumbs 

Carl Roosevelt Martin, Jr., 47, 
principal of Carver Junior-Senior 
High School in Winston-Salem, 
died January 18. He suffered from 
a blood disorder during much of 
the 1964-65 school year. However, 
he had been working regularly un- 
til he was hospitalized January 17. 

Martin graduated from George- 
town High School, Georgetown, 
111.; received his B.S. degree from 
Winston-Salem State College; took 
his M. S. degree at the University 
of Michigan; and had completed 
academic requirements at Michigan 
for a doctorate. 

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Martin, a teacher in 
Winston-Salem, and a young son. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Supplying Textbooks for Tar Heel Schools 
Involves Complex, Coordinated Operations 



Keeping North Carolina's 1.2 
million public school students sup- 
plied with up-to-date textbooks is a 
mammoth enterprise, involving 
complex procedures in procure- 
ment, scheduling, and distribution, 
and periodic appraisals of a vast 
array of published materials. 

Records of the State Board of 
Education's Division of Textbooks, 
which handles the bulk of all basal 
textbooks used in the schools, as 
well as a large share of the supple- 
mentary textbooks and library 
books, afford a gauge of the huge 
supply operation. Claude C. War- 
ren, director of the Division, cited 
the following statistics: 

• During the 1964-65 school 
year, the Division spent $5.8 mil- 
lion for approximately 2,217,000 
textbooks and library books. 

• Between May 1, 1965 and the 
beginning of the current school 
year, the State Textbook Ware- 
house at Raleigh received more 
than three million pounds of books, 
most of which were circulated. 

This year's catalogue of State 
adopted textbooks lists 56 basal 
textbooks and more than 800 sup- 
plementary textbooks for high 
school use, and 80 basal textbooks 
and nearly 1,000 supplementary 
textbooks for the elementary 
schools. The Library Book Cata- 
logue lists more than 6,500 titles. 

Every year there are several 
changes in the list of basal text- 
books as the curriculum is updated 
and improved, and the supplemen- 
tary and library book lists also are 
revised. The 22 basal textbook re- 
placements approved for this year 
include a science textbook for the 
seventh grade, reading books for 
for the fourth through eighth 
grades, four new shorthand books, 
and science and industrial arts 
texts for the high school grades. 

Selection Procedures 

The task of reviewing available 
materials and recommending those 
most suitable for adoption as basal 
textbooks is carried out by the 12- 
member State Textbook Commis- 
sion, which is composed of a school 
superintendent and elementary and 



high school teachers and principals. 
Members are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor, upon the recommendation of 
the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, to serve four-year 
terms. George S. Willard, superin- 
tendent of Wilson City Schools, is 
chairman of the present Commis- 
sion, which was named in October 
1965. 

The State purchases textbooks 
under contracts which run from 
three to seven years, usually aver- 
aging five years. Thus, each year 
some contracts must be reconsid- 
ered. Since the average life of a 
textbook is about five years, there 
is no great loss in the adoption of 
new books. 

Criteria Outlined 

Criteria for the selection of text- 
books based on the State approved 
curriculum are developed by the 
professional staff of the Depart- 
ment and are submitted to the 
Commission along with copies of 
available books from many pub- 
lishers. It is then left up to the 
members of the Commission to re- 
view the textbooks and to prepare 
written reports on each book under 
study. 

These signed reports are then 
examined at a joint meeting of the 
State Board of Education and the 
Textbook Commission. A multiple 
list of titles (usually three) is 
selected for each subject under 
study, and sealed bids are requested 
on these books. After receiving the 
bids and conferring once more with 
the Commission, the State Board 
finally adopts the basal textbooks. 

A different procedure is followed 
in selecting supplementary text- 
books. This is done by the profes- 
sional staff of the Department. 
Last year the staff examined more 
than 2,000 books and approved 
about 800 for the supplementary 
book list. 

Library books and materials are 
continuously reviewed by the staff 
of the Department's Library and 
Instructional Materials Services, 
which periodically issues classified 
bibliographies for the use of school 
librarians. 



$1.5 Million Challenge 
Grant Given Art School 

The Ford Foundation has given 
a $1.5 million challenge gift to the 
North Carolina School of the Arts 
at Winston-Salem. 

Gov. Dan Moore, in announcing 
the gift, said the school must raise 
another $5.5 million. Under terms 
of the grant, Ford Foundation will 
give $500,000 to the school during 
the first year. The trustees will 
have to match this with $500,000 
from other sources. In each of the 
four following years, the founda- 
tion will give the school $250,000 
and in each of these years the 
trustees will have to raise at least 
$500,000. 

The Ford money will be paid to 
the North Carolina School of Arts 
Foundation which was established 
to accept private contributions for 
endowment, buildings, scholarships 
and other purposes. The same foun- 
dation will also receive the private 
contributions which will be sought 
throughout the State and nation to 
fulfill the $7 million fund-raising 
program. 



Physical Ed. Workshop 

For Retarded Planned 

A two-day workshop on physical 
education for the mentally retarded 
will be held at the Physical Educa- 
tion Department of the University 
of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, on 
April 1 and 2. It is one of 15 being 
held throughout the United States 
this spring and is sponsored by the 
American Association for Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation 
(a Department of the N.E.A.) in 
cooperation with the Joseph P. 
Kennedy, Jr. Foundation. 

Teachers of special education, 
college physical education staff 
members and professional students, 
community recreators, camp coun- 
selors, and others concerned with 
programs of the mentally retarded 
are urged to attend. Information 
about the workshop may be secured 
from Mrs. Ruth White Fink at the 
university who will serve as work- 
shop coordinator. 



MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



11 



Eight- New Staffers Join State Education Agency 



Eight staff additions to the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
were recently announced by State 
Superintendent Charles F. Carroll. 

Two men have joined the Divi- 
sion of Instructional Services. 
Roger Schurer is a new supervisor 
of secondary education in the 
Supervision and Curriculum 
Section and Neal Smith is a speech 
and hearing consultant in the 
Special Education Section. Both 
joined the Department on Febru- 
ary -1. 

Schurer has served the New 
Hanover County Schools as a social 
studies teacher and as assistant 
principal. The Junior Chamber of 
Commerce in New Hanover named 
him "Outstanding Young Educa- 
tor" for 1965. He is a native of 
Cleveland, Wis., located on Lake 
Michigan, and first came to North 
Carolina as a member of the U. S. 
Marine Corps in 1952. Following 
his discharge he entered Eastern 
Carolina College where he received 
the B.S. and M.Ed, degrees and 
met his wife, the former Sally Goff 
of Rocky Mount. The couple has a 
six-year-old daughter. 

Smith is a native of Bailey in 
Nash County. He took his A.B. 
degree at Pfeiffer College and his 
M.Ed, at the University of North 
Carolina in Greensboro. He has 
taught in the Dallas and Gaston 
County public schools, served as 
speech therapist in Rowan County, 
taught at the University in Greens- 
boro, and taught at the University 
of Mississippi where he also took 
two additional years of graduate 
work. He is married to the former 
Elizabeth Withers of Spencer, a 
registered nurse. 

In Agriculture 

Three assistant supervisors of 
agriculture education have been 
added to the Division of Voca- 
tional Education. They are Bruce 
Hargrove, to be stationed at A and 
T College in Greensboro; J. L. 
Hassell, in the Raleigh office of 
Vocational Agriculture; and M. S. 
Saunders, also to be stationed at 
A and T College. Hargrove is a 
native of Dillon, S. C. and attended 



the public schools in Robeson 
County, N. C. He took both his 
B. S. and M. A. degrees at A and 
T College, and he taught in the 
Maxton City schools where he also 
served as a principal. He is the 
current president of the South- 
eastern District of the North 
Carolina Teachers Association. 
He is married to the former 
Catherine Alexander of Concord, 
and the couple has two boys and 
a girl, all teenagers. 

Hassell is a native of Jamesville 
in Martin County. He attended 
Campbell Junior College and grad- 
uated from North Carolina State 
University in Raleigh, taking his 
degree in agriculture education. 
He has since taught vocational 
agriculture in the Oak City High 
School and is married to the 
former Martha Johnson of that 
city. 

Saunders is a native of Cabar- 
rus County. He took his B.S. 
degree at Tennessee State Col- 
lege in Nashville and his M.A. at 
A and T College. He has been 
teaching vocational agriculture in 
the Henderson Institute. He is the 
current president of the North 
Carolina Agriculture Teachers' 
Association. Saunders is married 
to the former Bessie Ramsey of 
Ft. Worth, Texas, and they have 
three children, ranging in age 
from 10 to 23 years. 

In Guidance 

Miss Kathryn Marie Ray, a 
native of Hillsborough, is the new 
assistant supervisor of the Guid- 
ance Services Section of the 
Division of Vocational Education. 
She received her A.B. from the 
University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro, her M.Ed, from the 
University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill, and is doing further 
graduate study at Chapel Hill 
toward a doctorate degree. She 
has both taught and served as a 
counselor at Altamahaw-Ossipee 
School in Alamance County, the 
Mooresville High School, and the 
Walter M. Williams High School 
at Burlington. For the past five 
years she was a full-time counse- 
lor in the Burlington school. 



Mecklenburg Bonds Pass 

The citizens of Mecklenburg 
County voted a bond issue on Jan- 
uary 25 in the amount of $9,275,000 
and which includes $2 million for 
an Education Center for the Char- 
lotte-Mecklenburg schools and $3 
million for Central Piedmont Com- 
munity College. 

The Education Center, to be built 
in the governmental plaza in Char- 
lotte, will house administrative 
offices ; a curriculum study and im- 
provement center; an in-service 
training area, and office and work 
space for community, student, and 
teacher organizations. 



Two additions have been made 
to the professional staff of the 
School Food Services Section of 
the Division of Vocational Edu- 
cation. Mrs. Jean Heinig is assist- 
ant State supervisor and Homer 
Holmes is associate supervisor. 

Mrs. Heinig is a native of Eaton 
Rapids, Mich, and received a B.A. 
degree in home economics edu- 
cation from Albion College where 
she also served for over five years 
as food service director. She is 
the mother of three children, the 
youngest of whom is in the Peace 
Corps, stationed in Thailand. Mrs. 
Heinig comes to the Department 
of Public Instruction from the 
food service department at the 
University of North Carolina in 
Chapel Hill. 

Holmes is a native of Tyler- 
town, Miss. He received his B.S. 
and M.A. degrees from the Uni- 
versity of Southern Mississippi. 
Prior to taking his degrees he 
completed a commercial course at 
Bowling Green Business Univer- 
sity. He has been a first sergeant 
in the U. S. Army, has been a 
classroom teacher for 10 years, 
served for 10 years as a school 
superintendent, and for seven 
years was with the Mississippi 
State Department of Education, 
the Division of Administration 
and Finance, School Food Serv- 
ices. His wife is teaching in the 
Jackson, Miss, public schools and 
will join him in Raleigh in June. 
Their only son is a senior at 
Mississippi College. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



AMA Statement Outlines Rights and Duties 
Involved in High School Athletic Programs 



(Editor's Note — The following 
is a statement regarding high 
school athletic programs recently 
released by the American Medical 
Association.) 

Participation in high school 
athletics is a privilege involving 
responsibilities and rights. The 
athlete has the responsibility to 
play fair, give his best, keep in 
training, and conduct himself with 
credit to his sport and his school. 
In turn he has the right to optimal 
protection against injury as this 
may be assured through technical 
instruction, proper regulation and 
conditions of play, and adequate 
supervision. Included are: 

Good coaching. The importance 
of good coaching in protecting the 
health and safety of athletes can 
not be minimized. Technical in- 
struction leading to skillful per- 
formance is a significant factor 
in lowering the incidence and de- 
creasing the severity of injuries. 
Also, good coaching includes the 
discouragement of tactics, outside 
either the rules or the spirit of 
the rules, which may increase the 
hazard and thus the incidence of 
injuries. 

Good officiating. The rules and 
regulations governing athletic 
competition are made to protect 
players as well as to promote en- 
joyment of the game. To serve 
these ends effectively the rules of 
the game must be thoroughly un- 
derstood by players as well as 
coaches and be properly inter- 
preted and enforced by impartial 
and technically qualified officials. 

Good equipment and facilities. 
There can be no question about 
the protection afforded by proper 
equipment and right facilities. 
Good equipment is now available 
and is being improved continu- 
ally; the problem lies in the false 
economy of using cheap, worn out, 
outmoded, or ill-fitting gear. Pro- 
vision of proper areas for play and 
their careful maintenance are 
equally important. 

Good medical care. First, a thor- 
ough preseason history and physi- 
cal examination. Many of the 



sports tragedies which occur each 
year are due to unrecognized 
health problems. Medical contra- 
indications to participation in 
contact sports must be respected. 

Second, a physician present at 
all contests and readily available 
during practice sessions. It is un- 
fair to leave to a trainer or coach 
decisions as to whether an athlete 
should return to play or be re- 
moved from the game following 
injury. In serious injuries the 
availability of a physician may 
make the difference in preventing 
disability or even death. 

Third, medical control of the 
health aspects of athletics. In 
medical matters, the physician's 
authority should be absolute and 
unquestioned. Today's coaches and 
trainers are happy to leave medi- 
cal decisions to the medical pro- 
fession. They also assist in inter- 
preting this principle to students 
and the public. 



Surry Community College 
Starts Campus Buildings 

A traditionally turned shovel of 
dirt marked the beginning of con- 
struction of the new Surry Com- 
munity College campus at Dobson 
on February 9. 

Robert E. Merritt, of Mount 
Airy, vice chairman of the board 
of trustees, said the ceremony 
"represents the step from a home- 
less institution to one with a 
home." 

Initial construction will include 
three main buildings — a learning 
resources center to house adminis- 
tration, library, teaching auditori- 
um, student center, and class- 
rooms; a science-technology build- 
ing for laboratories and classroom ; 
and a shop building to also include 
space for physical education. Com- 
pletion has been scheduled for the 
spring of 1967. Cost will be 
$1,350,000 and is being paid by 
county, State, and Federal funds. 

College President I. John Kre- 
pick also participated in the cere- 
mony. 



Guide Offers Pointers 
On Physical Education 

The importance of providing a 
balanced and diversified program 
of physical education for all stu- 
dents in the public schools, planned 
with careful attention to specific 
needs identified with various levels 
of maturity and capacity, is em- 
phasized in the most recent cur- 
riculum bulletin issued by the State 
Department of Public Instruction. 

Physical Education — Secondary 
Schools, Grades 7-12 (Publication 
No. 393) contains a wealth of valu- 
able information and recommenda- 
tions for strengthening this vital 
phase of the curriculum, set forth 
in clear-cut language and well- 
designed format. 

Prepared by the School Health 
and Physical Education staff of the 
Department under the direction of 
Charles E. Spencer, State super- 
visor, the guide incorporates the 
contributions of several advisory 
committees. Staff members who co- 
operated in developing the publi- 
cation were Miss Helen Stuart, 
Floyd Woody, and George Shackel- 
ford. Editorial assistance was pro- 
vided by L. H. Jobe, and the layout 
was designed by Mrs. Ann W. 
Gray. 

The 84-page printed bulletin in- 
cludes numerous concrete sugges- 
tions which should be of use in 
planning the instructional program 
and facilities ; reviews the char- 
acteristics and needs of adolescents 
which should be considered in de- 
veloping a well-rounded physical 
education program; and offers an 
overview of objectives and an out- 
line of basic activities for each 
grade level. 

Detailed discussion is accorded 
to the organization and objectives 
of several phases of the program — 
adapted physical education for stu- 
dents with various types of dis- 
abilities; intramural activities ; and 
evaluation and measurement — as 
well as to the general aims and 
objectives of the overall program 
and recommendations pertaining 
to facilities, scheduling, program 
structure, and other organizational 
and administrative pointers. A list 
of selected references is provided 
at the close of each chapter. 



MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



13 



Physical Fitness of America's School Children 
Shows Big Improvement Over Eight Year Period 



Eight years has seen a big im- 
provement in the physical fitness 
of America's school children ! The 
average 12-year-old boy is strong- 
er, faster, more agile, better co- 
ordinated, and has more bodily 
efficiency and endurance than his 
19-year-old brother had at the same 
age. 

Because of this, the physical 
standards he must meet in his 
school gym classes have been 
raised. 

In a test given during the 1964- 
65 school year to 9,200 boys and 
girls in 49 states, ranging in age 
from 10 through 17 years of age, 
physical performance was found to 
be significantly higher than it was 
in the 1957-58 school year when 
similar tests were made. Every age 
group, both boys and girls, per- 
formed better on every test item. 

The 1957-58 tests were conducted 
by the American Association for 
Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation — a department of the 
National Education Association. 
The 1964-65 tests were conducted 
by the University of Michigan, 
supported by funds from the coop- 
erative Research Program of the 
U. S. Office of Education. The 
director of both projects was Dr. 
Paul A. Hunsicker, professor of 
education at the University. 

Dr. Hunsicker explained that the 
physical performance of practically 
any group of school children can 
be improved by increasing the 
physical and physiological demands 
of their bodies. "The point which 
has been overlooked is sensitizing 
the pupil to the need for maintain- 
ing a high level of health through- 
out life," he said. "This objective 
can best be achieved through qual- 
ity programs of health and physi- 
cal education." 

National Norms 

Using the new national norms 
for physical fitness, the average 
12-year-old is expected to do three 
pullups instead of two; 50 situps, 
instead of 31; broad jump five and 
one-half feet instead of barely over 
five feet; run the 50-yard dash in 
7.8 seconds instead of 8 seconds; 



throw a softball 120 feet instead 
of 110 feet; take a 120 foot shuttle- 
run in 11 seconds flat instead of 
11.4 seconds; and cover 600 yards 
by a combination of running and 
walking in two minutes 21 seconds 
instead of two minutes 39 seconds. 

The first testing program was 
begun after a study showed that 
European youngsters did better 
than Americans on fitness tests. 
Since then, Dr. Hunsicker pointed 
out, there has been increased em- 
phasis on physical education in 
elementary schools. Nearly half the 
states have strengthened physical 
education requirements in schools. 

There are more and better physi- 
cal education teachers at work now, 
he said. Also, there has been an 
increase in the number of elemen- 
tary schools which have gymnasi- 
ums. The U. S. Office of Education 
reports that 53 percent of the 
nation's grade schools now have 
gyms. 



Four Teacher Study Tours 
Awarded By Art Society 

Four North Carolina public 
school art teachers were chosen in 
January to receive $150 grants from 
the North Carolina State Art So- 
ciety toward financing a study tour 
of Washington and New York gal- 
leries and museums during the 
week of February 13. 

The school system of each teach- 
er matched the grant. The four met 
in Raleigh at the North Carolina 
Museum of Art just prior to leav- 
ing for their trip. 

The four teachers are Benjamin 
Patrick of Greensboro, Robert 
Shepherd of Shelby, Mary Mintich 
of Charlotte, and Jean Hemphill of 
Franklin. 

Local superintendents nominated 
grant applicants and Perry Kelly, 
art supervisor in the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, served 
as chairman of the Art Society 
committee that picked the winners. 

Mrs. George Paschal, Jr., of 
Raleigh, president of the State Art 
Society, said this is to be an an- 
nual event. 



Rehabilitation Statistician 
Retires After Long Service 

Mrs. Mary Dell Phifer retired 
from her position as statistician 
for the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation on January 12. 

Mrs. Phifer first served the divi- 
sion as secretary — from 1937 to 
1950 except for a four year period 
when her only child was small. 
During 1951 and 1952 she took 
special training in research and 
statistics and returned to the Divi- 
sion of Vocational Rehabilitation 
in 1953 as statistician. 

She is a native of Pittsboro, at- 
tended Western Carolina College, 
and took secretarial training at 
Hardbargers Business School in 
Raleigh. Her husband, William B. 
Phifer, recently retired from the 
North Carolina Employment Se- 
curity Commission where he had 
served as an accountant. Their 
daughter is a senior at Northwest- 
ern University in Chicago. 

The Phifers are building a home 
at Port Charlotte, Fla. and will 
divide their time between Florida 
and their home at 218 Hillcrest 
Road in Raleigh. 



Madison-Mayodan High Has 
Holland Exchange Teacher 

North Carolina's only Fulbright 
exchange teacher this year is Fran- 
circus Verhagen from Holland, who 
is teaching in the Madison-Mayo- 
dan Senior High School. He is 
serving as a replacement for Miss 
Betty Steele, Madison English 
teacher, who is in Amsterdam this 
year under the Fulbright Teacher 
Exchange Program. 

Verhagen teaches English in the 
town of Valkenswaad, near Ein- 
doven, a city in the interior of 
Holland. His wife, Janny, accom- 
panied him to America. She is a 
biochemist with the Phillips Co., 
an electrical and scientific firm in 
Holland. Both have expressed 
amazement at the extent of South- 
ern hospitality. Upon their arrival 
last August they found members 
of the faculty had furnished an 
apartment for them and then the 
faculty stopped by for a "pound- 
ing" — supplying the young couple 
with essentials for their pantry. 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^!4e AUai+tey Qenekcd Ruled, . . . 



Physical Education and Recreational 
Activities; Facilities for Physical Edu- 
cation and for Athletic Events as a 
Part of the Total School Program; 
Construction of Stadium with Ath- 
letic Field and Floodlights. 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 
You send me a letter from Mr. 

, Superintendent 

of County School 

Administrative Unit. This letter 
raises the question as to whether fa- 
cilities for physical education and for 
athletic events is a legal part of the 
total school program. The Superin- 
tendent's letter shows that a group of 
people united in a club of business 
men specifically organized for the pur- 
pose of helping the school finance the 
band, library and athletics in the 
High School has ap- 
plied to the County Board of Educa- 
tion for permission to erect a sta- 
dium, dressing rooms, press box and 
toilet facilities on the school grounds. 
The facility is to be lighted, and the 
School Board granted permission for 
such additions or construction. Per- 
sons who live near the site do not 
want such construction done and they 
contend that a lighted athletic field 
is not a part of the total school pro- 
gram and they ask that the School 
Board rescind its action on this basis. 
This group has raised about $40,000 
and the goal is $65,000. The facilities 
will become school property and will 
be controlled by the Board of Educa- 
tion. 

We think this question has already 
been answered by the Supreme Court 
of North Carolina. In BONEY v. 
KINSTON GRADED SCHOOLS, 229 
N. C. 136, the case shows that the 
schools trustees conveyed to the City 
of Kinston a tract of school property 
to be used as a playground, and the 
municipality was to construct thereon 
an athletic stadium. The considera- 
tion was that the graded schools of 
the district were to have the free and 
unlimited use of the stadium and 
grounds during the school term except 
when required for regularly scheduled 
games of a professional baseball as- 
sociation. The use of the stadium was 
governed by rules and regulations 
promulgated jointly by the munici- 
pality and the board of school trus- 
tees. A taxpayer brought suit to 
restrain this transaction. 

This was a lighted facility or sta- 
dium because it was provided in the 
agreement that the municipality 
would furnish all water and electric 



power for lighting. This is shown in 
the record of the case which is on file 
in the Office of the Clerk of the Su- 
preme Court. 

In holding that this was a valid 
consideration and was for a proper 
educational purpose the Supreme 
Court of North Carolina said: 

"The Pierce property was bought 
by the public school authorities 
with public school funds. It has 
hitherto been set apart by these 
authorities for the use of the chil- 
dren attending the Kinston Graded 
Schools as an athletic field and 
playground. Without doubt, this is 
a proper public school use, for 
physical training is a legitimate 
function of education. We affirm 
the soundness of the concept of 
education expressed by the Mon- 
tana Supreme Court in this lan- 
guage: 'By its voluntary act, the 
state has assumed the function of 
education primarily resting upon 
the parents, and by laws on com- 
pulsory education has decreed that 
the custody of children be yielded 
to the state during the major por- 
tion of their waking hours for five 
days a week, and, usually, nine 
months in the year. In doing so, 
the state is not actuated by motives 
of philanthropy or charity, but for 
the good of the state, and, for what 
it expends on education, it expects 
substantial returns in good citizen- 
ship. With this fact in mind, it is 
clear that the solemn mandate of 
the Constitution is not discharged 
by the mere training of the mind; 
mentality without physical well- 
being does not make for good 
citizenship — the good citizen, the 
man or woman who is the greatest 
value to the state, is the one whose 
every faculty is developed and 
alert. Education may be particu- 
larly directed to either mental, 
moral, or physical powers or facul- 
ties, but in its broadest and best 
sense it embraces them all.' Mc- 
NAIR v. SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 
1 OF CASCADE COUNTY, 87 
Mont. 423, 288 P. 188, 69 A.L.R. 
866. 

"Assuredly, nothing in our Consti- 
tution denies to the General Assem- 
bly power to enact appropriate 
statutes authorizing a legally es- 
tablished public school district to 
issue bonds or to levy taxes for the 
establishment and maintenance of 
an athletic stadium for its students 
upon land owned and controlled by 



it when authorized so to do by a 
vote of the majority of the quali- 
fied voters in the school district. 
N. C. Const., Art. VII, sec. 7; 47 
Am. Jur. Schools, sec. 75." 
In SMITH v. HEFNER, 135 N. C. 
1, the question arose as to whether 
trustees of a school administrative 
unit were engaged in proper govern- 
mental school functions in conducting 
athletics and games so as to be 
liable in tort to one of the spectators 
who was injured by the fall of a stack 
of cement blocks piled near where he 
was sitting. In holding that the pub- 
lic officials were not liable in damages 
the Court discussed the proposition 
of athletic fields for games and exhi- 
bitions in public schools, and in this 
connection said : 

"Nor does it appear that they were 
acting beyond the scope of their 
duties as such trustees and com- 
missioners. Under the modern con- 
cept of public education, which 
recognizes the necessity of minis- 
tering to the physical as well as 
the mental needs of school children, 
an athletic field for games and 
exhibitions, with grandstand or 
other seating facility, is an essen- 
tial part of the physical plant of a 
well integrated school unit. This 
being so, the action of the School 
Trustees and Park Commissioners 
in providing for the erection of a 
grandstand may not be treated as 
an activity beyond the scope of 
their duties as such public officials. 

# # # yi 

It is clear that the Supreme Court 
of North Carolina recognizes that 
athletic fields, stadiums, and all neces- 
sary things for these events are a part 
of the total educational program and 
are a part of physical education. 
These facilities may be used for 
games in which a limited number of 
persons participate and also for rec- 
reational grounds in which a large 
number of pupils participate. For 
many years bands, libraries and ath- 
letic fields, stadiums and related fa- 
cilities have been constructed and 
used in our public school systems, and 
it is now too late to say that this can- 
not be done. The fact that the facili- 
ties are lighted, as for example, with 
floodlights, is a mere incident or im- 
provement of the facilities and makes 
for greater utilization of the same. 
One might as well object to the toilet 
facilities and the dressing rooms as 
to object to the lights. For many years 
it has been common practice in this 
county for many athletics and games 
to be played at night in lighted fields ; 
(Continued on page 16) 



MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



15 



LOOKING BACK 

In March issues of the 
North Corolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 
New requirements adopted at 
the January meeting of the State 
Board of Education provide that 
teachers may earn credits toward 
renewal of their teaching certifi- 
cates by approved travel and by 
attending accredited workshops. 

Forty of each 100 pupils who 
entered the first grade in 1948-49 
graduated from high school 12 
years- later in 1959-60, according 
to reports recently compiled in the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction. 

Ten Years Ago, 1956 
Dr. Ralph Brimley, superintend- 
ent of Forsyth County schools, 
told a group of the State's profes- 
sional engineers on January 14 
that "you can have the kind of 
schools you want, if you'll tell the 
school people what you want and 
get some other taxpayers to help 
you pay for it." 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 
We need much more and much 
better education than ever before 
if the people of the United States 
are to achieve the strength for 
defense which is essential in the 
long pull ahead," states U. S. Com- 
missioner Earl J. McGrath in the 
1950 Annual Report of the Office 
of Education made public recently. 

In a statement adopted at its 
February meeting the State Board 
of Education declared emphatical- 
ly that the schools cannot operate 
on the appropriations recommended 
by the Advisory Budget Commis- 
sion for the next biennium. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1946 
H. A. Helms, principal of 
Broughton High School, advocated 
that principals in North Carolina 
schools be employed on a 12- 
months basis in a talk to the 
United School Principals' Unit of 
Raleigh and Wake County. 

Twenty-five Yeors Ago, 1941 
Over 6,000 out-of-school farm 
boys between the ages of 17 and 
24 are now enrolled in defense 
training classes. 



School News And Views Around The State 



Dacotah Cotton Mill of Lexing- 
ton has established full two-year 
scholarships at Davidson Commun- 
ity College which will be offered 
every valedictorian and salutatori- 
an in each high school in the Lex- 
ington, Thomasville, and Davidson 
County school system. 

The mill also has announced an- 
other scholarship program where- 
by one-half tuition scholarships to 
the college will be provided to any 
children of plant employees. David- 
son Community College will open 
in September. 



William Wright, 17, a school bus 
driver for the Greensboro admin- 
istrative unit, found his bus being 
followed by a city police patrol car 
one day last month. After deliver- 
ing his 200 some students, he 
learned he was the city's "Safe 
Driver of the Week." 

Sgt. O. E. Pickard said of 
Wright: "He was very careful with 
all signals, his stops and turns, and 
with his speed. He also had his 
passengers under control and prop- 
erly seated at all times." 



Several units of North Carolina's 
community college system have an- 
nounced courses which should ap- 
peal to persons with a gift of gab 
and a limber tongue. The institu- 
tions are located in the State's "to- 
bacco belt" and the name of the 
short course is "Tobacco Auction- 
eering." 



The Forsyth County sheriff's 
department, plagued by school 
break-ins and thefts of school cash 
and property, on the nights of 
January 5 and 6 checked schools 
throughout the area to find 40 
doors left unlocked or standing 
open at 15 schools. As a result, 
principals have reviewed and 
strengthened procedures for mak- 
ing sure all school doors are locked 
at the end of each day. 



The 1966 Junior Science and 
Humanities Symposium will be held 
April 17-19 at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill with 
Dr. R. G. Crockford, of the De- 
partment of Chemistry, as director. 

Around 160 high school students 
will participate by invitation. Six 



students will be chosen to present 
science papers for the symposium 
and will also be sent as guests to 
the national symposium at Prince- 
ton, N. J. Any senior high school 
student may enter the Statewide 
contest for student speakers. 



Superior Court Judge Robert A. 
Gambill on January 20 declined to 
void the 1965 special act which 
authorized the Moore County vote 
on school consolidation last fall. 

Council for the petitioners, J. D. 
Hobbs of Southern Pines and Dr. 
J. C. Grier, Jr., of Pinehurst who 
contend the act is unconstitutional, 
stated they intended carrying the 
matter to the State Supreme Court 
— aiming for the spring term. 



Floyd Worley, superintendent of 
the American Community School 
system in Athens, Greece, has been 
observing the New Hanover Coun- 
ty schools as part of the School-To- 
School program sponsored by the 
U. S. Department of State. 

The program involves the ex- 
change of curriculum materials, 
cultural exhibits, teachers, and stu- 
dents over a period of three years. 
The New Hanover schools were 
chosen as one of 25 school systems 
throughout the nation to be paired 
with schools in the State Depart- 
ment's Overseas School Program. 



Attorney General . . . 

(Continued from page 15) 

this is now a practice which is ap- 
proved and in common and general 
use. 

Attention is also called to Article 9 
of Chapter 115 of the General Stat- 
utes wherein it will be seen that ex- 
penditures for health and recreation 
are proper budget items as well as a 
comprehensive program of physical 
education. 

We are of the opinion, therefore, 
that the construction of a stadium, 
which is to be a lighted facility, as 
well as dressing rooms, press box and 
toilet facilities on this school prop- 
erty, is a part of the total school 
program, and such facilities and pro- 
gram are authorized by budgetary 
statutes and by the Supreme Court 
of North Carolina. Attorney General, 
February 16, 1966. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



.o 



5" 



7 : 3o/§ > 




ducational 
Iress 
soc1 ation 

OF 
'AMERICA 



North Carolina Stale Library 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



D 



C 



Oc 



APRIL 1966 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, NO. 8 




Guidelines Aimed at Speeding Desegregation of Soufh's Schools 



New Federal guidelines, aimed 
at doubling the rate of pupil de- 
segregation and producing signifi- 
cant faculty desegregation in 
Southern schools, were reviewed 
last month by U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation officials for North Carolina 
superintendents, school board mem- 
bers, and board attorneys. 

The meetings, called by State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion Charles F. Carroll, were 
held in Hickory on March 17 and 
in Raleigh on March 18. David 
Barus, acting deputy director of 
equal education opportunities of 
the USOE, said enforcement is 
moving from "paper negotiation 
to emphasis on performance" and 
that the aim is to eventually elim- 
inate any identification of a school 
by race. 

Unconstitutional? 

Barus described "freedom of 
choice" plans — under which 155 
of the 169 school units in the State 
operate — as a means of "under- 
taking at the initial stage" the 
desegregation of schools and that 
these plans must show "reason- 
able progress" in both faculty and 
pupil desegregation or some other 
type plan will be required. He ex- 
pressed the opinion that these 
voluntary plans will be held un- 
constitutional by the courts with- 
in a year or two. 

Things compliance officials will 
particularly watch for under such 
plans, he said, included the fol- 
lowing standards : 

• Schools achieving a signifi- 
cant percentage of desegregation 
this year — such as 8 or 9 percent 
— would be expected to double 
that percentage at the opening of 
the next school term. 

• If desegregation has been less 
than four or five percent, at least 
a tripling of the rate would be ex- 
pected. 

• If there was hardly any de- 
segregation this year, a greater 



percentage than schools in the four 
to five percent category would be 
expected. 

• There must be significant 
progress in desegregation of the 
regular teaching staff beyond 
what was accomplished in 1965- 
66. 

Barus said professional staff as- 
signments should be made strictly 
on the basis of qualifications 
without regard to race — then he 
added that, in order to offset past 
assignments under the dual school 
system, where qualifications are 
equal preference may have to be 
given to the Negro race. 
Amends Plan 

School units operating under 
approved freedom of choice, geo- 
graphic, or combination plans 



must sign form 441-B which as- 
sures the USOE they will abide 
by the new guidelines as they 
apply to the system's plan. This, 
Barus said, automatically amends 
the system's plan as it now stands 
to put it in line with revised re- 
quirements. 

School systems approved as 
having completely desegregated 
plans (under HEW-form 441) and 
those operating under court or- 
ders are not affected. However, 
the Commissioner of Education 
may ask these systems for addi- 
tional reassurances if statistics 
accumulated through the National 
Center for Educational Statistics 
indicate there is difficulty or if 

(Continued on page U) 



School Administrators Meet Largest Ever Held; 
Program Covered Vital Issues Facing Educators 

and sanctions ; 5 on topics relat- 
ing to church and schools ; and 
14 on health, including sex educa- 



Reporting to Department of 
Public Instruction staff members 
on the February 12-16 meeting of 
the American Association of School 
Administrators in Atlantic City, 
State Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll, Assistant Superintendent 
J. E. Miller, and various divisional 
directors said federal-state rela- 
tions, integration, church-state re- 
lations, and teacher unrest seemed 
uppermost in everyone's mind. 

A total of 29,193 school execu- 
tives and other educators attended 
this largest and most comprehen- 
sive meeting ever held on educa- 
tion. Fifty discussion groups — and 
this but a fraction of all the clinics, 
seminars, and other meetings — 
went on simultaneously. There 
were 29 sessions on civil rights and 
educating the culturally deprived; 
26 about the impact of the Federal 
government on education; 53 on 
facets of curriculum improvement; 
22 on personnel matters, employee 
organizations, negotiations, strikes, 



tion and cigaret smoking. 
Johnson Speaks 

President Johnson, addressing 
himself directly to complaints that 
federal money may lead to federal 
control, said if education is to 
achieve its promise in America "it 
cannot and must not be done in 
Washington alone." "Each state 
and each community must fashion 
its own design and shape its own 
institutions," he said. "But we will 
need a common vision to build 
schools to match our common hopes 
for the future. Every school will 
be different, but the differences will 
not range as they do today between 
satisfactory and shocking. We will 
have instead a diversity of excel- 
lence." 

Harold Spears, superintendent 
of the San Francisco Unified School 
District and AASA president-elect, 
(Continued on page 6) 



(Additional excerpts from address made at meeting of the Division of Principals of the 
NCEA, Asheville, November 3, 1965.) 

. . . Historically, traditionally, and basically, the principal is the "head teacher" — 
the principal teacher. 

I do not want to leave the impression that I think we in American education should 
emulate educators in other nations of the world in every way, but at the same time I 
feel that we can learn something from some of our contemporaries in other lands. 
Two years ago, as I may have related to some of you, twelve of us Chief State School 
Officers of the United States were invited by the government of West Germany to 
study some of its educational institutions and programs. You will recall that more 
than a century ago we borrowed much of our concept and many of our practices in 
public education from Germany. We Americanized our borrowing. Now, Germany 
seems to want to Americanize some of its programs. 

... It was in the principalship that I discovered perhaps the greatest variation in 
duties and qualifications. I did not see nor hear of a non-teachinq headmaster or 
principal because, I was given to understand, there is none — and for two simple 
reasons. Every headmaster or principal is required by law to do some teaching regard- 
less of size of school in order that he will not lose touch with the students. He is the 
administrator, he is the executive head, but first of all he is a teacher. In the second 
place, the headmaster or principal is the head teacher, the master teacher, the teacher 
of teachers, the teacher worthy of emulation. Every principal is a teaching principal 
in order that he might demonstrate to his fellow teachers the best in teaching con- 
tent, materials, and methods. 

In many respects this practice, in my opinion, has much merit which might com- 
mand our consideration. We consistently say that the primary function of the school 
is instruction, that the purpose of the school is to teach, and that the value of the 
school can be measured only in terms of the quantity and quality of learning which 
takes place. We in North Carolina have freed our principals of teaching responsi- 
bilities. Having effected this change we might appropriately ask, who serves as the 
head teacher of our schools? Who serves as the model instructor? Who provides the 
exampleship needed in fulfilling our teaching responsibilities? 

The German concept of the role of the principal might have implications for us 
also in terms of qualifications for employment. Their principals are recruited from 
the classroom where they have achieved some success. Are we equally diligent and 
discreet in the recruitment of our principals? The governing criteria to be considered 
in the selection of a principal are, first, those related directly to competency in the 
field of instruction and, secondly, to administrative ability. 

Again I say that I do not recommend that we emulate German educators in every 
way. Again I say, however, that they have something from which we can gain a 
lesson. . . . 

With more money available to us, we in North Carolina and in other states of 
the nation are going to have opportunity to do something that we have not done 
heretofore. The Elementary and Secondary Education Act about which you have 
learned much in recent days and weeks is filled with opportunities. In the implementa- 
tion of Title I we are going to learn, certainly insofar as our disadvantaged children 
are concerned, who our children really are — what the children are — what our 
children are not — why they are what they are possibly — why they are not something 
better. And, as we learn about the disadvantaged we are going to come into tech- 
niques and practices whereby we might know our advantaged children better. . . . 

Meanwhile we can be looking at some of our more normal duties and responsibili- 
ties as principals and as school administrators, particularly those functions and re- 
sponsibilities relating to evaluation of performance by both pupils and teachers. To 
warrant continuation beyond the first year of a project relating to Title I of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, we must show evidence through proper 
evaluation and assessment that progress has been achieved — progress on the part 
of the children for whom the project has been designed. . . . 

At the same time, we shall be concerning ourselves, I trust, with the performance 
of teachers. The time has arrived in North Carolina and in the other states when 
boards of education must show, sometimes upon the witness stand, that Teacher A 
has been employed because of documented competence in preference to Teacher B 
whose performance is also documentarily recorded. These documentations will neces- 
sarily be the products primarily of the principal of the school under whom each of the 
teachers has served. Evaluation of performance can no longer be a theory. It must 
be a fact — an established fact! 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the State Department of 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

CHARLES F. CARROLL J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

State Supt. of Public Instruction V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 

Vol. XXX, No. 8 APRIL, 1966 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

The more a man thinks, the bet- 
ter adapted he becomes to think- 
ing, and education is nothing if it 
is not the methodical creation of 
the habit of thinking. Ernest 
Dimnet, The Art of Thinking. 



I sing the praise of the Unknown 
Teacher. Great generals win cam- 
paigns, but it is the Unknown 
Soldier who wins the war. Famous 
educators plan new systems of 
pedagogy, but it is the Unknown 
Teacher who delivers and guides 
the young. . . . Knowledge may be 
gained from books; but the love 
of knowledge is transmitted only 
by personal contact. No one de- 
serves better of the Republic than 
the Unknown Teacher. No one is 
more worthy to be enrolled in a 
democratic aristocracy, "King of 
himself and servant of mankind." 
Dr. Henry Van Dyke. 



Citizens pay taxes to support 
their school system, often in quite 
substantial amounts. But the curi- 
ous thing is that if we paid lower 
school taxes, our tax rates for 
other governmental services might 
go up to or beyond the point 
where our total tax expenditure 
would be as great as it was before 
we tried to economize on schools. 
There are two reasons for this 
phenomenon. One is that good 
schools help young people to pre- 
pare themselves to earn a good 
living. As they earn substantial 
salaries, they pay substantial 
amounts of taxes. . . . The second 
reason is that inferior schools 
turn out individuals prone to un- 
employment, marital irresponsibil- 
ity, and delinquency. These per- 
sons necessitate larger public ex- 
penditures on their behalf. C. S. 
Benson, Education Is Good Busi- 
ness. 



It seems that throughout the 
civilization of man emergencies 
have arisen— however, in most 
cases, there have also arisen safety 
valves. One of the most important 
safety valves at the disposal of 
man is knowledge! Editorial, War- 
saw-Faison News. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



GUeatlna Students . . 



There are students who cheat 
and there are those who are cheat- 
ed ! The double entendre of the title 
is intended. 

In recent years, during which 
pressures from home, school, col- 
leges, and business have mounted 
for outstanding academic achieve- 
ment, renewed concern throughout 
the nation has manifested itself 
relative to cheating and the in- 
creasing acceptance of the problem 
as too big to handle. 

High school students in the Rich- 
mond, Va., area recently initiated 
a weekend seminar pertaining to 
this sensitive topic. In addition to 
becoming more aware of the prob- 
lem of cheating and its many 
facets, those in attendance suggest- 
ed certain specifics which might 
help to alleviate the problem. Ac- 
cording to the press, these specifics 
— sincere, honest, and commendable 
no doubt — touched primarily upon 
such items as how best to monitor 
examinations, whether to report to 
the faculty or an appropriate stu- 
dent government official those who 
cheated, and what constitutes 
cheating on homework. 

During the current academic 
year a number of colleges have be- 
come exercised, as is the custom 
periodically, over the problem of 
cheating. Headlines in the press 
and over the airwaves call atten- 
tion to students who have stolen 
copies of examinations, distributed 
them to fellow students — some- 
times for a fee— and then have 
been dismissed from school. Popu- 
lar magazines, often with a con- 
science, to be sure — but always con- 
scious of an increased readership 
— now and then present their 
analysis of the cheating problem, 
bemoan its existence, suggest that 
the problem is bigger than any of 
us, and recommend that some co- 
operative attack be made to remedy 
the situation. 

The Basis of Cheating 
Psychologists believe that cheat- 
ing is basically a manifestation of 
insecurity, a condition which seem- 
ingly drives offenders into acts of 
aggression, disobedience, misguided 
ambition, and efforts to seek grati - 
fication. Authorities on human be- 



havior also contend that the mores 
of twentieth-century society serve 
as a fertile background for encour- 
aging cheating. 

Other Side of Coin 

Though cheating by students 
remains a real problem in many 
schools and colleges, there is an- 
other side to the coin. Students 
throughout the nation, all too fre- 
quently — even in 1966 — are being 
cheated. 

Elementary students who are 
given copy books, color books, and 
mimeographed sheets to be filled 
in as part of their art experiences 
are definitely being cheated of the 
opportunity to develop appreciation 
and creativity. When all students 
within a class are required to use 
conventional workbooks, many are 
being cheated of the opportunity to 
move ahead at their own speed in 
areas of more productivity. When 
total emphasis at any grade level is 
on compartmentalization rather 
than appropriate and meaningful 
correlation, students are being 
cheated of the opportunity to under- 
stand overall purposes and relation- 
ships. When students are consist- 
ently required to memorize mean- 
ingless data, they are also being 
cheated. 

When students are given identi- 
cal assignments as a regular diet, 
many are being cheated. When 
homework has little or no personal 
meaning to students, they, too, are 
being cheated. When students are 
expected to do more than can be 
reasonably expected, they are — un- 
derstandably — frustrated and may 
be tempted to cheat; at the same 
time they are being cheated. Simi- 
larly, when students are permitted 
to do less than that of which they 
are capable, they are definitely 
being cheated. Research clearly in- 
dicates that when students have 
limited opportunities to work inde- 
pendently, they are definitely being 
cheated. When students have no 
opportunities to assist in planning 
their own learning experiences, or, 
in turn, to assist in evaluating 
these experiences, they are being 
doubly cheated. 

When students are given less 



responsibility for governing them- 
selves than that of which they are 
capable, they are being grievously 
cheated. When students are not 
guided in recognizing their poten- 
tialities and their limitations, they 
are likewise being cheated. When 
students are denied accessibility to 
a variety of instructional materials 
which are suited to varying levels 
of interest and ability, they are 
being cheated. When students are 
not consciously and consistently 
assisted in developing satisfactory 
study habits, they are surely being 
cheated. When students have not 
learned, directly or indirectly, the 
fundamental aspects of the learn- 
ing process, especially as they re- 
late to one's own individual prog- 
ress, they, too, are being cheated. 
Time For Action 
It is true that some students 
cheat on some occasions — for what- 
ever the reasons ! And, it is true 
that students are cheated — that is, 
some students on some occasions 
— for whatever the reasons ! In 
helping to solve the problem of 
cheating among students, educators 
can best render yeoman's service by 
concentrating, first of all, on how 
to eliminate those ways in which 
students are being cheated. Cheat- 
ing by students will lessen immeas- 
urably in an atmosphere of mutual 
respect between teacher and stu- 
dents, in an atmosphere in which 
learning experiences are personally 
meaningful, in an atmosphere in 
which emphasis is continually 
placed on the acceptance of individ- 
ual responsibility, in an atmos- 
phere in which creativity, initia- 
tive, imagination, and individuality 
are stressed, and in an atmosphere 
in which excellence according to 
one's abilities is constantly ex- 
pected. 

There is a growing consensus 
that cheating by students will 
diminish in proportion to the de- 
gree that there is less cheating 
perpetrated by those who are re- 
sponsible for planning the learning 
experiences of students. Meaning- 
ful opportunities for honest, indi- 
vidualized effort at the school and 
college level, rather than platitudin- 
ous moralizing, should strike a 
telling blow to practices of cheating 
by overwrought students. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



New Ratifications Activate Education Compact 



The Interstate Compact for Edu- 
cation became a reality on Febru- 
ary 18 when Governors John H. 
Chafee of Rhode Island and Jack 
M. Campbell of New Mexico signed 
legislation placing their states 
under the compact. 

The states were the 10th and 
11th to join the compact. Ten 
states were needed to make the 
compact official. Govs. Chafee and 
Campbell signed the bills in Santa 
Fe and Providence during a three- 
way conversation with Terry San- 
ford at his law office in Raleigh. 

Following the signing Sanford 
told news reporters that "it is 
most appropriate this conversation 
reaches across the country and 
party lines." Chafee is a Republican 
and Campbell a Democrat. "This is 
not a partisan thing," Sanford said. 
"The compact is off and running." 

Sanford told the newsmen that 
the compact "is out of my hands 
now. My part was to push it along 
until it became a reality." 

A 30-member steering committee 
is slated to meet in Santa Fe March 
29-30 to select an executive director 
for the compact which will have a 
staff of about 12 persons. 
Name Chairman 

In December the steering com- 
mittee, including 10 governors and 
leaders at all levels of education, 
met in New York City and started 
the formal process of launching 
the Compact for Education. They 
elected Gov. Chafee as chairman 
and adopted a six-month budget of 
$147,000. At that time the steering 
committee made it plain that the 
compact would be a clearing house 
for information and make recom- 
mendations to the states and the 
Federal government but would not 
make policy decisions. It said that 
recommendations would include the 
dissenting views of the compact 
members. 

Sanford said the compact will 
provide a means for states to ex- 
change information and ideas on 
educational projects. "The com- 
mission will say here are five or 
six ways to accomplish a certain 
project," he said. "It will be up to 
the states as to which one they use. 
If we don't have this compact, 
Congress will say this is the one 
way to do it." 



The other members of the com- 
pact are Arkansas, Hawaii, New 
Jersey, Minnesota, Illinois, Texas, 
New Hampshire, and the Virgin 
Islands. The North Carolina Legis- 
lature has not met since the idea 
of the compact was finalized. 

The compact program has been 
financed through a $150,000 grant 
from the Carnegie Corp. and the 
Danforth Foundation. Sanford was 
selected to spearhead its organiza- 
tion. As state legislatures ratify 
the compact, state funds will be 
appropriated for its support. 



Guidelines . . . 

( Continued from page 1 ) 

the Department of Justice indi- 
cates the court orders do not meet 
current judicial standards. 

By April 15 school units must 
send the State Department of 
Public Instruction — for forward- 
ing to the United States Office of 
Education — estimates 'of next 
year's enrollments and profession- 
al staff assignments by race, 
grade, and school. Those having 
freedom of choice plans may file 
revised figures 15 days after 
schools have opened. Forms for 
reporting the estimates are to be 
mailed to each school system. 

Principal "thrusts" of the new 
requirements Barus listed as pupil 
integration, "substantial progress 
from where we are now — the dual 
system must go"; professional 
staff desegregation, "there must be 
proof of some staff desegregation 
in each school"; and the closing 
of small and inadequate schools 
established under the segregated 
system. 

Sample plans resulting in de- 
segregation accomplishments by 
various school systems over the 
country have been collected and 
are available from the USOE, he 
said. As an example Barus cited 
the "pairing" of two elementary 
schools in the same area — one 
formerly for Negroes, the other 
for white. All pupils in grades one 
through three were sent to one 
school, those in grades five 
through six were assigned to the 
other. 



Staffer Gets Citizen Award 

Lewis Lane of Fuquay Springs 
and a staff member of the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
was named the Young Man of the 
Year in his home town last month, 
an annual award given by the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce. 

Lane is an assistant coordinator 
in the Civil Defense Adult Educa- 
tion Section of the Division of In- 
structional Services. The Jaycees 
at Fuquay Springs cited him for 
his work as State Education Chair- 
man in that organization, for his 
activities in civil defense, scouting, 
recreation, and as a member of the 
Fuquay-Varina Rural Fire Depart- 
ment. 



In Large Cities 

With regard to de facto, or 
geographic, segregation in the 
North and West, Barus said the 
guidelines "do not deal with the 
sometimes even more difficult ra- 
cial problems in our larger cities 
which have not maintained for- 
mally established separate white 
and Negro schools." He added that 
Federal officials are currently 
gathering data on segregation 
problems in over two dozen of 
the large northern cities. 

Dr. William J. Holloway ex- 
plained Title IV programs under 
which Federal funds may be made 
available to aid integration. These 
included technical assistance, 
grants to local school boards, and 
institutes on college and univer- 
sity campuses. He cited a Ran- 
dolph County project which 
brought school administrators and 
teachers together during the sum- 
mer to discuss reorganization of 
the school system and work on 
problems they knew they would 
face in September. "When school 
opened teachers were more in- 
formed and there were greater ac- 
complishments than in many other 
areas," Holloway said. 

Some systems have used grants 
to help teachers secure an improved 
quality of speech, pai-ticularly 
Negro teachers with poor speech 
habits, he said. Others have 
sought to bridge the knowledge 
gap between students of different 
schools to be integrated. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



New Loan Program Makes College Available to 
All Scholastically Acceptable Tar Heel Youth 



Any North Carolina youngsters 
who are scholastically able to get 
into college may borrow the money 
to pay for their college education 
under the Federal-State-private 
program announced by Gov. Dan 
K. Moore on February 24. 

Known as the Higher Education 
Financial Assistance program, it 
will be administered by the State 
Board of Higher Education and 
utilize the Federal Higher Educa- 
tion Act of 1965. The program will 
entitle almost any student to bor- 
row up to $5,000 for undergraduate 
study or up to $7,500 for graduate 
work. Private institutions will lend 
the money, the State will guarantee 
the loan, and the Federal govern- 
ment will pay most of the interest. 

A prospective student will make 
his request to the financial-aid 
officer of the college he selects. The 
officer, after determining if the 
student can get in college, will send 
a statement of eligibility to the 
State Education Assistance Author- 
ity. The authority will arrange the 
loan from a private institution and 
the money will be paid directly to 
the college. 

Interest Paid 

The Federal government will pay 
all interest up to six percent while 
the student is in college and three 
percent afterwards. The student 
does not have to start paying the 
money back until nine months after 
graduation, or three years after 
graduation if he enters the armed 
forces, the Peace Corps, or graduate 
school. He has 15 years to pay the 
money back after the execution of 
the note. 

Gov. Moore designated the Col- 
lege Foundation, Inc., a non-profit 
lending agency, as the chief lender 
under the program, although stu- 
dents may make the insured loans 
directly with private banking insti- 
tutions. 

The foundation represents 92 
banking institutions in the State — 
some 85 percent of the State's 
total banking assets. 

The Federal government has 
already allocated to North Carolina 
$500,000 through 1967 which will 
be sufficient to insure $5 million in 



loans. The State's lending insti- 
tutions — working through the Col- 
lege Foundation — have already 
made $3 million available for such 
loans. 

Gov. Moore has urged savings 
and loan, insurance and consumer 
finance industries, foundations, 
credit unions and other financial 
institutions in the State to "parti- 
cipate and make funds available 
for student loans under this 
partnership arrangement involving 
Federal, State, and private re- 
sources." "I can think of no better 
way for you to invest your money 
than to pledge it to the use of our 
young men and women for the 
attainment of that pearl of great 
price — an education," the governor 
said when announcing the program. 
Among First 

North Carolina is among the 
first states to implement existing 
Federal law in this field with the 
necessary State legislation and 
cooperating private capital. The 
1965 North Carolina General As- 
sembly created the State Education 
Assistance Authority and Gov. 
Moore activated it with the ap- 
pointment of seven directors. The 
directors are: 

Victor Bell, Jr., Raleigh bank 
official and chairman of the Col- 
lege Foundation, Inc., for a term 
ending January 18, 1970. 

Roger Grant, Jr., Glen Raven 
textile manufacturer, for a term 
ending January 18, 1968. 

Mrs. Carrie Harper, A & T Col- 
lege student aid officer, for a term 
ending January 18, 1967. 

Watts Hill, Jr., Durham insur- 
ance company president and chair- 
man of the Board of Higher Edu- 
cation, for a term ending January 
18, 1969. 

Senator Russell Kirby of Wilson, 
for a term ending January 18, 
1969. 

Dr. Arthur Wenger, president of 
Atlantic Christian College and the 
North Carolina Association of Col- 
leges and Universities, for a term 
ending January 18, 1967. 

H. Edmunds White, Davidson 
College student aid officer, for a 
term ending January 18, 1968. 



History Clubs In State's 
Schools Now Exceed 100 

For the first time since the 1953 
General Assembly created the Tar 
Heel Junior Historian Association, 
the number of clubs in the schools 
of the State have surpassed 100. 

The State Department of Ar- 
chives and History reported on 
March 1 that there are now 102 
clubs with a membership of 3,262 
— chiefly seventh grade students 
because that is the grade in which 
North Carolina history is being 
taught. 

Purpose of the Tar Heel Junior 
Historian Association is to encour- 
age the study of local and State 
history. Club members engage in 
such projects as collecting old 
coins, Indian arrowheads, early 
farming implements, and similar 
artifacts; constructing models of 
wagons, canoes, and early houses ; 
making maps; presenting historical 
dramas; taking field trips to local 
museums, cemeteries, and histori- 
cal houses; writing local history 
articles; and discussing the com- 
munity's past. 

Awards Program 

Each club receives a charter. 
Members receive the Tar Heel 
Junior Historian, a quarterly mag- 
azine, membership cards, and may 
purchase a club pin. The clubs may 
borrow slides and films from the 
North Carolina Museum of History 
in Raleigh. Each year the North 
Carolina Literary and Historical 
Association sponsors an awards 
program for the junior historians 
and the winners are invited to 
Raleigh as honored guests at a 
luncheon. The winning entries are 
placed on display in the North 
Carolina Museum of History. 

The junior historian movement 
has become popular in many states. 
North Carolina, along with New 
York, Texas, and Pennsylvania, 
was among the pioneers. Member- 
ship begins anew each school year. 
During 1964-65 there were 72 
clubs. 

Junior historian clubs are con- 
ducted through the State Depart- 
ment of Archives and History and 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Ten Tar Heel Citizens Make Up New Board For 
Governor's School; Salem Selected As Site 



Ten leading citizens of North 
Carolina were appointed last month 
by the State Board of Education 
to serve as the Board of Governors 
of the State-supported Governor's 
School for exceptionally talented 
children. 

As Public School Bulletin went 
to press, the new board was pre- 
paring to meet to select a chairman 
and vice chairman for the year, 
consider policies of administration 
and supervision, discuss staff, and 
decide on dates for the fourth 
school term to be held again this 
summer on the campus of Salem 
College in Winston-Salem. 

The board members are: 

Dr. Eugene Burnette, Raleigh, 
supervisor of the Education for 
Exceptionally Talented Section, 
State Department of Public In- 
struction ; 

Dr. Alphonso Elder, Durham, 
former president of North Caro- 
lina College; 

Sam Ervin, III, Morganton at- 
torney and State legislator; 



Dr. Elmer H. Garinger, Char- 
lotte legislator and former super- 
intendent of the Charlotte-Mecklen- 
burg school system ; 

Dr. Dale H. Gramley, Winston- 
Salem, president of Salem College; 

Mrs. Lewis R. Holding, Raleigh; 

Mrs. Frank A. McClenaghan, 
Charlotte; 

Tom C. Roberson, Asheville, 
superintendent of the Buncombe 
County Schools ; 

Marvin Ward, Winston-Salem, 
superintendent of Winston-Salem/ 
Forsyth schools; and 

Mrs. J. Paul Young, Asheville. 

The school first opened in the 
summer of 1963 with foundation 
funds. It is now supported entirely 
by the State with $180,000 having 
been budgeted for the 1966 term. 
To date approximately 1,200 espec- 
ially gifted students from through- 
out the State have been given the 
opportunity to pursue courses and 
educational experiences not avail- 
able in their regular school pro- 
gram. 



School Administrators . . . 

(Continued from page 1 ) 
proposed readjustment of curricu- 
lum so that "our youngsters are 
getting the same — and more — 
schooling in 11 years than they've 
been getting in 12 years." He 
reasoned that children start pre- 
school classes at an earlier age; 
more students are going on to some 
form of post-high school education; 
an expansion of nonschool educa- 
tional experiences through mass 
media and travel is advancing the 
educational level of pupils; stu- 
dents are getting more education 
per school day; subject matter is 
being introduced to pupils earlier; 
expanded summer schools are mov- 
ing us closer to an all-year school 
program ; and one less year in the 
school cycle would ease the growing 
school-finance burden, let teachers 
do a better job, and ease classroom 
and teacher shortages. 

National Testing 
Skepticism was voiced by a panel 
of school officials of a Carnegie- 
financed national education assess- 
ment proposal explained by Ralph 



W. Tyler, director, Center for Ad- 
vanced Study in the Behavioral 
Sciences at Stanford, Calif. The 
panel doubted that a testing pro- 
gram could be developed which 
would give an accurate assessment, 
warned that assessment, instead of 
helping education, could seriously 
damage it, said the proposed ap- 
proach to assessment is inconsist- 
ent, that Tyler's program is "doom- 
ed to failure," and called the pro- 
gram "a recipe for control by the 
few." 

Harold Howe II, new U. S. Com- 
missioner of Education, disagreed. 
In an earlier talk he said an ef- 
fective assessment program can be 
developed and "it will not involve 
a national testing program." He 
said he was in favor of a kind of 
sampling of achievement. "We are 
going to have to give Congress 
some answers in order to spend 
several billion dollars for the im- 
provement of schools," he added. 
On Negotiations 

Uncertainties reportedly domin- 
ated some 16 sessions — either live 
or on closed circuit TV — on profes- 
sional negotiations. Finis E. Engle- 



man, former AASA executive secre- 
tary, urged superintendents to take 
an active role in negotiations, 
neither as the agent of the board 
nor of the teaching group. He said 
today's school administrator must 
consider himself to be somewhat of 
an "expert witness" who provides 
both sides with advice, counseling, 
and guidance. 

Natt B. Burbank, associate pro- 
fessor of education at Lehigh 
University and a former AASA 
president, urged superintendents to 
be flexible and made it clear that 
some form of negotiations is in- 
evitable. Three important tasks 
required of the superintendent he 
listed as helping teachers com- 
municate more effectively with the 
board, providing the board with 
information and advice to enable it 
to comprehend teacher points of 
view, and helping the community to 
accept the emerging professional- 
ism of teachers. 

Blocking Change 

Participants in a discussion ses- 
sion on "Who's Blocking Educa- 
tional Change?" concluded that 
there are many reasons why educa- 
tional innovations sometimes can- 
not get off the ground — and most 
of them are human. The U. S. 
Office of Education came in for 
some criticism, charged with as- 
suming programs are of nation 
wide significance and forcing uni- 
form programs on all states without 
conferences at the regional, state, 
or local levels. 

It was said that teachers are 
rebellious of "too many opportuni- 
ties" — resenting the amount of time 
required, after a full teaching and 
preparation work load, to learn new 
techniques and effect innovation 
someone else has thought up; that 
colleges and universities are ad- 
vocating ideas and patterns they 
cannot demonstrate on their cam- 
puses. 

John L. Buford, retired superin- 
tendent of Mount Vernon, 111., and 
Edgar Fuller, executive secretary of 
the Council of Chief State School 
Officers, warned that continued 
Federal support for nonpublic 
schools could turn America's uni- 
fied education system into a "divi- 
sive one" which subordinates the 
public school to denominational and 
other private schools. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Report Reveals Great Need in State's Schools 
For Teachers of Educable Mentally Retarded 



An estimated 35,446 educable 
mentally retarded children are en- 
rolled in the public schools of North 
Carolina, it is revealed in a report 
recently released by Felix S. 
Barker, supervisor of the Special 
Education Section, Division of In- 
structional Services, of the State 
Department of Public Instruction. 

These are youngsters who are 
too slow for regular academic work, 
but who can be expected to find a 
place in normal society. They re- 
present three percent of the total 
1,181,552 enrollment for the first 
school month of the current acade- 
mic year. If a special teacher were 
to be provided for every 15 of these 
slow learners, the recommended 
teacher-pupil ratio in these special 
classes, North Carolina would need 
to have 2,363 teachers. 
Teaching Now 

Actually, there are currently 861 
State-allotted special teachers serv- 
ing around 14,000 educable mental- 
ly retarded children. In addition, 
there are 64 such teachers provided 
through local supplements or local 
community organizations. These 
925 teachers are located in 160 of 
the State's 169 school systems. 

Apparently more than three- 
fifths of these children are either 
not now in school or are enrolled 
in regular classes where the pro- 
gram is not geared to meet their 
needs. Barker said superintendents 
are asking for more classes for 
these youngsters, especially at the 
high school level where programs 
are being developed in cooperation 
with the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation. 

As an example, the special edu- 
cation director in the Charlotte- 
Mecklenburg system, the State's 
largest, has asked his school 
board for 25 additional special 
education teachers, therapists, and 
coordinators for next year. Over 
half of these are needed to teach 
the educable mentally handicapped, 
he said. 

There is a waiting list of more 
than 200 students for these classes 
in this one school system, accord- 
ing to Special Education Director 
H. Jay Hicks. He said principals 
have bean begging for more classes, 



because these slower students make 
teaching difficult in a class of 
normal students. Dr. Barker said 
similar conditions exist over the 
State. 

Dropouts 

Educators say many of the adoles- 
cents dropping out of school are 
the mentally retarded, the majority 
of them leaving school systems 
which do not have programs to 
meet their needs — such as pre- 
vocational training. 

The study, going back to 1957- 
58, shows a rather slow increase in 
the number of teachers for the 
educable mentally retarded through 
1961-62. Beginning with the 1962- 
63 school year, there has been a 
substantial increase through the 
present biennium, 1965-67, with the 
number of State-allotted teachers 



for the 1966-67 school year being 
1,061. It is estimated that 15,915 
students will be served through 
these special classes next year. 
Needs Projected 

The State is being requested to 
supply 200 additional teachers for 
each year of the next biennium, the 
projections being based on the 
growth of the program during the 
past few years and on estimates 
of the total number of educable 
mentally retarded children expected 
to enroll. These projections still 
will not meet the total needs within 
the years plotted, but should, with- 
in one or two additional biennia, 
reach an optimum level and begin 
to level off, Barker said. 

The projection calls for 1,261 
State-allotted special teachers for 
1967-68 to teach an estimated 
18,915 educable mentally retarded 
children and for 1,461 teachers in 
1968-69 for 21,915 students. 



Scholarships Help Train Teachers of Retarded 

Until a few years ago there were no colleges in the State prepared 
to certify teachers in the mentally retarded field and nearly all of 
the teachers being recruited to teach these special classes were 
certified in some area of study other than mental retardation. 

Today there are seven North Carolina colleges offering complete 
programs for teachers of the mentally retarded and several others 
offer some courses in this area. However, it is estimated that only 
about 50 percent of the 925 teachers of the educable mentally 
retarded during the current year have had any training in mental 
retardation — and that only 10 percent are certified in this field. 

Those were the observations of Morris C. Brown, supervisor of 
Teacher Recruitment, Scholarship, and Placement for the State 
Department of Public Instruction, as he reviewed the scholarship 
program for teachers of the mentally retarded which was estab- 
lished by the General Assembly in 1963. The program has brought 
about improvement, he said, but there still remains much to be 
done. 

Through February 9, vouchers totaling $105,639 had been written 
on the scholarship fund for the benefit of 373 individuals taking 
some training in the mental retardation field. The greatest portion, 
$63,534, was for summer work. Under this phase of the program a 
teacher of the mentally retarded may receive up to $300 for 12 
weeks of study in summer school. 

A total of $7,080 had been awarded in scholarship funds for 
extension courses in mental retardation and $35,025 had been 
awarded to regular school term students. Currently there are 22 
recipients of scholarships taking mentally retarded training as 
full-time college students. A regular college student may receive 
up to $900 — or $25 per semester hour — during a nine-months school 
term. 

For full information on the scholarship program, prospective 
teachers of the mentally retarded should write: Scholarship for 
Teachers of the Mentally Retarded, State Department of Public 
Instruction, Raleigh, N. C. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



o re 

Hb O 

in o" 

ct- 3 
fl> 3 



en 



£ft 

PC* 

5? 3 
ft ca _q 

2. oi 

O <73 



. c 

3* p. 
(T> ft) 

^. 3 

3 

3 



CO 



!_■■ 

to 

3- w, 

r| 

02 (I> 



CO 



3 

ct 3 

3" a- 

<X> ft) 

HH 3 
3^ ct 

3" 

» "S 
pr" ^ 

o 

2.Hb 

CO 3 
H» ^ 

5 3 

fD ft) 



3 3 

3 O 

o £-co 
no oo 

sT 3' to 

re >-> c-t- 

<-t 3 



00 ja- & 

^ re re 



fD 



-3 

o to 



5:8 

to 3 
3- 3 
to 



P -3 

a re 
3 ^ 

EL* 

clB 

as 



3 
re re 



CO 

o 3' 2. 

ct C 

~ re re 

%» 
GO o 5T 

rt- 3 

P 3 

ffl << re 

P "• 

P- 

3 h> 



03 3 

I ft) 



co re 



& -J 



S-g 

o * 

O M 

co 3 



t-h 3^ 

re 
el- 
s' <-;• 

re C 
3 



re 



p „ g 
re p 

' 3 M> 

a? 

co S 

3 £: 
S'3 

»-< re 






i-3 "3 W 

^2 1-2 H" 

5p < 

ft a » 
2- co 



O 
§ | 

CO '« 

ft co" 

re 
3 



oo£ 

ft -* 
>■ <s 

as 

03 CO 

p 

I* 

§ 3: 
re ?f 



re p 
re 
co oq 



3 H^. 

re 003 



CO e-t 

K- 3- 
3 re 
re i-S 

re re 
ty p 

p CO 

•* 3- 

re 
CL re 
P 3 
ct 

re co 

" o 



1 p re 



to re 



a P 



CO 



p 



Co L S 

?£ 3^ 2. 

s 2- £/ 



<= 



to c 



o 
< 
re 

3 

re 
£J 3 



CO 

CO p 

re 

8 3 

3* re 

p P 

CO H 



re 3- 

&■ o 

c 

p w 

o 



y re 
re << 

CO o 



on o 

2- 2 
o a 
2, § 



co 2- 

p 5' 

o 

t-t> co 
re 

3" < 

CD M. 

h- 1 re 

CO CO 

c* ^ 



O g: 

S. r 1 p 

&■ P 3 

M CO 

3 p 

re !tj co 

re fa c+ 

TJi — ^ 

re c+ J 

<. re r 

2 00 

re c-t- 

co p 

*i re 

2- hH 



co "3 
re P 



S' a re to 

P Q, -s 

3 2 v 

i-i re fo 

^ ° 3 2- 



re 
P re 



o 3" 

re 03 

3 — 

<rt- Ha 



3 ^.re 3 



* - M ® — 

a I. 

o J 3 

p ftp 



o re _ 

c n o 

3 r ; " 

CO 



2 co re 



re 

•3 -^ 

2 e- 
8 < 

3 O 
CD re 

CO CO 

co co 



3- 

p £, 



re 



3- © 

3 « 
p c 

3 
V5 co 

re re 

P " 

"■ 3 

p o^ 

«! " 

O o 

-■ 3 



re 

>? o jy 

rl- ^ P 



3 p cn 
2 1^ © 



re re 



•3 
r+ re 
3- -i 
o g 

3 



CO 



CO 



50 r+ 
O < 

,. O 



O P o 
hj co i-j 

» s.« 

rt- CT5 re 
3- 3 < 
P re re 
3 D- 3 



^ W 
re 

& O 

a- a 

co co 

Ms 

bdo 

^ M 

re co 

<n- en ' 

c+ en 

C73 
OS 



OS 

^3 
p g 

m» 2 

|-s 3 
O D- 

3 re 
Ei co 

3 c1 " 

re p 

hH 3 

!-s p 

h" ^ 

i- 3 o. 



CO ,Q p Oi| 

p S & 2 

3 K" ft g. 

Cl re <n- r 

S & 3* 

cL d- 3 

CQ © P 



p 3 
a re 



^3 

<-•■ s 

o re 
co 

re 

3 



o CO 

O 00 

c © 
3 

co co 

re c 

a "9 

» | 

s co 



E. 3 3 = 



P o 

35 r 



*d 



CO 



3 



rt M K W 

& S- re | 

re re i cr 



2*. 3 
q' re 

3 

EL o 

O 3 
^ 3 

H » s 

3 £L 
jn o 

re co 
re 

S^ 

3» 3- 
o o 
P 

<H- 

2 3 

3 re 






p 



o 

< 

re re 



o re h» 3 o^ 



SL P M 

„ 3 °° 

i-S CO 

co re re 

p 3 

<r+ re 

re co 



-3 
re 

re 
re P 



•t 1 ° 

2 = 

3^ £ -. 
re c73 



_ »-s 
p 

O CO 



S 3 
3 i-j 

CL O 



3- 
O 
3 
i-j 

H,h]0> 

3 3- 

r^ p a* 
■ t-i- 3 



co M , 
" 3 

Is 
IS 

co 

la 

3 

w d 

p m 
3 > 



3" 

P H 

«* 3- 

re 



CO 



3T© 

p 2 

o re ^ 

rr !-« 3 



^§ ft 
o 2. p 

3 r+ 3 
3 m & 
M. P 

3 3 

CQ 



3- 


5' 
P 


l . 





CO 


p 


p 


re 




r+ 


CO 


3 


CO 


C\3 


O 


c 






Hi 


3 

< 

re 




3 


re 




'<! 


3 


CO 


P 


r+ 




re 


re 


i-S 


3" 


P 


re 


o" 




re 


CO 


re 


H 


3" 







3 


CO* 


re 







3 "* 
3. re 
1 1 



re 



3> — re 
..are 



3- 

re 

? o 

P M 

2 re 



3 3 

re re « 

ct- 3 

w °- O 

re 2 3 
re 

o 



re 1 re re co 



3" 
re h- 
3- 

HH P 

s- 3 

re 

3 pi 

o 
3 p 

n- &. 
p 3 

re 3 

O kT 

HI p 

3" < 
re re 



CO 



re 



23 
p_ 3' 

3 CO 



3 1 g 

5 a 

3 
3 



co 



3 re co 

« re re 

5. 3 

£t- e-t- 3 

» P to 

w^ ^ 

o p 

io o co 



•3 OQ 

re _ hj 

i-s 2 * 

re 3; p 

re «< 
3 



2 3 



3" re 2 



(35 

• CO 



re 3 



3 C 
trcj co 



CO 
p 
re 3 



CO 
(H- _ 

P 3 
3 O 

P re 

3-5" 
co " 



re 



5.3 



3- 3' 

3 p 

C0 i-H 

hj re 

ct- 3 

< 2 

re 1 



w. P 

3 c+ 

^ re 
oq 

e co 

iZ. ct 

& £ 

p 3 

3 & 

re P 

re ^ 

p CO 

3 

CL HI, 

o 

re 1-3 
O 

3 p 

3 re 



re 

Hj 

P 

^T "3 
■d' re 

S H! 
ft re 

c- ft 

3 3 
3 S- 

_.. p 

oq 



re 



^ O 

Hb 

re 

hj re 

re o 

re 3 

3 3 



ct p re co 
3* 3 O re 
re 0.3 3; 

« s 3o 
ft 2 2 » 

*"* 3 g 
3 C L ~, 

S Sa^ 

^ g- CO HJ 



"> co 
re lies 



3 re 
p. re 

P 3 

i-S ct 
CL^ 
co 

»~ 3 
^ 2 3 ft 

ci»Q 2 

g.^ 51 ig 

— ' S 2 ft 
co 3 re 1 



oq 3' 

• cj 3 

re 

P Sq 

re S 



re 3 



P 

to rj 
re re 

HJ 

re 
o re 

Hb 3 



a. 
p 
ct 3 

P g 
3 
P 

ct 3 
3' p, 

re 
re 

>3 O 
re 3 

3 3 
re co 



CO go 

ct 2, 

P 3" 

re o 

CO CO 
ct 

p 

p^ 

p to 
'-s to 
P. 



CO 

■3 
h» re 

o HJ 

hj re 

re 

P 3 



re fD 

3 C. 

'p 3 
re 

o P 

Hb CO 



Hi 

o 

3- 2. 

re 3 

to 

"3 i 

re 

HJ 

re 
re 
3 

c-t 

p 
to 

re 



re 

p. 3 

ct-' re 

p re 

«*" w". 

5" 3' 
3 to 



a. 

Hj 

P O 

I 3 
S re 

Hb 3" 





3 


CO 

0' 


co 

3 


H- 


3 


re 


3; 


CO 


O 


CO 


^ 





CO 


3 


<-t 


3- 


re 


3 






p 


re 

3- 


3 

00 


Hi 




0' 


3 
re 

3 


3 
to' 


3 

CO 


3. 
re 


3- 

c-t 





3- C 

re re 



ct p 

o'to 
3 P 

o 3 ' 

O 3 
< ^ 

re r „ 

M 3- 

§1 

O Co 

a- 3- 
re 
3 p 

^HJ 

o 

■3 

3 



£S'g 

S p 
© co q 

pft-e 

i-3 o hj 

3- © Sj 
ft co ft) 

p ^_ 3 

3' rt ct 

O 3 d 3-: 

ct re 
re >a 

3 O CO- 
3"3 n - ' 
2 3 ft) 

Pi 



P O 



o p; 

_ o 

Pi a 

re s 

° c- 

re T5 
P 



re o o 



w CO O > 

? ??M 3 




: - -I 

: ill 






•/.•• 



w 

<?> 
to 

o 
o 
s 

en 
< rt 






H, t"T 
rt 

2 i 

3 rt) 

rt O 

O 



A- 3 

3 rt 

re 3- 

« r? 

c h- 

a in 

CO 

rt CO 

O p 

* 3 

O, 

Ha P 

2 S 

rt P- 



ft" ° 

3 o 

s 
33 

o S 

►5 JL 



O GL 



Oi o 
O Ha 

E rt. 

co 3 B 

g-» o 

^ Hi l-i 



c & 



CO 

o 

p p 

4 rt 

O rt 

5' a 

p c 



3 rS 

3 o 

P m 

3 

<T> 
ft. 



as 3 

~ 3 



b 

•3 
P 
rt 
rt- 

-3 

3 S 
3 * 

rt o 
Q- Ha 

Eg 



3 



fj to ,o 

3 a s 



P 3 



3 
cd .. 



p cc 

3 < 

rt rt> 

rt> 3 

• HH 

rt CO 

< p 

o' *" 



co 
o 
3 
3 jv, 

2.*? 

" - rt> 



p rt- 
CO 

?2. 



p 2 

rt- 

O 3 

3 rt> 

s & 

rt) 5 

rt- 3- 



CD 



2,-3- 

<s2 ® 



Ol 



3 hs 



o p 



3 



S.S 

* 3. 

rt 

3 



3> S> co 



p o 
rt Ha 



co 



rt) 

P p 

CD rt rt 

El- 3 d & 



3 d T3 
rt> rt> 

rt 

GO < 

rt- 3. 

p co 

c+ O 

rt) rt 



o 

o 
3 

3 

CO 

rt> 

>2 O 

1 C 1 

o & | 



rt S. 



3 y 



rt- |3 W 

3 d rt 3- 

rt _ O 

O <<< 

s s.1 

rt-<< rt 

3 

ggaS, 
p 5. 



< p, 
S.c 

l— o 

p p 

«LT rt- 



co 



CO 



rt 

3 2. 

3 m 

a" 

rt "3 

fj 3 d 

§ B 



3 

C rt 
i o 
S". s 

3 3 

3 to 
rt Q 

rt O 

O il 
3 CO 

3 I 

2- 3 d 
O rt 



co rt rt co 



o •> 
~- rt 

O rt- 

° B 
P 3 

— p 
» 2" 

o ft) 
3- kh 

la 



3 P, 



H, 3 

O 3- 



*->• co 

3 rt 

* ° 2 

«. S W 
p rt 

Ha S - O 

rt- p <- 

2 ^ rt 

* rt- * 

3^'rt » 

rt f-a ^ 
H ^ H 

p > «. 

e+ Ol P 

3 co • 
P rt 
— 3- 
O 
OO 
rt 

rt rt 
CO 3 

rt p 



« cj" si 

rt) 3 3" 

H ttq rt 
rt _^ 

rt ST ^ 

3 3 Oi 

et- 3 «3 
rt 

S" — , ° 

5 3 rt 

2 >-t 

S H- CO 

S » 3 
rt co co 



O rt a. 

Ha O rt) 

rt- 3 < 

3- 3 O 

w SS £ 

rt a 

P * 



— 2- p 

"•Iff 

E-f » 

T* rt 

Si ft 

3 2 rt 

rt El- o 
rt P S 

a 3-2 

a ^ 2- 



.w 

rt & 

2:^3 

co 5;o> 

i- 1 - rt- 

w >3 S 
O^ 3 oq 
10 £ 3 
'Soft 

2 p 

rt co 3 

3 3- ® 
rt- O p 



3- rt- 



3 P SS 
rt 3 p 

a- o 

rt co — 

rt- cr 
3 d K 



5' 

o 



rt) 



H H 

rt hj 

rt 

4^ 3 

-3 rt- 

°C« 



rta 3^ 

o o 



o'er- 

3 p 



O 

3- 

O 

o 

— 5 H 



o 
3 
3 

CO CD 

rt m 
o °° 

» E? 

5 -rt 

rt- 3 
tf 3 
rt 3 

2 % 



2". O 

= c 

o ». 



3 2 



<T> 



O 

O 

o 



rt vj 

' rt 



O 2- 3 ^ P 
Hi CO E-i co -' 



rt rD 
P 
p co 
£j rt 
rt Bj 



o- 
rt 

- ^2- 

rt rt . 

co 



:- 



3o 

^ 2 

n co 

O 3- 

3 O 

3 ^ 



rt 31 
S o 

-. 3 
3 



p ^ < 

rt- O S- 

H- 1 3 

rt- O 



co 3 d 



3^ & 



o 



co 



2, H- 

0? 



-3» 

3"ci0 

* ' 9 

9 

■<l. 



3- rt 
co hj 



CO 



o 

3 d 

o 

o 
co 
o 

04 a: o- 

2-^ «< 
co p 
co 



co irL 



p g; 
g.<D 

» s 

rt 



p 

CO CD 2 
rt- rt- P 

C C H 



jdort 
"OS I 

_ o < 

2^3- 
^ -1 o 
rt H » 
3 d rt 

o * 
Ha 1 (t> 

P 3 

rt £T. <-. 

3 O O 

2-o"3 



rt !-t- i^r 

rt — CD 

rt_ fD 

GO <J 

<! rt- < 

< p rt 

P rt- h- 

co rt rt 



< 3 
P 

CD O 

rt-' 

c-^ 
rt co 
co o 
<+ cr 
o 

w. O 

3 sr 
rt p 

3. co 

rt- rt- 

rt> 

g s 

^h 

3 d 
rt rt 
rt ►-. 



P «< o 



<n "o p 

rt o 3 
"•"On- 
Q- 3 
P p >o 



cr < 



S 5 H" 

o 3- 

l-S H 



rt 

< HH 

rt h-. 
P CT-J 

3 



p p rt 



co o* 

P 

P v- 



3 Z 

^& 
3 •• 
3' to 



£ 3 ^ 

o 

o 



3 o 

rt, 



rt co 

P Ol 

ct HO 

3S 
rt co 

rt H- 



rt> K> 

,a o 



2:0 

rt rt 



00 



3 3 (T> o 



CO TO 

rt 3 d co 
3 d 2 rt 

g 

-MO 
to <-> tr- 



3 co 



DO 



<DMo 

Hi t^. GO 

00 00 rt 



rt 

rt 

rtj (13 

rt T3 
3" O 



P rt- 
3 P 
El- J* 



CO o 

p 2 

H" s 

rt 3 

rt- 

w v; 

rt- 

p CO 

3 2- 

ft 2T 

p o 

rt 2. 

O- co" 
co 



<< vj 



3 Ha 

&0 Ol 

rt- |_i 

P 00 

rt _ 

rt 
rt O 
rt 3 
tO 3 
3 rt- 

rt) r „ 

3 CD 
o 
rt 3 d 
3 O 
rt- o 

co 3- 

*. . CD 



3 3 

rt 3 - 
^ rt 

a 3 



3 d ^ 

p 3 

3 co 

Q- 2 



o rt 
3 rt 

O rt 

? 3 

£3 

rt 
rt- 3 

5' CL 
3 rt 

rt Et- 



2. 
3 h- 
rt << 



— P 3 3 
^— i-n rt — • 



Q- 


rt- 


3 


OI 


CD 

rt 


3 


C 


00 


r+ 


rt 


2 


p 


CO 




CL 


^* 






TO 


3 


O 
Ha 


c 

3 
Do 


P 

r-t- 


3^ 
CO 



O 1— 



tQ p 
3 3 
P £u 



2- 

cr o co p 



»u 



CO 

O 

3 d 

O 

2-jj^ 



3 CO 

r .-3 
rt 



&- O w 
rt Ha 3 



to 

o 
to 



P 

3 a. b 



rt 3 



rt y 
p 35 
5T. rt 
< 
a en 

2 ^ 
2 © 

S o 



2 co 

5 rt- 

3 P 

CO rt- 

rt rt 
O 



3> tU 
rt »fc- 
Q-- 



3 O 



CD 
P 

3- rt 



co 3 

i-K C ~*~ H- r + 

o S3 2 % 

'"' 5 M 

El- 3 3 



p rt. 
3 i 

alrt 
p 3 

p- 2. 

co 



o 3 

3 rt 
rt ^ _ 



> 
o 
o 

o 

H i_j 

O QTQ 



P 
3 
O- 
P 
rt 

a- 
x 



E.5 

8-z 

3 o 

7p 

-1 o 

X ■" 
o o 

3 — 
3 3 

o o 

Zw 
o 

fl) 3" 
O o 

Q-O 




3 d T 



a^ 



■ '<; 



3 *3 rt 
rt o 

rt 3 



3 _ 
Oq h, 



co 3. 

CO rt- " 



3 3> 



o 3 
3 rt 

pS 

CO 



hi 





• 01 



■M 



"ml 

S (I 



1 3 d 

> rt 

rt 

CD 

•3 
rt 
rt 
o 
(D 
3 



O 
3 

rt o 

g 3 

rt a 

S g 

E- rt) 



co 3 2 

rl- 



O rt 

o 

a 
3 



o p rt- 
rt 3 ct-" 

rt a, o 
3- rt ^ 
„ rt 

3 s 
» 3 o 

rt- 2. 
3 d rh (JQ 

[0 B S. 

H-K P" °- 

2- 2 3 

3 rt 



O rt rtj h-i 
w, rt rt) rf^ 



rt TJ 
rt rt) 
3 rt 
rt- O 
rt) 
3 
* «* 

rt * 
CD 2 

rt 

rt) 



2T 3 - 

rt o 

P 

►3 ri- 
P O* 
3-3 



3 2 

<i> 2 

_ rt- 

rt vj 

O 1 

3 J? 



rt) 



S cr —. 

-jv; 3 

- o 

3 P 



3 03 



CO 



o rt 
-3 
cr P 
rt rt 
o P 
o 



o 

m 3> 



rt " 
co rt 



^ 3 
rt 1 



3 • tT ^ p 



p p 



~ P 
» rt 






rt 



-. — 3- rt 

Jo cr n 

33 ►-. CD o 

a p co 



rt 
3 a 

■5 



Q- 
Sal 



1 J yO 

-. <o c-q 5' 

3 3 CO 

rt h-. 

!+• 2- °- bd 

- ' ; 3 d m P 

■i D rt 3 *_" 

. ; rt rt m 

>: d 2". rt & 

'- b O rt" 

1 3 w -^ 



&&£ 



■3 rt. p w 

rt g CO rt 

rt> CKJ CO CD 

o H o 

3 rt- 2 3 

rt o ■ 

5' 3 S - 

H Q^ rt . 

3 d rt- H- 

«) o 5 tr 

3 09 

3> m. rt rt 
rt 3 



a 



o 

rt h, 3 

O 



p M 

3- 



co rt 
rt o 

rt 3 

co co 
rt 

p g" 

3 oq 
O- ^ 



3^ rt 
* O 

H, 

< rt 

rt 3. 



p 

3 



a- to 



cr co 

cd ^> 

trr rt 

1 3 

rt GO 

rt 

3 sr 

<n rt 



a 



h: 
3 rt 
P 

CO rt 
rt o 

3 
53 



rt 3 



O hj 

H, rt 



rt O 

O 

rt 
GO 



3 p 

«> g 

rt ~ 



2- <* 

rt 



CO p 

rt 
rt 



3-2 3 

rt 1 



rt K-. 

a "3 



H rt 


a* 




to 






H M 


0^ 


4b 


to 






SI 

> + 


OS J*, to 




(/I 






Si 








© 






oS 















000 













3*i 




*- 





to 









cn 


4- 



O 

t'o 






1-40 
1-60 
1-10 


O 
to 




3- 


O 






r 1 
















r 

















r 


000 







CO c 

5 




1 

(n 


































O 


00 






to 






o> 






to 














I 


M «j 


9) 


■CO 


^ 


<£■ 




M CO 


up 







-J 




O CO 


cn to au 






® OS 


to 


■-£> 


te 


4- 




00 -.j 


CO 





*"* 


-J 




Iv V 


■x --c ■:/ 


-1 




O 
































rt 




O 


1 5° 












I'd 












H* 






O 

H 5 




N 


«a 


ee 


T> 


en 






O CO 


C7I 


«n 


>t» 






O CO 


CO r- J— 






in 


1**. 0D 





4* 


GO 


to 




to -x> 


to 


to 


t3> 






1— CO 


-J IO M 






M tn 


CO 


<X> 


O 


rf* 




en 93 


<* 




00 


r— 


n 


cn v 


4* GC SO 


CO 


a ~. 
to a 




> 

Z 
O 












-4 












O 










O 












> 












c 










■•™ 
























z 








B 


^ 


CO 

-t 
C 


w — 


i_ 








m 


10 










-H 


H- 






s 




V 


to 


OJ 


-J 


to 




ty« en 


*J 


o- 


on 


to 


-< 


co cn 


cn ►- M 




^ 




1— > to 


CO 




to 

4* 


<Jl 




A O 

CO 00 


O 
00 


CO 


00 




CO 


5" ^ - 


to >U ^ 

00 CO *h 


Id 


3 




O 


OO CO 


•--I 


to 


-J 






tO A 


■£> 





CO 


to 




cn -^ 


-4 00 CO 


QD 




rn 


ro 


CO 





1— 


to 

to 




cn 4- 


cn 


<£> 


CO 


at* 

to 




-t to 


00 H OO 


00 


3 

w 

ft 3 




Z 

—1 

O 
O 

c 
z 


I to CO 


CO 





to 







to to 


O 


O 


to 


O 




CO CO 


l^ H- tO 


cn 


1 




» 1— 




*•. 


CI 


CO 




-^ 00 


CO 


CO 


*» 


O0 

M 




CO CO 


H- tO « 


CO 


r 1 r? 




cn 

m 

r- 

O 

73 

73 


-*a -m 


Go 


oa 


•-1 


to 




-J *a 


cn 


cn 


•^ 


to 




-J -^ 


co cn -1 


t£> 




> 


m 00 


to 


to 


Oi 






a> at 








ab- 




X O 


lfk> -J -4 






**■ a 


to 


Iffci 





00 




to 00 


00 


00 


at* 


OO 




00 00 


cn to rt. 


OO 


B n 

V) « 




O 



> ?^ 



NO 

OS 
Os 




Exchange Teachers Evaluate Experience In 
Charlotte, Burlington, and Bladen Schools 



In evaluating their experiences 
of six weeks in three different 
North Carolina school systems, 
three exchange teachers from Indo- 
nesia and Iran were liberal in their 
praise and positive in their sug- 
gestions for improvement. Systems 
visited were Charlotte, Burlington 
and Bladen County. 

The visitors were impressed with 
the excellent facilities and good 
equipment which were found in 
each school system, and were 
pleased that data processing was 
already in use in a number of 
North Carolina schools. They found 
that schools, for the most part, 
were clean and well-kept; that stu- 
dents were well-behaved, well- 
groomed, and eager to learn ; and 
that there seemed to be little waste 
of time on the part of teachers or 
students. 

"Giving responsibility to stu- 
dents was perhaps the most signifi- 
cant thing I observed in the Char- 
lotte schools," declared Chuan Hong 
Wee, from Singapore. "I found 
students who had purpose in attend- 
ing school and who were almost 
always gainfully occupied. I was 
partially impressed with the close 
teacher-student relationships which 
I observed — something spontane- 
ous, genuine, and affectionate. I 
also discovered how interested in 
education were civic groups, the 
school board, and the churches." 
Free Discussion 

In Burlington Miss Haji Rahmati 
was pleased to find boys in home 
economics classes, free discussion 
and exchange of ideas in a number 
of classes, and excellent school- 
home relationships. "More than 
anything else I liked the excellent 
working relations which I found to 
exist between students and their 
teachers." 

In Bladen County Mohammad 
Shamashir Saz, also of Iran, made 
more than 40 personal appear- 
ances in which he spoke to inter- 
ested students and adult citizens; 
attended several churches; and 
visited in many homes, especially 
farm homes. "I was very much 
impressed with the widespread 
knowledge of scientific farming 
which I encountered ; with the 



superior extension services which 
are available; and with the many 
agricultural services which are 
also available," he said. 

Each of the exchange teachers 
observed that American students, 
by and large, are unacquainted 
with other nationalties — their geo- 
graphic habitation, their contri- 
butions to mankind, their current 
problems. This widespread un- 
awareness, they suggested, afforded 
American educators one of their 
greatest opportunities and responsi- 
bilities at all levels of education. 
"Responsible action at the local, 
national, or international level is 
possible only when well-informed 
individuals are able to share their 
ideas in an atmosphere of mutual 
respect," declared Chuan Hong 
Wee of the State of Singapore. 



Democracy Institutes 
Planned For Summer 

Institutes on Constitutional De- 
mocracy and Totalitarianism, spon- 
sored by the North Carolina Ed- 
ucational Council on National 
Purposes, Inc., will be held at East 
Carolina College and at Appala- 
chian State Teachers College this 
summer. 

Dates for the institute at ECC 
in Greenville are June 6 to July 12 
and at ASTC in Boone the dates 
are July 18 to August 12. 

The institutes are designed to 
prepare North Carolina social 
studies teachers to teach about 
communism. They also offer spe- 
cialized training to liberal arts 
students in political science and 
related fields by seeking to com- 
pare the ideals and institutions of 
democratic systems with those of 
totalitarian states. 

The nine quarter hours of credit 
offered by the institutes may count 
toward a graduate or undergradu- 
ate degree or toward teacher cer- 
tification. A limited number of 
scholarship grants will be avail- 
able. Interested persons should 
write to C. Alden Baker, Execu- 
tive Director, North Carolina Edu- 
cational Council on National Pur- 
poses, Inc., P. O. Box 988, Raleigh, 
N. C. 



Franklin Board Decision 
Upheld By Federal Court 

Judge Algernon L. Butler of the 
U. S. Eastern District Court in 
Raleigh on February 24 refused to 
issue an order allowing 20 Negro 
children in Franklin County to 
transfer immediately to white 
schools of their choice. 

Parents of the children had 
sought an injunction against the 
Franklin County school board, con- 
tending requests for reassignment 
at the beginning of the school year 
were denied "solely on the basis" 
of the students' race and color. 

The suit represents the first 
court challenge of a civil rights 
compliance plan approved by the 
U. S. Office of Education. The U. S. 
Justice Department, allowed to in- 
tervene in the case, argued that a 
plan of gradual integration vio- 
lates the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 

The Franklin County plan per- 
mitted first, second, ninth and 12th 
grade students to enroll in the 
school of their choice at the start 
of the 1965 school year. The plan 
will permit all students freedom 
of choice in the 1966 school year. 
None of the 20 children were en- 
rolled in the above grades. 
Published Plan 

The school board published its 
compliance plan, but did not pub- 
lish the information that students 
in grades other than first, second, 
ninth and 12th had to show they 
wished to take a course not avail- 
able in the school they were at- 
tending or that they had changed 
residence to qualify for a transfer 
— the plan's two requirements for 
reassignment in other than the 
above grades. However, the court 
pointed out, these conditions were 
cited by the Office of Education in 
its statement on the compliance 
plan, which was available to the 
public. 

The 20 Negro students were de- 
nied transfers by the school board 
because they did not show they met 
either of the two requirements. 
Judge Butler said that "they 
neither then nor at two later meet- 
ings in October, 1965 indicated 
their desire for lateral transfers 
on either of the two grounds." 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



State Staffer Presides Over National Meeting 



Participating in the twenty- 
fourth annual conference of the 
National Council of State Con- 
sultants in Elementary Education 
were Madeline Tripp, president 
of the organization; and Nedra 
Mitchell and Marie Haigwood, con- 
sultants in elementary education 
with the State Department of 
Public Instruction. The conference 
was held in San Francisco, March 
9-12. 

Through addresses, panels and 
roundtable discussion groups the 
theme of the conference, "In- 
novation and the State De- 
partment Consultant: Challenge, 
Opportunity, Responsibility," was 
explored. 

Among the chief speakers were 
Dr. Harold Spears, superintendent 
of the San Francisco Public Schools, 
who discussed, "Calling Signals for 
the Elementary Schools;" Dr. Hilda 
Taba, professor, San Francisco 
State College, whose topic was 
"Feedback from Research as an 
Implementation of Innovation;" 
and Dr. Lorrene Love Ort, profes- 
sor, Bowling Green State Univer- 
sity, who spoke on "What Is 
Important?" 

Miss Haigwood served on a 
panel entitled, "Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act: Exciting 
Developments — U.S.A."; and Miss 
Mitchell introduced Dr. Ort and 
served on two committees: the 
program and hospitality commit- 
tees. 

Staff members from the U. S. 
Office of Education — for one entire 
conference — assisted conference 
delegates in understanding more 
thoroughly the implications of the 
Elementary and Secondary Edu- 
cation Act. In charge of this meet- 
ing was Dr. Paul Blackwood. 

During the conference Dr. Ray- 
mond A. Roberts, State Depart- 
ment of Education, Missouri, was 
installed as president. 

North Carolina and the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
are to be congratulated on having 
one of its members, Miss Madeline 
Tripp, serve as president of the 
National Council of State Consult- 
ants in Elementary Education; and 
upon having Misses Haigwood and 
Mitchell serve in important capaci- 



ties in the organization. The per- 
sonnel of this group are recognized 
as dynamic leaders on the national 
educational scene; and the services 
of these individuals constantly tend 
to improve elementary education. 
To Misses Tripp, Haigwood, and. 
Mitchell a grateful bow for work 
well done! 



Searing Featured By Paper 
As 'Tar Heel of the Week' 

0. Lee Searing, supervisor of 
School Food Services for the State 
Department of Public Instruction, 
was featured by the Raleigh News 
and Observer on March 7 as the 
"Tar Heel of the Week." 

The article traces his career 
from his native town of St. John's, 
Mich, through Michigan State 
where he majored in home econom- 
ics with the idea of becoming a 
restaurant owner, into his work 
with a cafeteria chain in Florida, 
and his M. S. degree in adminis- 
tration and supervision at Florida 
State. He is quoted as saying he 
became assistant supervisor of 
School Food Services for the Flor- 
ida schools — a post he held for 
seven years — because he found he 
could be "concerned with nutrition, 
not just making money." 

Searing came with the North 
Carolina Department as assistant 
supervisor of School Food Services 
in 1962 and he was named super- 
visor in 1964. 



Grant For Teachers Of 
Retarded Given to ECC 

East Carolina College has been 
awarded a Federal grant of $18,000 
to train teachers of mentally re- 
tarded children next year. 

Dean Douglas R. Jones of the 
ECC School of Education said the 
grant will enable the college to 
give five of its most promising 
seniors next year a concentrated 
course in method and technique 
for teaching the mentally retarded. 
The program will be under the 
direction of Dr. Gilbert G. Rag- 
land, ECC's special education co- 
ordinator. 



Fayetteville Junior Seeks 
National Homemaker Office 

North Carolina has a candidate 
for office in the National Future 
Homemakers of America, an or- 
ganization of home economics stu- 
dents in junior and senior high 
schools throughout the United 
States, the District of Columbia, 
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Is- 
lands. It is comprised of 11,000 
chapters and around 600,000 mem- 
bers. 

Vonna Viglione, a junior at 
Seventy-First High School in Fay- 
etteville, has been selected as a 
national candidate for the office of 
vice president of the Southern Re- 
gion. If elected, she would be one 
of 15 youth officers making up the 
National Executive Council of the 
organization, it was explained by 
Mrs. Hazel G. Tripp of the Home 
Economics Section of the State 
Department of Public Instruction. 
Mrs. Tripp is state advisor for the 
North Carolina Association of Fu- 
ture Homemakers of America. 

Miss Viglione was named South- 
ern Region candidate, from a slate 
of six nominees, by a special com- 
mittee following an interview in 
Raleigh on January 8. The six 
nominees had been selected by the 
North Cai*olina FHA membership 
at district meetings held through- 
out the State. 

In St. Louis 

The organization's election will 
be held during the 21st annual 
national FHA convention July 13- 
16 at the Chase-Park Plaza Hotel 
in St. Louis, Mo. when eight State 
officers, eight district advisors, and 
37 delegates from North Carolina 
will be in attendance. The organi- 
zation provides opportunities for 
developing individual and group 
initiative in planning and carrying 
out activities related to the home. 

Miss Viglione was to be installed 
as the State Future Homemakers 
of America reporter this spring 
and has resigned that post to run 
for the national office in St. Louis. 
Miss Virginia Autry of Stedman 
High School will assume the office 
of State reporter as she was the 
first alternate in the State elections. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



11 



Two Professionals Join Education Agency Staff 



Miss June Gilliard, who has been 
teaching language arts, social 
studies, and math at the North 
Carolina School of the Arts in 
Winston-Salem, has joined the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction as an education super- 
visor in social studies for the 
Division of Instructional Services. 
New Position 

Her position is a new one created 
through the expansion of the Na- 
tional Defense Education Act, 
which added social studies to the 
subject areas it helps support. This 
gives the Department two special- 
ists in social studies, the other one 
being John Ellington. 

Miss Gilliard, a native of Dur- 
ham, received an A.B. degree in 
social studies at Howard Univer- 
sity in Washington, D. C. and a 
M.S. degree from the University 
of Wisconsin at Madison. For 11 
months she was a John Hay Fellow 
at the John Hay Foundation in 
New York City. She taught for 
nine years in the Charlotte-Meck- 
lenburg school system. 



Change Noted in Adult 
Education Enrollment 

The adult education picture in 
North Carolina is an entirely dif- 
ferent one than that found on a 
nationwide basis in a survey con- 
ducted only four years ago by the 
National Opinion Research Center. 

The 1961-62 survey concluded 
that "the most critical challenge 
confronting adult education is the 
paradox that those who most need 
it don't want it, or at least they 
don't take it." At that time, it was 
found, adult education was "pri- 
marily for the young adult from 
the middle or upper-middle class," 
drawing few participants from the 
lower income brackets. In 1962 the 
most likely participant in adult 
education had been to college and 
was employed in a white collar 
job paying $7,000 a year or more. 

"That isn't true today," says Dr. 
Monroe Neff who is in charge of 
General Adult Education Pro- 
grams for the State's Department 
of Community Colleges. "Nobody 
can say the undereducated do not 



Vocational Education 

William C. Blackmore on March 
1 became assistant State supervisor 
of Diversified and Comprehensive 
Vocational Education. He replaces 
Tommie N. Stephens who became 
State supervisor of this phase of 
the Division of Vocational Educa- 
tion's program last January. 

For the past 18 years Blackmore 
has been teaching in the Pender 
County schools at Burgaw. For 
seven years he served as county 
supervisor for Farmers Home 
Administration, stationed in Ral- 
eigh, and prior to that he was a 
teacher in the Scotland County 
schools at Laurinburg. He received 
his B.S. degree in agriculture 
education from N. C. State Univer- 
sity at Raleigh and has taken 
graduate work at that institution 
and at East Carolina College in 
Greenville. 

want an education," he declared. 
"Before, the basic courses they 
needed just weren't available." 

Last year, nearly half of all 
adults enrolled in adult education 
in the State had incomes below 
$5,000. The majority had incomes 
below $3,000. This year, 26,000 of 
the 47,000 adults enrolled in the 
program are from the lower in- 
come bracket. 

Dr. Neff has no data on the in- 
come brackets of the adults taking 
courses other than those enrolled 
in the basic education program. 
However, enrollments in the State's 
adult education programs in 1964- 
65, other than basic education 
courses, show that nearly half of 
the participating adults were get- 
ting their high school diplomas. 

Of the remaining adults in the 
program — those who were neither 
in basic education nor in the high 
school programs — the emphasis 
was on the practical rather than 
the academic. The majority took 
courses in business education, with 
bookkeeping, shorthand, typing, 
and accounting the most popular 
subjects. Consumer education was 
the second most popular field of 
study; language arts (especially 
rapid reading classes) were third, 
and homemaking classes were 
fourth. 



Modern Language Forum 
Holds Spring Meeting 

Members of the North Carolina 
Modern Language Forum — repre- 
sentative teachers, professors, and 
State Department personnel — held 
its spring meeting in Raleigh, 
March 31, to continue discussions 
begun last December. The chief 
purpose of the forum is to discuss 
and find means of providing maxi- 
mum coordination between ele- 
mentary and secondary schools, the 
colleges and universities, and be- 
tween all schools and colleges and 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

Topics explored in further detail 
at the March meeting, according 
to Mrs. Tora Ladu, supervisor of 
foreign languages, included cur- 
riculum articulation and teacher 
training. "One of the chief fea- 
tures of the forum," stated Mrs. 
Ladu, "is the emphasis on sharing 
what its members have learned 
from their respective cohorts 
which seems to have possibilities 
for improving the preparation of 
foreign language teachers and the 
classroom teaching of foreign lan- 
guages." 

Dr. Roy Prince, head of the for- 
eign language department, Appala- 
chian State Teachers College, and 
Dr. Jacques Hardre, chairman of 
the Romance Language Depart- 
ment, UNC-CH, served as co- 
chairmen of the forum. Serving as 
consultants were staff members in 
the Modern Foreign Languages 
Section of the State Department: 
Mrs. Ladu, Virgil Miller, and Mrs. 
Lee Sparkman. 



LeMay Is Institute Prexy 

Col. Robert L. LeMay has been 
named president of W. W. Holding 
Technical Institute. He had served 
as acting president since Septem- 
ber 23. 1965. 

He is a retired Army officer, 
graduated from the University of 
Cincinnati with a degree in edu- 
cation, and received the Master of 
Arts and Master of Business Ad- 
ministration degrees from Syra- 
cuse University. He is a native of 
Memphis, Tenn. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Iran Teacher Finds His Concepts of American 
Life and Education Changed After Visit Here 



Mohammad Ali Shamshir Saz, a 
teacher in the Agriculture Voca- 
tional Center at Kharassan, Iran, 
and one of 10 foreign teachers in 
this State through the U. S. Office 
of Education's International Teach- 
er Development Program, says his 
six-month stay in America has re- 
sulted in changes in previously held 
concepts of American education 
and life. 

He has been observing in the 
Bladen County schools and said this 
community assignment was one of 
the "strong points of my personal 
program." He has found Americans 
to be "very friendly and helpful 
whether I was in a large city or a 
small community." Americans are 
informal and gentle people, he said. 
He also finds them dutiful. "Wheth- 
er or not they are under any con- 
trol, they do their best to do a good 
job," he added. 

Social Concern 

"Provision for special care for 
mentally retarded, juvenile offend- 
ers, and old people is a desirable 
interest of the people of this coun- 
try," he said. "I have observed rest 
homes and heard about boys' 
homes. Also, I have visited mental- 
ly retarded classes in this country. 
I have found most Americans very 
skillful in the job for which they 
have been prepared. I believe this 
important characteristic is due to 
the guidance and counseling ser- 
vice you have in your schools." 
Previous Concepts 

In speaking of changes in his 
previous concepts of American life, 
he made these comments — 

"This country gives much free- 
dom to the people. I was aware of 
that, however, I thought there might 
exist a disobedience in the schools 
and organizations. Upon observing 
the government offices, taking 
courses in the university, and visit- 
ing the schools, I found that, on 
the contrary, there exists an obedi- 
ence. I was particularly impressed 
by the obedience of the people to 
the law. 

"In my previous concepts of 
American life I thought that reli- 
gion did not play any role. But 
visiting the churches and so many 
religious institutions has proved to 



me that Americans are mostly 
pious and that religion plays an 
important role in the country. The 
government of the United States is 
secular, but I believe churches in- 
fluence the lives of the Americans. 
Racial Problem 

"The story of Negroes and es- 
pecially the racial problem in the 
United States is discussed among 
the educated people in my own 
country. In my previous concepts I 
believed there might not exist a 
prosperous condition in which 
colored people could enjoy equality 
and freedom the same as whites. 
Visiting many institutions and 
schools and observing some differ- 
ent cases has proved to me that 
every person, regardless of color or 
religion, can enjoy equality and 
freedom in this country. It depends 
on the individual as to how he uses 
the facilities at his command. 

"The most important reason for 
the progress of this country, to me, 
was wealth. Spending time with 
the people and studying the society 
of the United States has proved to 
me that there is a large middle 
class with a good fundamental edu- 
cation. Wise leadership of the 
country could be the most impor- 
tant reason for the advancement of 
the country." 



System Merger, School Bonds 
Defeated in Richmond Vote 

Voters in Richmond County on 
February 26 turned down a $3 mil- 
lion bond issue for school improve- 
ments and a proposed merger of 
the county's three school systems. 
Both issues would have had to be 
approved for either to become ef- 
fective. 

The bond issue failed by 12 
votes— 2,723 to 2,711. The proposal 
to consolidate the Rockingham, 
Hamlet, and Richmond County 
school system lost by 18 votes — 
2,695 to 2,677. 

The county commissioners as 
well as the Hamlet city and the 
Richmond County school systems 
had endorsed the proposals. Rock- 
ingham city school officials origin- 



Outward Bound School 
Planned For State 

By the spring of 1967 North 
Carolina is expected to have an 
Outward Bound School designed to 
teach self-reliance to boys and 
girls aged 16 through 23 years in 
order to better prepare them to 
become leaders in adult life. 

Articles of incorporation were 
filed in Durham in late January 
and in late February Watts Hill, 
Jr. of that city was named acting 
chairman of a board of directors. 
The board ratified a charter, adopt- 
ed bylaws, and is now attempting 
to raise $275,000 from North Car- 
olina industry to pay for a physical 
plant for the school. A slate of offi- 
cers was expected to be elected at 
the next board meeting, tentatively 
scheduled for early April. 
In Mountains 

Present plans are to locate the 
school in the Linville Gorge-Blow- 
ing Rock area. It will offer a 26-day 
course of extremely difficult physi- 
cal exploits in order to train minds 
and bodies and result in improved 
self confidence and abilities. The 
school will be the fourth of its 
kind in the United States. There 
are only 19 others throughout the 
world. 

The program is expected to re- 
semble that of other outward bound 
schools. Teenagers are taught to 
scale preciptious mountain cliffs, 
hack their way through forests, 
and swim in chilly mountain water. 
They are instructed how to find 
food, to kill game with only the 
barest essentials, and taught moun- 
tain rescue. 

Half of the students will be on 
scholarships and the other half will 
pay a tuition of about $300. Thus 
the students will have opportunity 
to mix with individuals of their 
own age from different economic 
and cultural backgrounds. 



ally endorsed the proposals but 
later voiced opposition to both 
issues. If the proposals had car- 
ried, two new consolidated high 
schools were to be built in the 
county — one to serve the Rocking- 
ham-Ellerbe area and the other 
the Hamlet-East Rockingham area. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



13 






Hunt Outlines Challenges For Public Schools 
In Umsfead Lectures on Child Mental Health 



Participating in the third an- 
nual John W. Umstead series of 
Distinguished Lectures, Nile F. 
Hunt, director of the Division of 
Instructional Services for the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, outlined challenges for 
the schools in North Carolina "as 
we collectively look toward the 
future with respect to child mental 
health." 

The lectures were sponsored by 
the North Carolina Department 
of Mental Health, the North Caro- 
lina Mental Health Association, 
and the North Carolina State 
Medical Society. They were held 
in February on the campus of 
N. C. State University. 

Foremost Challenge 

Hunt said the foremost chal- 
lenge is that of helping teachers 
become aware of the mental health 
implications of school and class- 
room and equipping them to deal 
effectively with them. The position 
of teacher must be open only to 
those who see the school existing 
for the child, rather than a means 
of economic support, he added. 
"Relevant phases of the biological 
sciences, the social sciences, the 
medical sciences, and the psycho- 
logical sciences must be brought 
together in a meaningful body of 
content useful to teachers," Hunt 
said. "A synthesis of this know- 
ledge must be translated into 
usable terms and made an integral 
part of pre-service and in-service 
education of teachers." 

Pointing out that the educative 
process is not a "leveling down" 
process but a place for and pro- 
cess of nurturing talent of all 
types and degrees, he urged con- 
certed effort toward continuing 
respect for and enhancement of 
the "uniqueness of the individual." 
"A school embracing such a com- 
mitment must provide differential 
curricula; must employ differ- 
entiated materials, media, and 
methodologies; and must recognize 
differentiated levels of expect- 
ation," he declared. 

A further challenge he listed as 
that of discovering the potential 
of cooperative, interagency effort. 



Hunt pointed out that the var- 
ious agencies and discipline con- 
cerned with child mental health 
are in agreement that behavior is 
not accidental, that it is the 
resultant of forces operating from 
within and from without the 
individual and from relationships 
with others. They are agreed that 
human behavior is caused and, 
therefore, influenceable; the 
causes are multiple and they are 
interrelated. "Notwithstanding all 
of these areas of agreement, our 
children by and large have been 
ministered unto by a rather vast 
array of independent specialists 
who, with rare exceptions, do not 
communicate one with another." 

Laborers from the several dis- 
ciplines involved can reinforce 
and backstop each other — they 
can learn from each other, he 
said. "A logical point of departure 
might be that of erecting lines of 
communication and establishing a 
common language. For example, 
the omnibus connotation that 
attends the term 'mental health' 
might be clarified. 

New Dimensions 

In view of the extent to which 
this nation has achieved the dream 
of universal education, the task 
of the school has grown larger 
and become more difficult, Hunt 
stated. "Many children and youth 
are now in school who in former 
years would have been permitted 
to remain absent or would have 
been 'squeezed' out directly or 
indirectly." As educators consider 
matters relating to the education 
of the culturally, economically, 
and educationally deprived child, 
the personality-environment strug- 
gle takes on new dimensions. 

The school is basically middle 
class oriented — 95 percent of the 
teachers are middle class; cur- 
riculum and commonly used meas- 
uring instruments are of middle 
class design; goals, the seedbed 
for motivation, are in terms of 
middle class values; the vehicles 
of teaching and learning are of 
middle class tailoring, Hunt 
declared. 



A Dilemma 

"As a result of this, we have a 
dilemma in education: almost 
complete failure of the school to 
recognize a lower class culture 
with certain values and advan- 
tages and a definite mold for 
socialization of the young," he 
said. "The public school's first 
order of business is to seek to 
understand 'other culture' values, 
processes, and circumstances, and 
to redesign curricula, programs, 
and services to use these advan- 
tages in educating children, rather 
than using them as excuses to 
make children over to fit our own 
concepts and ways of doing." 
Common Needs 

He listed four areas of need 
common to all children and youth 
and which have relevance to teach- 
ing and learning — 

• Need for function. Schools, 
as a rule, do not understand 
organic development and function- 
ing to the extent they understand 
verbalism. The traditionally verbal 
curricula have not taken into 
account this energy expending 
need as an integral part of the 
educative process. 

• Need for security, defined as 
"feeling at home in the world." 
For the insecure child reading, 
writing, and arithmetic fade into 
insignificance and constructive 
change or corrective action can- 
not be left to chance. 

• Need for a sense of adequacy. 
Every pupil in school should be 
placed in a position commensurate 
with his maturity and experience 
to the end that some measure of 
progress and accomplishment may 
be sensed. 

• Need for belonging. A sense 
of belonging comes from experi- 
ences in roles that are recognized 
and respected by the peer group. 
"If the teaching-learning process 
is to be effective, the teacher must 
be in a position to recognize the 
need for participant belonging as 
a reality and as a force which 
bears directly upon classroom 
activities, upon the learning which 
does or does not occur, and upon 
the mental health of individual 
pupils." 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Three Principals Named 

Three new superintendents have 
been approved by the State Board 
of Education following their elect- 
ion by local boards of education. 
Pinehurst City 

Fred G. Lewis, a native of Beau- 
ford County, has been named 
superintendent of the Pinehurst 
City schools to succeed the late 
Lewis S. Cannon. He assumed his 
new duties on February 21. 

Lewis attended the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
received his A.B. degree in English 
from Atlantic Christian College in 
Wilson, earned his M.A. degree in 
special education at East Carolina 
College in Greenville, and has com- 
pleted five graduate courses at ECC. 
He goes to Pinehurst from Aurora 
High School in Beaufort County 
where he was principal. 

He has held teaching and super- 
visory positions in Saint Paul's 
Private School, Beaufort High 
School, Brinson Memorial School, 
Morehead City High School, Camp 
Glen School, and Carteret County 
schools. 

Avery County 

Harry McGee became superin- 



to Superintendent Posts 

tendent of the Avery County School 
system on April 1, replacing Ken- 
neth Anderson who resigned as of 
that date. McGee had been serving 
as principal of Cranberry High 
School. 

He received both his B.S. and 
M.A. degrees from Appalachian 
State Teachers College, the first in 
1953 and the second in 1957. His 
entire teaching career has been 
spent in the Avery County school 
system and he had been a principal 
since the beginning of the 1960-61 
school year. 

Fremont City 

William Darron Flowers is the 
new superintendent of the Fremont 
City system in Wayne County, re- 
placing Leland V. Godwin who re- 
signed. He had been serving as 
principal of North Edgecombe 
School which is comprised of grades 
one through 12. 

Flowers received both his B.S. 
and M.A. degrees from Eastern 
Carolina College in Greenville, the 
first in 1956 and the latter in 1958. 
He has taught in Lenoir and Edge- 
combe counties and has been a 
principal since the beginning of 
the 1959-60 school year. 



Carnage Junior High 
Dedicated at Raleigh 

The new Carnage Junior High 
School in Raleigh was dedicated 
on Sunday afternoon, March 6, 
with Dr. John Hope Franklin, 
professor of American history at 
the University of Chicago, as prin- 
cipal speaker. 

Dr. Franklin is an authority on 
Negro history and affairs; is the 
author of several books in that 
field ; and has taught at Howard 
University, Fisk University, St. 
Augustine's College, and North 
Carolina College. 

A highlight of the dedication 
was the presentation of a portrait 
of the school's namesake, Fred J. 
Carnage, a member of the Raleigh 
Board of Education. The portrait 
was unveiled by his daughter, Miss 
Lillian Carnage. 

The school opened last Septem- 
ber. It has since added 10 teachers 
to the faculty and is adding 12 new 
classrooms. 



Watauga School Dedicated 

First planned for January 16 but 
"snowed out," the dedication of 
the new Watauga High School at 
Boone was held February 20 with 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
as speaker. 

The school, with facilities to 
accommodate 1,600 students, open- 
ed last fall with an enrollment of 
1,200. Cost of the structure, less 
fees, furniture, and equipment, 
was $1,581,829.50. 

"If I were expressing any one 
thought with regard to the manner 
in which we are to spend the tens 
of millions of dollars now available 
for schoolhouse construction in 
North Carolina as the result of the 
Statewide Referendum, I would 
emphasize the desirability and 
need to engage in the type of plan- 
ning that preceded the construc- 
tion of this facility that is being 
dedicated here today," Dr. Carroll 
told those attending the dedication 
ceremony. 



Educational Secretaries 
Hold Meeting at Durham 

Over 200 attended the Depart- 
ment of Educational Secretaries, 
NCEA, meeting in Durham March 
10-12. These women who are re- 
sponsible for school office efficiency 
seemed to enjoy most the annual 
banquet — when their bosses (visit- 
ing principals and superintendents 
from throughout the State) ex- 
pressed appreciation to them in 
song for struggling with such 
things as NDEA and ESEA rec- 
ords. 

Banquet speaker was the Rev. 
Albert G. Edwards of Raleigh who 
talked on the six elements of ma- 
turity — courtesy, charity, wisdom, 
integrity, sincerity, and honesty. 
Other speakers during the conven- 
tion included Mrs. Lillian Hirt, of 
Western Carolina College, whose 
subject was public speaking; Mrs. 
Nell Merdlein and Mrs. Clara 
Davis, of Concord, who discussed 
personal grooming "from head to 
toe;" and Tom Parker, of Drexel 
Enterprises, who spoke on public 
relations. 

In business sessions the dele- 
gates adopted a revised constitu- 
tion ; accepted a policies and pro- 
cedures handbook for State offi- 
cers; voted to return to Durham 
next March for the 1967 conven- 
tion ; and elected a new slate of 
officers who were installed by W. W. 
Hartsell, superintendent of the 
Concord schools. A Past President's 
Club was formed with Miss Pauline 
Helms of Albemarle, the depart- 
ment's first State president, named 
to head the group. On Friday after- 
noon the delegates visited the State 
Department of Public Instruction 
in Raleigh. 

Mrs. Mary Iris Isenhour of the 
Concord school system was re- 
elected State president. She pre- 
sided at the meetings. Other offi- 
cers for the 1966-67 year are Mrs. 
Grey Griffin, Williamston, first vice 
president; Harold Hewitt, Hickory, 
second vice president; Mrs. Betty 
Cooper, Asheville, recording secre- 
tary; Mrs. Corallie M. Hillman, 
Concord, corresponding secretary ; 
and Mrs. Gaynelle Brown, Central 
Piedmont Community College, 
Charlotte, treasurer. 



APRIL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



15 






LOOKING BACK 

In April issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 

Annual public- and private ex- 
penditures for education in 1970 
must be approximately $40 billion 
— double the 1960 figure, accord- 
ing to the President's Commission 
on National Goals. 



Ten Years Ago, 1956 
A system of public community 
colleges in strategic locations over 
the State was recommended re- 
cently by D. S. Coltrane, Assist- 
ant Director of the Budget. 

A minimum starting salary of 
$3,500 a year for all state teachers 
with Bachelor degrees is being 
asked by New York State's Heald 
Commission. 



Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 
A total of 55 million meals will 
be served in schools operated this 
year under the State's School 
Lunch Program, it was estimated 
by Mrs. Anne W. Maley, State 
Supervisor. 



Twenty Years Ago, 1946 
"The fuel situation is so un- 
certain we are very anxious to 
have your requisition as quickly 
as possible," urges C. W. Blanch- 
ard of the Controller's Office, 
State Board of Education, in a 
recent letter to all superintend- 
ents. 

Lloyd King, executive secretary 
of the American Textbook Publish- 
ers Institute, says that the diffi- 
culty with respect to paper for 
texts is greater than it was during 
the war. 



Twenty-five Years Ago, 1941 
Two hundred and thirty-five 

high schools participated on 
March 28 in the 29th annual tri- 
angular debating contest of the 
North Carolina High School De- 
bating Union. 

The General Assembly of 1941 
passed an act providing "for the 
extension of the public school 
system to embrace twelve grades 
in those school districts request- 
ing same." 



Dr. Ready Featured 
By NCEA Magazine 

The February issue of North 
Carolina Education, professional 
journal of the North Carolina Ed- 
ucation Association, paid tribute 
to the State Board of Education's 
Department of Community Col- 
leges and the educator who has 
directed the program since it was 
created by the 1963 General As- 
sembly, Dr. I. E. Ready. 

Dr. Ready is pictured on the 
cover of the magazine, standing in 
front of the Governor Charles B. 
Aycock monument in Raleigh. The 
cover story in the journal reviews 
the tremendous growth in the com- 
prehensive community college pro- 
gram. 

"The aim of the community col- 
leges and technical institutes has 
been simply provide low cost train- 
ing and instruction on a commuter 
basis," the story says. "But while 
the aim has been to keep the cost 
down for the student, the aim has 
also been to keep quality high." 

Of the program's director, the 
magazine says "he comes natural- 
ly to the job. His career has 
spanned all levels of public educa- 
tion"- — coach and teacher of Eng- 
lish, assistant principal, principal, 
superintendent, and director of the 
Curriculum Study Commission of 
the State Board of Education. 

"With the already demonstrated 
dedication and ability of Dr. Ready 
and his staff, the Comprehensive 
Community College system can be 
expected to continue to broaden 
educational opportunity for North 
Carolina as it progresses under 
its philosophy, 'Come one, come 
all — we have something for you,' " 
the article concludes. 



Good Hiking Companion 

For any school groups planning 
field trips or nature hikes this 
spring, the North Carolina De- 
partment of Agriculture recom- 
mends a companion — a new publi- 
cation prepared by Harry T. Davis 
of the North Carolina State Mu- 
seum in Raleigh. 

The well-illustrated booklet is 
entitled "Poisonous Snakes of the 
Eastern United States" and in- 
cludes a first aid guide. 



IN MEMORIAM 

When the State Board of 
Education adjourned i t s 
March 4 meeting at the Edu- 
cation Building in Raleigh it 
did so in honor and in mem- 
ory of the late D. Hiden 
Ramsey of Asheville. 

Mr. Ramsey served as a 
member of the Board from 
April 1, 1945 through March 
31, 1953 and was vice chair- 
man during the last five 
years of his term. He also 
served as a member of the 
Board of Higher Education, 
having been that body's first 
chairman. 



Space Agency Urges Caution 
In Amateur Rocket Firings 

Amateur rocketeers setting off 
unauthorized firings can be a haz- 
ard to aircraft, the Federal Avia- 
tion Agency warns. 

In a recent request for caution, 
received by the State Department 
of Public Instruction, it was point- 
ed out that most amateur rocket- 
eers are of high school age — 
intelligent students with a scien- 
tific bent. Some have built rockets 
capable of speeds in excess of 500 
miles per hour and able to reach 
altitudes above 15,000 feet. 

Information from other states 
indicates that injuries and at least 
one death have resulted from 
rocket firings by high school stu- 
dents. The military services and 
the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration encourage 
and render assistance to these 
rocketeers. They urge that science 
teachers, science club advisors, 
and others who may be interested 
in aerospace science use all pre- 
cautions possible to see that such 
firings are carried out in safety — 
to those participating in the actual 
firings, to others within firing 
range, and to any aircraft that 
may be in the vicinity. 

Regulations governing such fir- 
ings are carried in Part 101 of a 
Federal Aviation Agency publica- 
tion entitled "Federal Aviation 
Regulations." 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



7 



b 



3om 



Iducationai. 
Iress 
soc i atioin 
or 

, M F. R I C A 




North Carolina State Library- 
Raleigh 

NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 



a 



• ^ 



*Oc 



MAY 1966 



RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



VOL. XXX, NO. 9 




Pearsall Plan Voided; 
Attendance Law Intact 

A three-judge Federal court 
panel on April 4 declared North 
Carolina's Pearsall Plan unconsti- 
tutional. 

There was little surprise among 
educators at the decision, most of 
them pointing out that this unused 
law, which had been on the books 
for 10 years, had served its pur- 
pose — a shock absorber or escape 
valve against pressures developing 
among critics of the 1954 Supreme 
Court's school desegregation rul- 
ing. 

In striking down the Pearsall 
Plan, the Federal jurists also de- 
clared North Carolina's compul- 
sory attendance law "null and void" 
in that this section of the State's 
public school laws was included in 
the portion declared unconstitu- 
tional. Pointing out that inclusion 
of the attendance law in the ruling 
must have been "inadvertedly" 
done, Superintendent of Public In- 
struction Charles F. Carroll asked 
the Attorney General's office to 
clarify the matter with the Federal 
judges. On April 22 a modified 
ruling was issued, leaving the at- 
tendance law intact. 

State Treasurer Edwin Gill said 
no funds were ever expended under 
the now defunct Pearsall Plan. 

The State Board on December 2, 
1965, after receipt of a ruling from 
the Attorney General's office, ap- 
proved payment of the State's first 
tuition grant under the Pearsall 
Plan. The Board authorized the 
$256 grant be paid, through the 
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of 
Education, to Lewis Wilson Mc- 
Clain of Mecklenburg County for 
his ward, Terrance H. McClain, to 
attend Carolina Military Academy 
in Maxton. A week following the 
approval, three Negro families files 
the Federal suit challenging tie 
law and were successful in obtsin- 
ing a temporary order restraining 
payment of the grant. 



tion." 



Tar Heels and USOE Discuss Guidelines; 
Units Advised to Sign Compliance Form 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction Charles F. Carroll on April 
15 recommended that school systems in North Carolina proceed with 
executing the controversial Form 441-B relating to compliance with new 
Federal guidelines for implementing Title VI of the Civil Rights Act 
of 1964. 

The recommendation was made after assurances from the U. S. Office 
of Education, given to Dr. Carroll and a large delegation of Tar Heels 
at a meeting in Washington on April 14, that Form 441-B might be re- 
called or cancelled by any local board of education should any future 
amendment to the guidelines not be acceptable by that board. 

Dr. Carroll, in forwarding his recommendation to city and county 
superintendents, said also that it might be appropriate for any board of 
education having reservations about executing the form "to attach to 
the form as an addendum, a statement of condition or reservation." He 
pointed out that a future recall or cancellation of Form 441-B by a 
board of education would presumably mean that the board would be 
called upon "to negotiate a new agreement with the U. S. Office of Educa- 

Free Choice 
The form does not apply to 
boards of education currently op- 
erating under a Federal court or- 
der or under an approved Form 
441 declaration. It does apply to 
all "freedom of choice" plans un- 
der which 155 of the State's 169 
school systems are operating. The 
USOE extended the deadline for 
filing the form from the original 
date of April 15 to May 6. 

The Office of the Attorney Gen- 
eral of North Carolina had pre- 
viously ruled that the guidelines, 
in effect, "are the law" and ad- 
vised that local school boards pro- 
ceed with signing the form, which 
constitutes a pledge to abide by 
the revised Federal guidelines and 
any amendments made to them by 
the U. S. Commissioner of Edu- 
cation. "If any question is raised 
as to their validity, the proper 
forum for such action is the 
Court," the Attorney General's rul- 
ing stated. (See "The Attorney 
General Rules. . . ," page 15.) 

The April 14 meeting of Tar 
Heels with U. S. Commissioner of 
Education Harold Howe II and his 
staff was arranged after Gover- 
nor Moore and the State Board of 

(Continued on Page 5) 



Units Consider Title I 

The State Department of Public 
Instruction has called three meet- 
ings during May for the purpose of 
discussing the completion of appli- 
cation forms for Title I, ESEA, 
projects for the 1966-67 year. 

As Public School Bulletin went 
to press, meetings were being 
planned for May 11 at Lenoir 
Rhyne College in Hickory, May 
12 at East Carolina College in 
Greenvi'le, and May 17 in the 
Highway Building Auditorium at 
Raleigh. ESEA project directors 
for the various school systems, 
superintendents, and assistant su- 
perintendents were to attend. 

Tne Department had been noti- 
fied that this State may expect to 
receive next year around 85 per- 
cent of its maximum allocation 
curing the 1965-66 fiscal year end- 
ing June 30. May 2 was the final 
deadline for submitting applica- 
tions for ESEA project funds for 
the current fiscal year. By mid- 
April $43,718,885.63 had been allo- 
cated to 150 school units for 165 
projects and applications for proj- 
ect funds from 13 units were 
being studied. 



(Excerpts from greetings extended NCEA State convention in Raleigh, March 24, 1966) 

. . . Viewing the educational horizon in this and other states, I feel confident that 
the fulfillment of our convention theme, "Education Sufficient for Our Times," is the 
aspiration of all of us. As I sense the total situation, the pursuit of educational pro- 
grams sufficient for our times accounts for much of the current clamor, commotion, 
confusion, appropriation, and political design with which we in education and allied 
activities are confronted. If we had in this fair land the right kind of education in the 
proper places and in adequate amounts, the chances are good that most if not all of 
us could enjoy more of that peace of mind that stems from successful achievement. 

Neither time nor propriety permits me to review with you at any length tonight the 
major challenges that require your attention and my attention at this time. Neverthe- 
less, I do want to list a few of the many challenges without much comment. 

Certainly, the intelligent implementation of the several phases of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act with its emphasis upon pupil achievement and innova- 
tion, is one of the major challenges afforded our profession. 

Likewise, the implementation of the guidelines governing Title VI of the Civil Rights 
Act, designed to remove all vestiges of discrimination on account of race, color, or 
national origin; designed to accelerate pupil and staff integration; and designed to 
eliminate ineffective schools for minority groups, is a demanding challenge not only 
to our public schools but to the entire citizenry of our State. 

There is the challenge of recruiting, training, and absorbing into our total educa- 
tional structure the different types of personnel now made available to us. I refer 
to teacher aides, interns, social workers, nurses, psychologists, psychometrists, home- 
school coordinators, clinicians, and specialists. These are the types of people we have 
been requesting over the years as a means of increasing our effectiveness in the class- 
room. As an example, when we met a year ago there were 96 teacher aides in North 
Carolina schools. Tonight there are more than 6,000 persons in this position. The 
utilization of this vast resource of potential assistance is certainly one of the chal- 
lenges of the day. 

Another opportunity and growing need is the conversion of the school system into a 
12-months operation to accommodate early childhood education, kindergartens, special 
instruction for the low achiever, adult education, vocational and technical education, 
health and nutritional programs, enrichment courses for the so-called average and 
talented pupils, and year-round library services. Obviously such a conversion into a 12- 
months operation brings to the fore the necessity for educational personnel to be 
employed on an annual basis, thereby placing educational personnel in the position 
to be recognized as truly professional people instead of part-time employees. 

The challenges of the day likewise extend to our county and city boards of educa- 
tion. There is the necessity, as never before, for county and city boards of education 
to evaluate and to select those programs and educational opportunities which they 
consider to be of greatest value to their respective systems without the traditional 
regard for what their neighbors may be doing. There is equal necessity for county 
and city boards of education to reject those programs and activities that are of little 
or doubtful value to their administrative unit. 

In evaluating the many programs and services available it is incumbent upon boards 
of education, administrators, and teachers to recognize the fact that "everybody", at 
least figuratively, wants to help you, advise you, consult with you, and tell you how to 
run your business, and certainly it is incumbent upon you and your associates to 
know those who can help and those who can easily hinder you. It may not be remiss, 
and I speak reverently, to pray again that God may save us from some of our 
"friends"! 

These are some of the major challenges and opportunities begging of immediate 
solution. If these are not sufficient to keep you busy during this visit to Raleigh, I 
shall be glad to give you another list before you leave the City. 

Seriously, the order of the day and the order for tomorrow is the exercise of good 
judgment undergirded by keen and perceptive understanding, and supported by un- 
bounded energy, unflagging courage, and above all, a good sense of humor. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except June, July and August by the Stote Department o» 
Public Instruction, Education Building, Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class postage paid 
at Raleigh, N. C. 27402. 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



ORACLES AND OPINIONS 

It is not so much the fact of 
change in industry which startles 
our national imagination today as 
the rate of that change. ... It is 
clear that if we are to train today's 
students for a useful life tomorrow 
we must have some indication of 
what tomorrow will be like. Our 
vocational schools must have much 
better information, not only on job 
opportunities today, but on job re- 
quirements five, ten, and twenty 
years from now. — U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Education Harold Howe 
II. 



Factors such as maturity, moti- 
vation, diligence, study habits, 
"drive," and let's face it, the teach- 
er, play a part in what a child 
does with his potential. He may be 
gifted in music, art or mechanics 
and be a misfit in a reading circle. 
It's up to the classroom teacher to 
discover and do something. — Mrs. 
Virgie M. Mclntyre, N. C. Educa- 
tion. 



... If a curriculum is to be 
effective ... it must contain dif- 
ferent ways of presenting se- 
quences, different opportunities for 
some children to "skip" parts while 
others work their way through, 
different ways of putting things. 
A curriculum, in short, must con- 
tain many tracks leading to the 
same general goal. — -Jerome S. 
Bruner, Toward a Theory of In- 
struction. 



CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

Vol. XXX, No. 9 



MAY, 1966 



It is little strain on the teacher, 
whatever her own capacities, to 
drill a child in computation, to 
pound scientific facts or historical 
dates or grammatical rules into his 
head. But the new pedagogy insists 
that all these rote materials are of 
diminishing importance, and that 
what should be conveyed is a com- 
prehension of the process and the 
structure of each subject the child 
begins to meet. Inevitably, the 
teacher will be hard put to teach 
in this fashion when her own edu- 
cation was empty of the concepts 
tf process and structure. — Stephen 
White, Students, Scholars, and 
Patents. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



GkoolUuj, SufifiLmenta>i4f Mat&UaL Making Un Quad* 



Supplementary instructional ma- 
terials have potential value for all 
students, though their usefulness 
for slow learners and the academ- 
ically talented has most often been 
stressed. Supplementary books, in 
particular, are desirable as class- 
room aids for increasing and im- 
proving the learning opportunities 
of all students. Such books are in- 
tended to supply that which is not 
found in basal textbooks, and for 
this reason should duplicate as lit- 
tle as possible the content of State 
adoptions. In a very real sense, 
such books also supplement as well 
as complement those housed in the 
central library. 

Books of a supplementary nature 
are desirable in all areas, irrespec- 
tive of grouping procedures, size of 
classes, or teaching techniques most 
often employed. And, today, when 
increasing emphasis is being placed 
on independent study, the accessi- 
bility of supplementary materials 
of appropriate interest and achieve- 
ment levels and in adequate num- 
bers is more important than ever 
before. 

Types, quality, and quantity of 
supplementary materials depend on 
such significant factors as the fol- 
lowing: achievement levels of stu- 
dents, especially in the area of 
reading; student interests; antici- 
pated learning experiences; plan- 
ned flexibility in use of materials; 
the teacher's philosophy of teach- 
ing-learning experiences ; the teach- 
er's skill, ingenuity, imagination, 
and creativity; class size; class- 
room facilities; library holdings; 
and the availability of financial as- 
sistance. 

Equally important is the need 
for recognition of the importance 
of the team approach to selection of 
supplementary materials. All teach- 
ers, with administrative and super- 
visory assistance, should be respon- 
sible for developing a vital, 
functional philosophy relative to 
the procurement and use of such 
materials. In terms of the team ap- 
proach to effective selection, it 
should be stressed that cooperative 
planning which involves the librar- 
ian and all teachers, as well as 
students, is mandatory if the most 



appropriate supplementary mater- 
ials, especially books, are to be 
secured. 

Implementation of this philos- 
ophy should guarantee more intelli- 
gent acquistion of supplementary 
materials and wider and more ef- 
fective use of such materials by 
more and more students. In turn, 
learning experiences should become 
increasingly personalized and in- 
creasingly meaningful for all 
students. 

Supplying that which is lacking 
and that which is needed, in terms 
of individual student needs in in- 
dividual learning situations, should 
indeed be the basic philosophy un- 
derlying the procurement and the 
use of all supplementary materials ! 



'JeacJt&i jEaad 

Accepted changes in education- 
al purposes, subject-matter con- 
tent, teaching techniques, and 
evaluation demand that renewed 
attention be focused on certain 
philosophical and practical as- 
pects pertaining to teacher load. 

Although no particular formula 
for overall teacher load is without 
its limitations, and no specific 
class size is necessarily ideal, it 
has become increasingly clear in 
recent years that some of the old- 
er notions about teacher load, and 
especially about class size, are 
now without sound foundation. 

There is no magic in any par- 
ticular number; neither can there 
be magic in teaching if numbers 
are too large. Experimental ex- 
periences in teaching indicate 
that large numbers often can be 
taught more effectively, more ef- 
ficiently, and more economically 
than smaller numbers. Witness 
the general lecture, the use of 
certain audiovisual aids, and the 
like. 

Research has also indicated that 
small groups are frequently best 
for certain learning experiences; 
for example, those whose innate 
values derive from student inter- 
action. And, in recent years, the 
evidence has become increasingly 
clear that independent effort is 



With the ever-mounting and 
ubiquitous pressures on students to 
achieve high grades, it is refresh- 
ing to encounter now and then a 
candid public admission by an ac- 
knowledged authority that making 
the grade in school is not a guaran- 
tee of making the grade in later 
life, and vice versa. 

One such caveat about the signif- 
icance of grades was recently ex- 
pressed by Dr. Donald B. Hoyt, 
coordinator of research activities 
for the American College Testing 
Program, and reported in the 
Winter issue of Insight: 

"College grades have no more 
than a very modest correlation with 
adult success," he observed, citing 
the findings of a number of studies 
as support for his conclusion. 

Such observations do not, by 
themselves, constitute a case for 
abandonment of the grading sys- 
tem ; but the fact that biographies 
of many notable people reveal 
mediocre or irregular academic 
performance deserves more than 
passing thought. 

one of the chief means through 
which students learn. In a situa- 
tion heavily oriented in this direc- 
tion overall teacher load and class 
size in particular doubtless need 
rethinking. Additional evidence 
relative to tutoring will soon 
be available for analysis and 
thoughtful use. 

No matter what formulas seem 
best for allocating teachers at the 
State level, increasing attention, 
within the law, is consciously be- 
ing given to such factors as age, 
ability, and background of stu- 
dents; preparation, skill, and cre- 
ativity of teachers; teaching and 
testing techniques to be employed; 
instructional aids and facilities 
available; willingness to experi- 
ment with changes; and, most sig- 
nificant of all, the goals of edu- 
cation which hopefully will be 
attained. 

In view of what is currently ex- 
pected of students through their 
schools, overall teacher load, with 
particular emphasis on class size, 
should undergo careful study, 
debate, and possible revision 
wherever sound education is de- 
sired. 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Basal Textbooks Adopted by State Board 



The State Board of Education on 
April 7 adopted basal mathematics 
textbooks for elementary and high 
schools and co-basal texts at each 
of four levels in French and Span- 
ish. A new general shop text and 
a new North Carolina history basal 
text also were adopted. 

Math texts for elementary stu- 
dents are: Grade 1, Sets. Numbers. 
Numerals (Teacher's Edition only), 
published by Laidlaw Brothers at 
a retail price of $2.48; Grade 2, 
Sets. Numbers. Numerals, Laidlaw, 
$2.82 ; Grade 3, Arithmetic 3, Laid- 
law, $2.82; Grade 4, Arithmetic U, 
Laidlaw, $2.82; Grade 5, Arithme- 
tic 5, Laidlaw, $2.82; Grade 6, 
Arithmetic 6, Laidlaw, $2.82. 

Recognizing that there are pupils 
in grades 7 and 8 who need rein- 
forcement in mathematics skills as 
well as an expansion of fundamen- 
tal concepts, the Board adopted two 
basal textbooks for each of these 
grades. A memorandum with sug- 
gestions for determining distribu- 
tion has been mailed to all school 
units by the Department of Public 
Instruction's Division of Instruc- 
tional Services. 

Students scoring below grade 
level in either reading or mathe- 
matics or in both should use Basic 
Modern Mathematics, First Course 
(Grade 7), and Basic Modern 
Mathematics, Second Course 
(Grade 8), Addison-Wesley, $3.64. 
Students scoring above grade level 
should use Exploring Modern 
Mathematics, Book I (Grade 7), 
and Exploring Modern Mathema- 
tics, Book II (Grade 8), Holt, Rine- 
hart & Winston, $3.86. 

Dual Adoptions 

For Grade 9 a dual adoption was 
made in order to develop and re- 
inforce basic mathematics skills 
and concepts of students enrolled 
in fundamental mathematics. Stu- 
dents reading substantially below 
grade level should use Modern. 
General Mathematics, Addison- 
Wesley, $3.64. Students with a 
stronger foundation in reading 
should use Mathematics : A Modern 
Approach, Addison-Wesley, $3.64. 
From the mathematical point of 
view, content in the two books is 
essentially the same. 

The purpose of a dual adoption 
in algebra texts was to provide 



transitional materials for students 
who have a traditional mathemat- 
ics background and also to provide 
materials for students who have a 
background in contemporary math- 
ematics. 

For algebra students who have 
had a traditional mathematics pro- 
gram and who must make a transi- 
tion to a modern program, Modern 
Algebra, Books I and II, are sug- 
gested. Both are published by 
Houghton-Mifflin Co., Book I re- 
tailing at $4.83 and Book II retail- 
ing at $5.14. 

For algebra students who have 
a strong background in contem- 
porary mathematics, taught by 
teachers competent in contempor- 
ary mathematics. Modern Elemen- 
tary Algebra and Modern Interme- 
diate Algebra may be used. They 
are published by Holt, Rinehart, & 
Winston, the first retailing at $4.45 
and the latter at $4.80. 

Two other math texts are Geome- 
try, Addison-Wesley, $4.37, and 
Modern Trigonometry, Houghton- 
Mifflin Co., $5.00. 

Careful Deliberations 

Referring to the dual adoptions 
in the math field, Nile F. Hunt, 
director of the Division of Instruc- 
tional Services, said the relation- 
ship which exists between profi- 
ciency in reading and progress in 
mathematics cannot be overempha- 
sized. The selection of the appro- 
priate book to use should be based 
on the most valid data and infor- 
mation available and after "careful 
deliberations on the part of teach- 
ers, supervisors, and administra- 
tors," he said. 

Adopted for the seventh grade 
was North Carolina History, Geog- 
raphy, Government, Revised Edi- 
tion, Harcourt, Brace & World, 
$4.66. For seventh or eighth grade 
shop courses the Board adopted 
General Shop, Third Edition, Web- 
ster Division, McGraw-Hill, $5.00. 

French texts published by Holt, 
Rinehart & Winston are: Level 1, 
Ecouter et Parler, $3.76; Level 2, 
Barter et Lire, $5.35; Level 3, Lire, 
Parler et Ecrire, $6.21 ; Level 4, 
L'Heritage Francais, Revised Edi- 
tion, $4.49. Published by Harcourt, 
Brace & World are: A-L-M Level I, 
$2.76; A-L-M Level II, $3.28; 
A-L-M Level III, $4.49; and 
A-L-M Level IV, $5.18. 



West Named Associate 
Of Higher Ed. Board 

Dr. Cameron West, academic 
dean at Pfeiffer College since 1960, 
became associate director of the 
North Carolina Board of Higher 
Education on May 1. 

Dr. West fills the vacancy created 
when Dr. Howard R. Boozer be- 
came director of this board, which 
is responsible for planning and 
promoting North Carolina's system 
of higher education. He has been 
on the faculty at Pfeiffer College 
since 1956. 

He is a member of the Commit- 
tee on Administrative Affairs of 
the North Carolina Association of 
Colleges and Universities. In 1960- 
61 he served as consultant and 
executive secretary of the North 
Carolina Commission for the Study 
of Teacher Merit Pay Program. He 
is active in accreditation activities 
of State, regional, and national or- 
ganizations and has served as a 
member of the steering committee 
of the Statewide Cooperative Study 
on Teacher Education. He has 
served on the board of directors of 
the Southern Council of Teacher 
Education. 

Spanish texts by Holt, Rinehart 
& Winston: Level I, Entender y 
Hablar, $3.76; Level 2, Hablar y 
Leer, $5.35 ; Level 3, Leer, Hablar 
y Escribir, $6.21 ; and Level 4, 
Cumbres de la CivUizacion Espa- 
nola, Revised Edition, $5.00. By 
Harcourt, Brace & World: A-L-M 
Level I, $2.76; A-L-M Level II, 
$3.28; A-L-M Level III, $4.49; and 
A-L-M Level IV, $5.18. 

Hunt said school systems now 
using either of these series will no 
doubt wish to continue to do so. 
Others that choose one of the series 
will wish to examine both and se- 
lect the one that is best suited to 
their instructional program. 

Each series represents a com- 
plete language program consisting 
of texts, recorded tapes for class- 
room and for laboratory, and vis- 
uals. Teacher's editions are avail- 
able for each series. 

The recorded tapes are a "neces- 
sary" part of either series and they 
can be purchased with NDEA 
funds, it was pointed out. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Ten Schools Selected Library Demonstration 
Centers in State's ESEA Title II Program 



Ten Tar Heel schools have been 
selected for participation in a 
Demonstration School Library Pro- 
gram under Title II of the Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Education Act. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State 
Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion, said the schools will be eligi- 
ble to receive special supplemental 
allotments totaling $75,000 for the 
acquisition of a wide variety of 
library materials to enrich existing 
library resources. 

They will serve as demonstra- 
tion centers which school adminis- 
trators, teachers, librarians, school 
board members, parents, and civic 
leaders may visit to observe an ex- 
emplary school library program. It 
is anticipated that schools selected 
this year will serve as demonstra- 
tion centers for the school years 
1966-67 and 1967-68. 

An advisory committee composed 
of representatives of local school 
systems and members of college 
library science faculties assisted 
the staff of the Department of 
Public Instruction's Library and 
Instructional Materials Services in 
selecting the 10 schools from 55 
applications. Locations of the 
schools selected range from the 
small rural community to the large 
urban center. 

Independent Study 

Miss Cora Paul Bomar, who di- 
rects the Department's instruction- 
al media services and ESEA Title 
II programs, said emphasis is being 
placed on facilities and materials 
for independent study at the dem- 
onstration centers. New materials 
being introduced range from mi- 
crofilm for research work at the 
junior and senior high school level 
to 8 mm sound film as an instruc- 
tional media in the elementary 
grades. The latter is so simple to 
use, Miss Bomar said, a child in 
the lower primary level can load 
and operate the projectors. 

The schools selected to serve as 
demonstration centers are: Gentry 
School, Harnett County; Lawson- 
ville Avenue Elementary, Reids- 
ville; Carroll T. Overton Elemen- 
tary, Salisbury; Pink Hill Elemen- 
tary, Lenoir County; F. J. Carnage 
Junior High, Raleigh; Kiser Junior 



High, Greensboro; Lexington Mid- 
dle School, Lexington; Henderson- 
ville High School, Hendersonville ; 
Mooresville Senior High, Moores- 
ville; and North Moore High, 
Moore County. 



Tar Heels Discuss . . . 

(Continued from Page 1) 
Education had wired Health, Edu- 
cation, and Welfare Secretary 
John W. Gardner they considered 
the guidelines "impractical, irre- 
gular, and illegal." Howe wired 
Dr. Carroll that USOE contem- 
plated no changes in the guide- 
lines but felt a discussion of their 
interpretation and implementa- 
tion might prove beneficial. 
Delegation 

Accompanying Dr. Carroll to 
Washington were Assistant State 
Superintendent J. Everette Mil- 
ler; George Ragsdale, Governor 
Moore's legal assistant; Deputy 
Attorney General Ralph Moody 
and Andrew A. Vanore, Jr., also 
from the Attorney General's Of- 
fice; W. Dallas Herring, chairman 
of the State Board of Education; 
and representative school super- 
intendents from throughout the 
State. The attending superinten- 
dents were Harry M. Arndt, Ca- 
tawba County; John L. Dupree, 
Bertie County; W. P. Griffin, Ashe- 
ville; W. Henry Overman, Halifax 
County; A. Craig Phillips, Char- 
lotte-Mecklenburg; William H. 
Wagoner, New Hanover; Marvin 
Ward, Winston-Salem/Forsyth ; 
and George S. Willard, Jr., Wilson 
City. 

Joining the delegation in Wash- 
ington were several members of 
the Tar Heel U. S. congressional 
delegation. Because Congress was 
in the midst of a 10-day recess, a 
number of Congressmen and the 
State's two Senators, who found 
it impossible to be there in per- 
son, sent their administrative as- 
sistants. 

At the meeting Dr. Carroll read 
and filed with Commissioner Howe 
a statement which outlined in 
detail the basis of concern among 
North Carolinians with regard to 
the guidelines. Pointing out that 



Annual State PTA Meeting 

With attention focused on "The 
Real PTA — Responsible and Re- 
sponsive," more than 750 delegates 
participated in the 46th annual con- 
vention of the North Carolina 
Congress of Parents and Teachers 
which convened in Winston-Salem, 
May 3-5. 

Through addresses and symposi- 
ums those in attendance were 
challenged to meet their responsi- 
bilities with more intelligence and 
enthusiasm than ever before. 

Symposium topics included "Criti- 
cal Issues Facing the Community" 
and "Children's Emotional Health 
— A Responsible Community Re- 
sponds with Action." Mrs. Felix S. 
Barker of Raleigh, president of the 
North Carolina Congress, presided 
over the general sessions. 



"we have already been briefed on 
the guidelines at meetings in 
Hickory and Raleigh last month," 
he insisted that the meeting move 
directly into a discussion of those 
portions that seemed impractical. 
Percentages 

Commissioner Howe admitted 
his office has no legal authority to 
establish percentages regarding 
pupil and teacher desegregation. 
The percentages referred to in 
the guidelines, he said, are to 
serve as administrative guides to 
his office in determining progress 
toward desegregation and they are 
not to be interpreted as "fixed 
requirements." 

"We are not going to examine 
plans with any arbitrary numbers 
in mind," news reporters at the 
conference reported he said. "If 
there was an honest effort, some 
movement in desegregation, we 
are going to give the district an 
'A' for effort and say 'Let's do 
better next year.' " 

Commissioner Howe said that 
in appraising progress toward 
desegregation in the 1966-67 year, 
the USOE will primarily be con- 
cerned with three factors : ad- 
herence to procedures outlined in 
the guidelines for the implement- 
ation of the policies for school 
desegregation ; at least the begin- 
nings of faculty desegregation; 
and evidence of progress in 
eliminating a dual school system. 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



United Forces For Education Outlines 
Legislature Program of $130 Million 

The United Forces for Education 
at a press conference in Raleigh 
on March 21 revealed its 1967 
legislative program calling for ad- 
ditional expenditures for public 
schools of more than $130 million. 

T. Roy Phillips of Carthage, 
UFE chairman, called it a "go- 
forward program which will lift 
us from near the basement levels." 
He said the program could be 
financed without new or increased 
taxes if the same percentage of the 
General Fund that went to public 
schools 10 years ago is allotted to 
them in 1967-69. 

The money would provide — ■ 

• $90 to 95 million for teacher 
salary increases. 

• $1.35 million for extra pay 
for teachers supervising student 
teachers. 

• $11 million for reduction of 
class sizes by one pupil in grades 1 
through 12. 

• $1.8 million to extend employ- 
ment of all principals to a mini- 
mum of lO 1 /^ months, with 116 
union school principals and 77 
senior high principals to be em- 
ployed for 12 months. 

• $9 million to extend employ- 
ment of teachers by three days. 

• $450,000 to extend employ- 
ment of supervisors to 10 months. 

• $10 million for development 
of pilot kindergarten programs. 

• $11 million for improvement 
to the school transportation system. 

• $2.4 million for salary in- 
creases for people employed by 
schools in capacities "other than 
teaching." 

Concern Expressed 
UFE officials expressed concern 
over the continuing decrease in the 
percentage of the General Fund 
appropriation for the nine-month 
school fund, a 10 percent decrease 
in 10 years. It was emphasized 
that this decrease played an all- 
important part in the amount of 
money spent on each child in 
school. The State ranked 45th in 
the nation in per pupil expenditures 
in 1960. It climbed to 42nd place 
in 1961 when it spent only $124 
below the national average. 



A downward trend came in 1962 
and the State is now back to 43rd 
place and would have dropped 
lower had not $50 million in Fed- 
eral funds been allocated for stu- 
dent expenditures, UFE said. 

Lure Teachers Away 

It was stated that comparisons 
show that North Carolina teachers 
receive a lower average salary than 
the average for the Southeastern 
states. Two of the states, Virginia 
and Florida, are luring away many 
Tar Heel teachers, it was said. 

The UFE proposal is that sal- 
aries for teachers be increased 
during the next biennium from the 
current $4,234 to $6,440 range to 
a scale of $5,000 to $8,500 annually. 
The range would cover a broad 
span from new teachers in the 
Class A category to those in Class 
G category. 

Members of the UFE are the 
N. C. Congress of Parents and 
Teachers, the N. C. Congress of 
Colored Parents and Teachers, the 
N. C. Division of American Asso- 
ciation of University Women, the 
N. C. Federation of Women's 
Clubs, the N. C. Teacher Associa- 
tion, the N. C. Education Associa- 
tion, the N. C. State Grange, the 
N. C. State School Boards Associa- 
tion, and the N. C. Federation of 
Music Clubs. These groups are 
regularly surveyed for recommen- 
dations before UFE prepares budg- 
et suggestions to be forwarded to 
the General Assembly. 



Athletic Health Exams . . . 

School administrators and ath- 
letic directors throughout North 
Carolina — through the courtesy of 
Raymond Rhodes, director of school 
athletics and activities — are now 
in receipt of policy statements rela- 
tive to health examinations for 
athletic participation prepared by 
the National Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations 
and the Committee on the Medical 
Aspects of Sports of the American 
Medical Association. 



'White' Deleted From 
NCHSAA Constitution 

By March 31 a second vote to 
take the word "white" out of the 
constitution of the North Carolina 
High School Athletic Association 
had totaled in excess of the re- 
quired three-fourths majority. Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction 
Charles F. Carroll told the State 
Board of Education on April 7. 

This means that the door to 
membership in NCHSAA, largest 
of the State's three voluntary or- 
ganizations for the conducting of 
athletic programs in the public 
schools, is open to any public high 
school meeting qualifications — re- 
gardless of race of the attending 
students. The association has in- 
formed Dr. Carroll that three 
Negro schools which have applied 
for membership will be sent appli- 
cations in August in preparation 
for the annual acceptance of new 
members in November. 

In February the association's 
present membership voted 220 to 
108 for removing the word "white" 
from the constitution. However, 
since a three-fourths vote was 
needed to pass, the proposal was 
defeated by 26 votes. At the re- 
quest of Dr. Carroll, a second vote 
was conducted during March and 
the proposal passed. The State 
Superintendent pointed out that 
the State Board of Education has 
the authority to relieve the asso- 
ciation of its power to run inter- 
scholastic athletic programs. 

Between the two votes, lawyers 
for the National Association for 
Advancement of Colored People 
filed in Middle District Court an 
amendment to a 1963 complaint 
against the Concord City Board of 
Education, making the State Board 
of Education a defendant. The mo- 
tion asked the court to permanently 
enjoin the Concord board and the 
State Board from "sanctioning, 
authorizing and administering high 
school athletic programs or activi- 
ties on the basis of race. . . ." It 
also asked the court to prohibit 
the two boards from sanctioning 
and authorizing the administration 
of athletic programs by "individ- 
uals, agents or associations who 
discriminate." 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Adult Basic Education Classes for Prisoners 
Tie in With Developments in Rehabilitation 



Adult Basic Education classes, 
initiated and supervised by the De- 
partment of Community Colleges 
under provisions of Title II-B of 
the Educational Opportunity Act 
of 1964, are extending educational 
opportunities for thousands of in- 
mates in North Carolina's prisor 
system. 

Wilson Woodhouse, supervisor of 
Adult Basic Education in the De- 
partment of Community Colleges, 
explained how the ABE program 
is being tied in with existing 
educational and rehabilitation pro- 
grams of the State Prison De- 
partment. Woodhouse is a former 
member of the State Prison Com- 
mission. 

Last August, arrangements for 
setting up ABE classes in 37 
misdemeanant prison units were 
worked out between the Prison De- 
partment and the Department of 
Community Colleges. By March 
this year, some 600 misdemanant 
prisoners were participating in 
these classes on a voluntary basis. 

For several years basic educa- 
tion classes for felons have been 
conducted under Prison Depart- 
ment supervision, mostly with part- 
time instructors principally em- 
ployed as public school teachers. 
State law requires that felon in- 
mates below 35 years of age, whose 
achievement tests indicate perform- 
ance below the fourth grade level, 
attend such classes. 

Uniform Program 

Most recently, State Prison Di- 
rector V. L. Bounds has indicated 
that wherever possible, there 
should be an effort to provide 
classes for felons with less than 
an eighth-grade achievement level. 
With the aim of providing a uni- 
form basic education program 
throughout the prison system, it 
was decided to consolidate the two 
programs — adding the nearly 2,700 
felon inmates to the ABE program 
to be supervised by the Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges. 

This merger went into effect 
April 1, with the area institutions 
of the Community College system 
assuming responsibility for super- 
vision of prison classes in their 
respective areas. 



One of the principal advantages 
of the consolidation of basic edu- 
cation programs is that it affords 
a transitional link with community 
ABE programs, being operated 
through the area institutions, and 
with other educational programs of 
the Community College system, 
Woodhouse pointed out. 

Prison classes utilize the System 
for Success reading program, one 
of several basic systems being 
used in the community ABE classes 
throughout the State. When a 
prisoner is paroled or completes his 
prison term, he is encouraged to 
take his books back with him to 
his home community and to con- 
tinue in the ABE program in that 
locality. 

Vocational Programs 

There has also been cooperation 
between several institutions of the 
Community College systems and 
prison units in setting up a num- 
ber of vocational courses for pris- 
oners, Woodhouse said. This trend, 
and the proposed development of 
release centers for parolees or dis- 
charged prisoners, could lead to 
considerable improvement in re- 
habilitation. 

Part-time instructors for the 
ABE classes are mostly certified 
teachers recruited by the Com- 
munity College institutions. In ad- 
dition, there are about 35 full-time 
teachers who have been employed 
in the program for felons. Two 
teacher training institutes and an 
in-service conference have been 
held at the Prison Department's 
Personnel Training Center in San- 
ford; 104 teachers took part in the 
most recent institute in March. 

Through these training sessions, 
instructors are familiarized with 
prison policies and procedures, the 
System for Success reading pro- 
gram materials and instructional 
methods, and the rehabilitation 
programs already in effect in the 
prison system. 

Following through with the pro- 
gram merger, the Community Col- 
lege system will gradually assume 
responsibility for financing the 
basic education classes, as avail- 
able funds permit. 



$400,000 in State Funds 
Added to Lunch Program 

The State Board of Education 
has requested release of over 
$400,000 for distribution among 
the public school systems of the 
State to provide additional school 
food services. 

The funds represent this fiscal 
year's portion of $808,732 appro- 
priated by the 1965 General Assem- 
bly for the current biennium at 
the request of Governor Moore — 
the funds to be used in the event 
the Federal school programs did 
not cover "all the hungry children 
in North Carolina." In November 
the State Board voted to hold the 
funds in abeyance until programs 
under the Elementary and Second- 
ary Education Act got under way. 

At the April 7 Board meeting 
Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Su- 
perintendent of Public Instruction, 
reported that some $5 million in 
ESEA funds are going for school 
food and lunchroom operation in 
North Carolina. However, he point- 
ed out, some schools who have 
needy children are not receiving 
ESEA funds. 

Since the schools eligible for 
ESEA funds cannot be discrimi- 
nated against, the Board voted to 
appropriate the funds to each 
school unit on the basis of the 
latest available daily attendance 
records. School systems with 
ESEA-supported food programs 
and also those without such pro- 
grams can use the funds to supple- 
ment food services where it is most 
needed, it was pointed out. 



Topics at Law Conference 

The 13th annual School Law 
Conference will be held at Duke 
University June 21-22 and will in- 
clude many topics of interest to 
educators. All sessions will be held 
in the new Law Building. 

Among the presentations to be 
included in the conference are 
"Teacher Negotiation Status" ; 
"Racial Imbalance in Northern 
Schools and the Federal Courts" ; 
"Behind the Scenes in the Supreme 
Court"; and "The Influence of Fed- 
eral Government on the Future of 
Public Education." 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



SO 
SO 
Os 













O 






> 






a 






Z 


to 




E 


LLt 




13 


Q 




ai 








< 




>- 


oc 




si 


m 




0.2 


X 






U 




<u c 


< 




3 £ 


UJ! 




CO 


1— 




c 


Q. 




o£ 


to 


< 


o £ 

Q o 


O 


Of 
UJ 


5 


c= 


u 




Q 






[LIU| 






z 






o 












to 






to 




>. 


< 




3 


to 






uu 












h- 






3 






Q 


t 

UJ 

_l 
CD 
< 

1- 





cn 


in 


■* 


m 


o 


n 


in 


CN 


o 


m 


rs 


in 


q 


r— ' 


iv 


CN 


Ov 


I/i 


CO 


CN 


rv 


d 


-o 


CO 


rv 


rv 


CN 


1 


■* 




l— 


" 


CN 


CN 


ro 






N" 


CN 


m 


*q 


m 


o 


in 


_ 


_ 


_ 


00 


in 


rv 


O 


ro 


iri 


i/i 


cn 


-o 


ri 


ci 


in 


- 


CO* 


CO 


<d 


■<r 


- 


o 


|v 


in 


o 


o 


o 


■sf 


LO 


o 


-^r 


in 


•o 


•o 


lv 


00 


00 


00 


in 


iv 


o 


O 


o 


i — 


■— 


r— 


— 






r— 


CN 




~~ 


00 


CN 


■ 




"~ 


Ol 


CN 


tv 


hs 


in 


■<t 


m 


CN 


o 


OJ 


^ 


CN 


■o 


CO 


O 


O 


rv 


o> 


CN 


00 


m 


rv 


*o 


— 


m 


rv 


t— 


CN 






" 


-* 


ro 


oo 


CN 


CN 


CN 


CO 


"" 


"" 


CN 


o 


in 




CO 


o 


00 


o 


o 


*o 


■t 


in 


«o 


in 


-o 


o 


iv 


^r 


CO 


>o 


m 


in 


■* 


00 


in 


in 


rv 


in 


-o 


ai 

c 

o 


ci 


cn 
a> 


CM 






CN 


-*r 


in 










cu 


























o 






















E 


D. 
















Ul 


xi 






■6 


XI 






m 










O 
















01 












o 


w 


a 

E 

D 


"D 


o 






"a 










01 


cu 
oi 

u 


o 

(1 

0) 


O 
O 

n 


01 
01 

> 


XI 

o 
u 

0) 


w 


D. 
X) 








o 


o 

E 

Ol 


o 

XI 


X 


CI 


c 


a 


X 


01 


C 

o 










c 


C 
(1) 

o 


u 

c 


o 


a) 

J3 


.3 

E 

3 


"o 


01 

> 


.V 
o 
o 


"6 



c 

01 


o 
c 
o 


Ol 
01 

o 


o 









o 








01 


_a 


c 




£ 


u 


01 


3 

o 




Ol 


Dl 


Ol 






01 








c 
c 
o 


o 

c 

CU 


C 

c 
o 


C 
C 

o 


c 




o 

01 


Ol 

c 


-2 

Ol 


Ol 

c 


Ol 

c 


Q 
Ol 

c 


XI 

c 
o 


c 


c 


c 
J* 
o 
H 


c 


c 


c 


c 


0) 


c 
a 

> 


u 
a 


o 


01 

r 




5 


o 

•• 


o 

> 


a 
S 



u 


o 

0- 


a. 


o 
U 


O 

5 


U- 



























a 


r- 


o 


■o 


in 






a 






> 


CN 


<> 


(N 


r-' 






>• 

01 






Z 














Z 






E 

o 


•O 


CN 


^r 


IV 






E 
o 






■a 


>6 


rC 


6 


CO 






■D 


























o 














01 






i/i 














W1 






. >* 














, >. 


























o-z 






CN 


-o 






o ■= 






u C 


ON 


CO 


CN 


di 






u 
u c 






0.2 




" 


" 


CN 






0.2 






o c 

3 £ 


CO 


<3 


CN 


in 

00 




i- 

O 


a c 

.t 01 

3 £ 

CO 




(J 

z 


c 

>.o 


CO 


^_ 


Ov 


r^ 




a. 


c 
o £ 

>.o 




ft. 

Ul 
UJ 




d 


1^ 


o" 


Tf 










o 2 

O o 


m 


>t 


CO 


CO 




_l 
< 


o £ 

a o 




^ 


5 












Z 


5 




Ul 














o 






u» 








c 












3 








o 






1- 






O 








u 

3 






u 






z 












3 














4^ 






C£ 














c 






1- 


















i/i 














•y 






z 














V 


c 




~ 








>s 


o 




o 


o 






>- 






3 




01 




01 
U 01 






3 






a 


_o 


c 


01 






a 








c 


Ol 


c 


c o 














01 






_c 














> 




o 


in u 














Ol 

a 


01 

a 


E 
o 


'a oi 














o 


o 


o 


a 










m 




Q. 


Q. 


Ol 


gS 
.h^; 




o 






UJ 




Ol 


Ol 


c 


ul Ol 




Ul 






_i 




c 


c 


o 


c! 3 




_i 






03 




3 
C 




Q. 


o o 




CQ 






< 




01 






< 






1- 




a. 


■y^ 




H 





m 


■t 


in 


o 


o 


O 


r^ 


.— 


>o 


^f 


o 


c* 




" 




CO 


CN 


CN 


in 


o 


o 


CN 


O 


00 


CN 


<o 


00 


o 


•O 


O 


CN 


in 


o 


m 


in 


o 


o 


iv 


-* 


CO 


■o 


CN 


CO 


■>i- 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


rv 


« 


IV 


CO 


o 


CO 


CO 


CN 


CN 


CN 


CN 


w ~ 


in 


rv 


m 


o 


m 


CN 


CO 


CO 


o. 


-* 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 




XI 


Ol 

c 
c 


01 










o 






Ol 

o 


u 

u 


2 

Q. 


Ol 

a 
>. 


01 

E 
o 


XI 

o 






3 




Ol 


01 


Ol 

c 


3 


o 

Ol 


a 


o 

a Tl 
>N 


a 

Ol 

c 


01 


X) 


o 


Ol 

c 


C.2 
= 


o 

r 


XI 


01 






X "3 


i/i 


o 


X 


Ol 

c 


XI 


'i-2 


Ol 

c 


Ol 

c 

Tl 


Ol 

c 
o 


u 

D 


Ul 

c 


gx 
tiiX 


3 
XI 


n 


C 




s ? 


!_ 


cii 


3 


o 






C) 


o± 


H 


U 


< 


< 


(J 



>- 
< 



+= a> o 

^ c; -p 

"" P-< C3 

u o S 

rC CU „ 



W E 

Q> O 

!2 m 
•- Ul 

< 2 

"51 

a ■*■ 
o 

(0 > 

8 S 
* I 

WO 

.E 

£| 

o Z 
u ■*- 

-3 S 



CO CO 

CD rn 
O bo 



if ^ o 



."-, « 



ui S 
.S-o 

c ■> 

ccj 73 

p..S 






> n 

• rt CD 

u S 

CD O 
ccj 



CD to 
C cS 



^H ^ 



o.2 

C 03 

« «H 

c o 

CD 
i! <D 






C C 



O c3 



CD CD 

X5 -Q 



Pi 
<« ^ .2 



bfi 



C .S "O 



■^ fe 



rfl "h 



u CD 

_, O 
R CD 

.2 to 



CD bO 

pC i- 

■+J CD 

bo CD 

C 
o 

II 



CD 
. . +-i 
hOtn 
C o 

? = 

O 03 



<D c3 

<D 
CD * 



& 



« c* 



P(. 



S C ° 

rt *C p) 

S"p O 

C cS 2 

•- 1 o 2 

m -a y 

££ g 

g s ° 



& C rt 
C "M 0) 



S £ 



» » i 

s ■» 

- £ g 

■pg S 



o 



a "^ . m r-> 



^O 



^ 



1-> !-t 

m -P » to 

CO m r-. .^ 

c. c g^C 



ft s 



O co 



ccJ "« '"-i 

" O o 

m ^ « 

c3 -5 ">3 



T3 cj 
CD "C 

a po 

CO B 

c -2 

CD S 
CD CD 

g s 

^ <s 

"ii CD 

co P 

. CD 

° "K 
V, t 

w : 
c m 

o 2 

CD >, 
•C PO 1 



pO 

o 3 

§? 

<D 

a? 
c 

O co 

co CD 

-h T3 

CD 3 

a +-> 



CD 



CD 



^3 

M OJ 

c 

cc3 . 

. CD 

CO CO 



3 & 

•3 §- 
CD 2? 

CD CD 
«J T3 
<D th 



■^■tJ-p 



03 .« 



5^ 
O « 

C C p3 
CD O 
cj =m Sh 

fH CD 

CD r-i XI 

P, CD tj 
C 03 

in C <d 

m 9 ■*" 

C CD ° 

•5^.2 

4 s s 
Sh o n 

a co -u 

fe • O CD 



•rH CD 03 

C Q, 

CD cD ^ 
pC pO 



CD 
T3 



CD 



C rt 
O -^3 
C 



> 03 



O 



03 



03 



CD o3 ° 

CD bO g 
> O ° 

SftOl, 
co 2 

p, o3 CD 

a" .2 "2 
c 2*" 

cu ^_ .— 
T3 to O 



CD 
CO g 

CD r 

■3.5? 

cc5 S 



CO p_ 

2 °3 



> CO 
- CD 

S3 

03 ^ 
bo . 



T3 

C "g 

1:3 03 

co & 
CD 

"£"j <D 

■a ^ 

o _>> 

_t_) 03 
CD 

'S bo 

03 CD 

> ^ 



CO 

CD 

OS 

co o3 
CD u 
3 CD 

Eh g 

w o 

CO " 

bo co 

fi •" 
•43 g 



T3 

C . 
03 ^3 



co o3 

C cd 

■3 ° 

03 



C 

3 .2 
c -2 

O 03 

.-. CD 

■SfS 

CD C? 
CD 

.S3 



13 ' J, 

a> "O 03 

C C « 

co CD c3 

co T3 a 

03 ^ 5 

>2— < •;-< 

<D . > 



4J r- 

t3 -S 



a h <d 

T3 CJ£ 

rC -^ 

CD 



X 



d 

a 

03 



-t-> CD 
03 +J 



2 ^ 
o £ 

I— I rH 

■P 03 

ft 



> 

03 

CD 



M 



a 

bo S .£ 



1 1 CD 

3 c .2 

ft g 03 

CU<H S 

5? S -^ 
03 '' -, CD 

ft oS 

I +J CD 

(M C -P 

"^ CD 

■OSS 
co 3^ 

C o «H 

bp3 o 

'co CD 

cd co rs 

■a J- £ 

1 CD f" 1 

2r' 5c <D 

CD O X 



<D .J^ -M 



p- 



rC CD 

h CD 

CD in 

£ -r S 



O CD 

o > 

1^ M 

>J o3 

03S 
CD CD 
C rC 

rd .5 
-P 

o .5 

co 03 

S.& 

bo? 

2 s 

ft » 

CO 

CD -2 

C 



b bO 

TJ3 

c a 
J3 c 

03 O 



03 <N 

ee- 
■1-1 03 

TO r^ 

O CD 

CD 

CD C 

r- Oj 

+3 C 
«C 



I If 



CD o3 
PC 

-^T3 
C 

£ * 

«H.2 

-ij 

03 

a 2 

o a 

1-1 13 



2 

CD 

rC CD 



a 15 
o o 

£^ 

CD 

T3 



03 r* 

f-, 03 
CD +^ 

ft ^ 

o ,2 

T3 
«H 2 

o a 



03 .5 

CD o 
>a -1— j 



ftT^ 
o ° 

ft'c 

a 2 

o3 03 
O 

pq 
c 

O CD 

^C -1- 3 

r— 03 

a -p 
£ ro 



bt 

a 

-l-J H 

C pC 
03 -P 
5-1 

^C 

bo-2 
c 



c 

CD 
- 

c 

. o 

n3 O 

£°- 
a t> 



&H I O 

o a o 

CD >> 

r^2 C CO 

M £ 2 

bO g 03 

bo w CD 



^ ShIC 

CD O 00 

> 

,„ 03 03 



CD 

^3 



03 , 



CD ^O 



p., ,a 

03 



2 :ij 

bo d 






CO 

§• 



<D 

ft CD 



2 > 
CD 

M* £^ 

03 co 
ft 

2 S 



03 O 

bo ° 

a M 

Oi o3 



s ^a "^ 

in o 
• IS o 

m 1§ 



.2 ci c 
cj C o 
2 o o3 

£foo 



b -p 

tl CD CD 

O o o 

O ^ co 

. CD CO 

in ,a <d 

p -*■ > 

«H O 

o > 



ftTJ 

C 

CM o3 

CO 

co a 

CD CD 
T3 T3 

'03 g 
sh a 

03 ft 

cd a 



£ ft J 



03 

o 

T3 

a 

03 



boo 


CO 


O O 


£ 

o3 




fin 


03 >> 


O 



03 



. ft 

„ '5 'S ro 

Jh O .« <— I i 

o 2 -c 

CO ft CD 



: o 



) 



3T3 
1) C 

- o 



- ; 



3 ? ° 

J CD 
"X 

■*■ 0) 

3 0> O 

' u 3 






i. IjiH 

. o 

fi r 



/ - : 
- : a 



CO 



O * 
r-f ■- 

4- £ 
3 4) 

8 -« 

,Q o 

CD 
•* -+J 
10 « 

rH rC 

0) fcO 

•^ '£ 

U rC 



5° a> C 

u to o 

~ ~— > 

0) d) i 5 - 

rC C .£ 
bo 





CN 


in 




in 


«o 


^r 


<; 


oj 


On 


CO 


h-l 


rJ 


CO 


on 


in 


in 


CO 


00 


N- 


■* 


IV 


in 


" 


■» 




>o 




o 


„ 


in 


<o 


o 


o 


in 


CO 


CM 


-<!■ 


00 


CO 


03 


m 


o\ 


CO 


CN 




o 


o 


CO 


m 


iv 


o 


>o 




CO 


in 


to 


r- 


tv 


.— 


*o 


00 


tv 












CN 










in 


o 


o 


00 


^J- 


o 


n 


(N 


CM 


CN 


m 


CN 


o 


S 


CO 


CO 


CN 




^~ 


" 






CM 


""" 


CO 




o 


ro 


tt 


_ 


o 


CO 


o 


o 


CN 


n 


LO 


•o 


Iv 


o 


■o 


vO 


CO 


O 




""" 


""" 






OJ 


1 


CO 


" 






















o 


















u 

.51 














o 


Ol 


o 


u 












01 


c 


D. 














T) 


o 


E 


> 

CD 


o> 










O 
u 


a 
o 

c 
TJ O 


a 

3 


CD 

a 
o 


u 
C 
o> 

o 

a 


o 

u 

eg 

O 


o 
u 






<D 

CD 

a 
o 


o- 


"a 


c 

D 


a 


o 


CD 


CD 


i_ 




oi 

c 


D 


o 


a 
a 


a 




o 
a 


O 


a 
11 

<J> o 


"D 

C 

o 


£ 

Ol 

c 


"O 
O 

O 

X 

o 
> 


01 

X 

> 

o 


1 


o> 

01 

a 
a 


"O 

o 
o 


0) 

o 9> 


Ol o 


Ol 




o 


a> 


01 


Ol 


Ol 


D "2 


^ 3 


c 







c 


c 


£ 


c 


.a -a 




c 


O) 


X 


x 


'X. 


■*- 


01 o 


C 01 


o 


XJ 


c 


o 





o 


o 


o 

ai 


o 


o 


1^ 


CD 


c3 


o 


CD 


X CD 


a 


o 


o 


a 


a 


a 


a 




6 


O 


u 


s 


O 


O 


O 


O 


yl 



3; 
CVO 



in 


o 


o 


tv 


CN 


o 


CO 


o 


-* 


o 


o 


CO 


-<r 


<N 


O 


in 


CO 


m 


-* 


CN 


CO 




in 


•o 


CN 




CN 


m 


CN 


T 


CN 


LO 


CO 


-o 


CO 


o 


o 


in 


•O 


in 


O 


co 


o 


tr 


CO 


1 


m 


o 


in 


^r 


O 


IT) 


't 


o 


in 


o 


CN 


m 


o 


m 


CO 
CN 


CO 


CN 


CO 


o. 


Tf 


CN 


rv 


in 

CN 


o 


-o 


o 


CN 


rv 


o 


m 


O 


CN 


rv 


CN 


o 


m 


rv 


-o 


^f 


CO 


00 


o 


ox 


-o 






















00 


o 


NO 


o 


o 


in 


O 


CO 


^f 


00 


rN 


CN 


vO 


CO 


CO 


, — 


.— 


i — 


■*f 


^o 


CN 


tv 


■" 


"" 


CO 


•o 


-* 


"~ 


CN 


CO 




Tl 




















O 












CD 


E 
o 

Ol 




a 


CD 

a 










c 
o 

o 
o 


E 
o 

X 


c 


2 

CD 


c 


O) 


c 




CD 
> 


c 

CD 

X 


o 

Q. 
>. 

XI 


1 2. 

CD CD 

ax 
u 

D) O 

CD CD 






c 




tT 


Ol 


o 


E 


D) *" 


O 


C 

o 


"O 
O 


"O 




o 


o 

X 
u 

o 

^- 

C 


2 


T3 

CD 




^° 


> 
CD 

a 

CD 


> 

u 
a 

tn 
CD 


o 

XI 
CD 


X 
u 

D 
CD 


a 
o 


T3 

C 

o 

Ol 

>. 

o 
a 


3 
C 

o 

J* 

o 


u 

o 

c 

CD 


0) "U 

ci-2 

E CD 

a 

ox 








D 










X 


C 3 


JC 


-C 


a 




X 


X 


u 


Ol 


u 


o — 


? 


% 


D 


Ol 

c 


S 


S 


Ol 


c 


Ol 

c 


Pp 






















Ol 


Ol 


cn 




cn 


Ol 


N 








L 


c 


c 


> 


c 


c 


c 




> 


> >■ 


n 


a 


a 


01 


n 


n 


u 


c 


CD 


CD 3 


CD 


CD 


CD 


u. 
3 
l/l 


CD 


CD 


u> 


a 


a 


a"o 
to 


X 


X 


X 


-L 


X 


u 


H 



CD C 

cvo 



>» 


h- 




o 


00 


o 


CO 


■ft 


-o 


IV 


•— 


CO 


(N 


— 


CN 




" 


•* 




"~ 




CO 


in 


IV 


CN 


r_ 


CN 


in 


CO 


CO 


-o 


m 


CN 


in 


■* 


CO 


in 


o 


in 


m 


m 


|v 


o 


o. 


IV 

CN 


-o 


CO 


CO 


o 


m 


CO 


o 


in 


CO 


m 


-"3- 


N" 


CN 


•o 


LO 


CN 


•* 


o 


O 


o 


•o 


CO 


CO 


CN 


„ 


_ 


00 


CN 


1— 


CO 


O. 


CO 


■t 


CD 


CO 


CN 


in 


LO 


m 




X 












a 


u 












j 














ii 














o 


c 

CD 








Ol 




X 


O 




E 




c 





01 

r 


O 




E 

O 
u 


m 


CD 

F 








"O 


C 




Ol 


<D 
X 

c 


c 

CD 

E 


o 


o 
o 

X 


CD 
CD 

E 


o 


c 

CD 
CD 

F 


6 
■o 


CD 

cn 


Ol 

c 


o 

*" c 
oi2 


E 
o 

o 


o 
o 


< 

o_ 


Ol 

c 


O CD 
Olj" 

5 c 


CD 

E 


3 s 

x. a 
'C o 


Ol 

c 

o 


Ol 

c 
c 


Ul 

o 
r 


0) 


^! O 


b 


t ° 




CD 


CD 


o u 






















U 


s 


< 


u 


< 


< 


< 



> 0) 






cn c 

^5 a) 
a) u 



cs 03 c 

W CD 

CD y CO 

tn u r in 

Cfi 1h QJ O) 

- S ft^ 

O . QJ 

H ^ +) 



CD 

. 2 

r o 

rC |— I 

° CO 

0) c- 

2 «H 

C O 

^5 to 



"SI 
S 8 

03 ^' 

ft 0) 

CO c 
cjO 5 

o 

Is 



. CO 

co o> 

& ^ 

TO -i-H 

01 03 



03 3 

fa ft 

? o 

T3 



is X 



O) CO 

a o> 



co .-£ 

rH cj 



03 25 

CD S 






CD O 

4-> CO 

O CD 
>a 
S 

OJ LO 

rs <d 



03 

CD ^ 

CO 

'53 • 

-El 



o 
c 


3 


c 
c 


IS 

o 
c 


o 


17) 


c 




CO 


X3 


c 




pj 


Jj 


>o 


s 








T3 


J-' 


«H 


X 


p 


o 


o 








C/J 


> 




r/1 









a 


a 


& 


03 
4) 


c 


0) 



o 
o 
o 
o 

lO 

OJ 

> 
c 

co 

c 

z 



S 2 



CD o3 -S 03 



' : 



S5 



CD s 

S CN 



03 cS 



T3 

C 3 

* CD 

c > 

O CO 

C 

CD 



5 S 



co ■— ; cc 

-3 03 .rt 

irH .rn CD 

-< bee 

CD o "- 1 

03 O 



C rH « 

K - o3 
CD 



:'.- ( 



* - 



N 



S 

+H 

03 
> 

O 

e 
_c 

o 

to 



°3 v 

^^ 

is 

3 03 



CJ rC 
r-H CD CJ 

03 +j o3 
C O) 

O «H •+» 

hP CD 

a <D c 

F bo o 

co o3 >j 
C ^S 
•" 03 

1) ^H 

"-J T3 CD 

a « g 

'53 P <u 

CD O 

ft 03 w 

O 03 03 



I I 
o 

O 03 
01 

+3 

CD 01 
>, 0) 

CD O 



03 S 

S.2 

rH ~M rC 

O co cj 
«H Ol oj 

firlS 

■H tJ+J 
rfi CD 

o x: S 
_ bot^ 

11 o ^ 

DO g >> 

o3 H rQ 

rO 5 



rfi rfi 

CD 'H 

rfi rfi 

r o 



II 

■H rfi 

03 o 

S 53 



pfi 



+J 0) 

rH rH rr- 

O 01 CD 

ftrfi" 

^ C3 tc 

bo 

CD CO 

rC 9 



3 C 
co ra 

CO co 

O -fi 

co 03 

"> ^ 

CD CO 

&§ 

CO U 



03 o3 
ft 



ft ■— 
CD =3 

S rfi 

o 

03 co 
0> 



CD 



O o3 



O co cd 

o>3o 

rH CD CD 03 rfi 

co o3 



aO 



CJ c 
O *■ 3 

15 



c ft-a 



o 


6 
■ 


o 


o 


o 




5 

< 

O 
O 

a. 


CD 

C 
O o 

Z a 
o 
o; 

CD 


o 


6 


d 


in 


O 






CJ 

c 

O o 

Z o- 

CD 
OC 

CJ 


d 


o 


d 


00 


q 

CN 




o 


6 


o 


o 


o 




_i 
< 


c 
o 


o 


o 


d 


o 


o 






c 
o 
Z 


•o 


in 

d 


o 


o 


O 
















Z 


z 














O 


























o 
















z 








































































H 


01 














z 


01 


























U 


£ 














z 


J 














q 


•0 


o 


o 


o 




=> 


3 


in 


in 


■ 

o 


i 
o 


o 




< 


111 


CO 




CN 


O 


o 












CN 




H 
Z 


CD 
> 


o 


d 










-J 

0. 
Ul 

> 


01 

> 


■* 




CN 








CO 


in 
o' 


CN 
CN 


CO 


o 




Z 

o 


CD 


N" 


*-. 


— 


q 

CN 


q 




< 

or 


CD 


ro 


CO 
CO 


O 


CO 


q 

00 
















a. 


-J 














3 


























3 
















Ul 

a. 




























LU 


O 














O 
O 


o 














co 


IV 


CN 


CN 


q 




< 


_l 

o 


O 


o 


>o 


T 


q 




(J 


_i 
o 


q 


rv 


>o 


LO 


o 




CN 


•N- 


in 


IV 


<i 




a 


d 


CN 


<) 


CN 


00 




z 


01 


'd 


CO 


vd 


in 


CN 








■ — 


CN 


■ — 




LL. 

o 


•* 


■* 


-t 


m 


in 




^f 


N" 


N- 


m 


in 
















*3 














o 


'5 


























a 
















cv 


























Z 
















Ul 

u 




























o 


X 

u 














z 


JE 
U 














O 


CN 


•o 


rv 


q 




< 

N 


3 


q 


CO 


CO 


in 


o 




Ul 


3 


CO 


Oi 


CN 


CO 


q 




CO 


CO 


CN 


■* 


CN 




5 


n- 


in 


CN 


d 


•6 




3 


5 


CO 


d 


^J 


CO 


co- 




CO 


CO 


CO 


>o 


CO 




>■ 


m 


in 


m 


T 


CO 




_l 
u. 


X 


N- 


in 


LO 


c-i 


co 


























































_l 


01 

> 














Z 


a 
> 






















c 




H 












X 
















c 
o 












o 




3 












o 
























c 


3 




u. 










c 


3 














c 


3 








o 


CD 

T3 

C 
CD 


C 

o 
U 




O 

H 


c 
o 






o 


CD 

c 

CD 


c 
o 




c> 


c 
a 

a 






o 


CD 

XI 

c 

CD 


c 
o 
O 




CD 
X 


"5 

a 


"> 


c 


CD 

Ol 




Ul (J 

-I Ul 


a 


CD 

X 


o 
a 


'> 


c 


CD 
Ol 




Ul 

_l 


CD 

X 


5 

a 


> 


c 


CD 
Ol 




c 


CD 


01 


CD 




co u. 




O 


ID 

C 


CD 


CD 


CD 




CQ 




u 


u 

c 


CD 


01 


_CD 




o 

CD 


a 

3 


a 

3 


O 




< "■ 


o 


o 

CD 


a 

3 


a 

3 


"o 




< 


O 


o 

CD 


a 

3 


(i 

15 


O 




1- 


a. 


ul 


l/l 


u 




a. 


H 


0. 


l/l 


l/l 


U 




H 


o. 


H 


0. 


Ul 


Ut 


O 





Art Programs in High Sch 
Supervisor Sees Need for 

"Art programs in the public 
high schools of North Carolina 
have tripled since 1960," declared 
Perry Kelly, art supervisor for 
the State Department of Public 
Instruction, who is currently mak- 
ing a status study of all aspects 
pertaining to public school art in 
North Carolina. 

"In terms of the last 20 years, 
art in the high schools of the 
State has expanded from .02 per- 
cent to 33 percent," he said. "And, 
the end is not in sight; particu- 
larly in view of the public's in- 
creasing awareness of the impor- 
tance of art and the monies now 
available through special Federal 
programs." 

There are now 252 art teachers 
in North Carolina, exclusive of 
college personnel, and approxi- 
mately 66 percent of these are in 
junior and senior high schools. 
"This is because elementary teach- 
ers, for the most part, handle art 
in the grades for which they are 
responsible," Kelly explained. 

These junior and senior high 
school art teachers most often 
teach in one school, whereas the 
elementary art teacher, as such, 
is usually an itinerant teacher. 
"Courses in art are exploratory, 
by and large, in the seventh 
grade," Kelly said. "At the eighth- 
grade level art instruction is less 
well defined, but in high school 
it is offered on an elective basis." 
Teacher Load 

Because of the nature of seventh- 
grade art, the teaching load at 
this level is heaviest, sometimes 
with 700 students being assigned 
to one teacher. "Such teaching 
loads," Kelly emphasized, "mean 
that students are exposed to art 
experiences under the supervision 
of an art teacher no more than 
once per week." Such limited ex- 
posure forbids teachers' knowing 
their students, carry-over values 
for students, and storing of art 
work; and recognition of art as a 
prestige subject area. 

At the high school level, Kelly 
pointed out, there is a tendency 
to stress art's vocational aspects. 
"This tendency should be corn- 
batted now even more vigorously 
than in the past," Kelly declared. 



ools Have Tripled; 
More Improvement 

Throughout the State Art I and 
II are general art for general edu- 
cation; whereas Art III and IV 
are intended as level for individ- 
ual specialization, often with em- 
phasis on independent effort 
rather than on formal classwork. 

Kelly was eager to stress the 
fact that much outstanding work 
in art is being done at the elemen- 
tary level. However, he also point- 
ed out that the greatest weakness 
in art education at this level is 
the fact that too few elementary 
teachers are well-prepared in art. 
Time for Action 

"Though there is yet no renais- 
sance in the visual arts in the 
North Carolina schools, there is a 
ground swell which may pave the 
way for a new day in art educa- 
tion," Kelly said. He referred to a 
recent symposium on art educa- 
tion, held at LINC, as encourag- 
ing. At that session representa- 
tives from institutions of higher 
learning, the State Department of 
Public Instruction, the U. S. Office 
of Education, and the public 
schools concluded that "the need 
for legislative action to further 
the cause of art education is ur- 
gent and the time for action is 
now." 



Material From Guidance 
Workshop Now Available 

Career Planning and Develop- 
ment, released last month by the 
Guidance Services Section of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, is a collection of materi- 
als from concurrent workshops for 
counselors which were held last 
summer at East Carolina College 
and at the University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro. 

The workshops, regarded as part 
of the continuing education of 
counselors, aimed primarily at ca- 
reer planning and development for 
students whose careers seem not 
to require a college education. The 
program included instructional 
periods in the mornings, field trips 
to industries in the afternoons, and 
library investigations in the eve- 
nings. Visiting lecturers and group 
discussions were used. 



Jr. High Principals 
Meet in Chapel Hill 

Approximately 100 principals and 
other educators from throughout 
the State were in attendance at 
the ninth annual Junior High 
School Principals' Conference in 
Chapel Hill, April 5-6, which was 
highlighted by a banquet address 
by Dr. Harl Douglass, dean emeri- 
tus of the College of Education, 
University of Colorado. 

Dr. Douglas spoke on trends in 
curriculum, sprinkling his remarks 
with such statements as "Instruc- 
tion in home economics is changing 
from cooking and sewing to buy- 
ing and thawing." He is co-author 
of "The Modern Junior High 
School," described by many educa- 
tors as the "secondary school 
Bible." His address stressed a dual 
program — college preparatory and 
vocational preparation. 

Theme of the conference was 
"Implementing a Junior High 
School Philosophy" and three staf- 
fers in the Division of Instructional 
Services of the State Department 
of Public Instruction discussed re- 
lated state agency responsibilities. 
Nile F. Hunt, director, spoke on 
the overall role of the State De- 
partment, Joe L. Cashwell stressed 
instruction to meet individual 
needs, and Dr. Joseph M. Johnston 
discussed evaluation and accredita- 
tion. 

Role-players examined the theme 
from the point of view of a super- 
intendent, by P. J. Weaver, superin- 
tendent of the Greensboro schools ; 
a college professor, Dr. Samuel 
Holton, University of North Caixt- 
lina; a supervisor, Eugene Johnson, 
Winston-Salem 'Forsyth schools; a 
principal, John Eberhart, Winston- 
Salem/Forsyth; a junior high 
teacher, Mrs. M. H. Johnson, Dur- 
ham; and a parent, Mrs. John 
Dozier, PTA president at Durham. 

Improvement of instruction in 
specific subject-matter concerned 
three discussion groups : language 
arts and social studies, mathema- 
tics and science, and health and 
physical education. The conference 
was sponsored by the Junior High 
School Principals of North Caro- 
lina, the State Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction, and the School of 
Education, UNC. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Special Education, Vocational Rehabilitation 
Join Forces For Outstanding Accomplishments 



The first joint effort of special 
education and vocational rehabili- 
tation forces, to offer a comprehen- 
sive program for the rehabilitation 
of handicapped students in the 
schools of the State, has been 
labeled "an outstanding success." 
The approach of the Central School 
Education and Rehabilitation Cen- 
ter in Winston-Salem to the prob- 
lems of mental retardation and 
serious physical disability is now 
serving as a pattern for other 
school units. 

The Winston-Salem center open- 
ed on June 1, 1964, a joint effort 
of the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation and the Special Edu- 
cation Department of the Winston- 
Salem/Forsyth County schools. It 
is financed by local and State funds 
and a special grant from the Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation Administra- 
tion. Some 250 students, between 
the ages of 15 and 21 years, are 
now enrolled. The professional 
staff consists of seven in the ad- 
ministrative area, 15 instructors, 
two rehabilitation counselors, a 
work evaluator, a job development 
specialist, a social worker, and a 
psychologist. 

Positive Attitudes 

Every student is being trained 
in a vocation for which he is suited 
— the special services including 
educational and vocational prepara- 
tion; job training, evaluation, and 
placement; counseling and social 
service; and testing all areas of 
proficiency. The student also is 
helped in developing a philosophy 
of life, including positive attitudes 
toward work, toward school as a 
preparation for work, and toward 
people with whom he comes in con- 
tact at school, at work, at home, 
and in the community. 

Each "graduates" when he has 
obtained the necessary skills to 
make a successful occupational ad- 
justment — when he is able to live 
independently and take a contribut- 
ing role in the community. 

The training program is a dual 
one — academic and vocational. 
Reading and language development 
increases the student's awareness 
of others and helps him understand 
and react to the communication of 



others. Social studies teach him the 
role of the individual in the family, 
school, community, and the nation. 
He learns about the interaction of 
people as they live and work to- 
gether, the needs and problems that 
people have, and how these can be 
answered and solved. Mathematics 
provides the student with a well- 
rounded knowledge of the functions 
and processes needed in the course 
of everyday life. In each of these 
four academic core areas, the em- 
phasis is on the practical — learn- 
ing for living. 

Supplementing the core subjects 
are driver training; arts and 
crafts; and pre-vocational courses 
— an industrial shop giving experi- 
ences in painting, carpentry, etc.; 
home economics classes which in- 
clude sewing, food service, home 



care, etc. ; and commercial courses 
in such things as typing, filing, 
sales and stock clerking. Balancing 
the educational program, the center 
also provides job training. 

During the current school year 
similar programs have been de- 
veloped by the Raleigh, Guilford 
County, and Asheville school sys- 
tems. Plans are under way for 
the 1966-67 school year at New 
Hanover, Greensboro, Durham, 
and Charlotte-Mecklenburg. Other 
systems interested in a Special 
Education/Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion joint program may secure ad- 
vice and assistance by contacting 
Dr. Felix S. Barker, Director of 
Special Education, State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction ; or 
James T. Yates, Assistant Director 
of Fiscal Services, Division of Vo- 
cational Rehabilitation, State De- 
partment of Public Instruction. 
Both offices are located in Raleigh. 



Guidance Group Names Hennis President-Elect 



Dr. William M. Hennis, consult- 
ant in guidance for the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, is 
the new president-elect of the 
North Carolina Personnel and 
Guidance Association. 

He was elected at the associa- 
tion's annual convention in Char- 
lotte March 18-19. Dr. Ralph G. 
Hester, dean of students at St. 
Andrews Presbyterian College at 
Laurinburg, was installed as presi- 
dent of the association. Dr. Hennis 
will succeed Dr. Hester in the 
presidency when the 1967 State 
meeting is held next spring. 

Other new general officers for 
the coming year are Mrs. Mary 
Alice Moody of Grimsley High 
School in Greensboro, secretary; 
and Junius Capehart, director of 
personnel services for Sandhills 
Community College in Pinehurst, 
treasurer. 

Another State Department staff- 
er, Miss Kathryn Marie Ray, as- 
sistant supervisor of Guidance 
Services, was named president- 
elect of the Vocational Guidance 
division of the association and 
also secretary-treasurer of the 
Counselor Education and Super- 
vision division. 

Division Heads 

The association has four divi- 
sions and their new presidents are: 



College Personnel, Dr. Thomas El- 
more, dean of students at Wake 
Forest College ; Counselor Educa- 
tion and Supervision, Dr. Henry 
Weitz, director of the counseling 
center at Duke University; School 
Counselors, Chester Misenheimer 
of Concord High School ; Vocational 
Guidance, Mrs. Ruth Miller of East 
Rowan High School. 

Dr. Hennis has been with the 
State Department for five years 
and prior to that time he had 
served as a teacher and counselor 
in Forsyth and Randolph Counties. 
He holds the M. A. degree from 
Appalachian State Teachers College 
and the Ed.D. degree from Duke 
University. 

A highlight of the Charlotte 
meeting was a panel conducted by 
members of the State Department 
and entitled "Guidance in North 
Carolina — Past, Present, Future." 
Participating were Miss Ella 
Stephens Barrett, supervisor of 
Guidance Services for the Division 
of Vocational Education; Mrs. 
Frances Johnson and Miss Ray, 
assistant supervisors on Miss 
Barrett's staff ; and Dr. Hennis and 
Miss Thelma Cumbo, consultants in 
guidance for the Guidance and 
Testing Services section of the 
Division of Instructional Services. 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



11 



Educators Predict Tax-Supported Kindergarten 
Program for State and Nation at NCACE Meet 



Two education leaders, in sep- 
arate talks before the annual meet- 
ing of the North Carolina Associa- 
tion for Childhood Education held 
on the campus of Salem College in 
Winston-Salem last month, pre- 
dicted that tax-supported kinder- 
gartens are on the way in North 
Carolina and elsewhere in the 
United States. 

Dr. Dell C. Kjer, president of 
ACE International and professor 
of education at Townson State Col- 
lege in Baltimore, Md., said "it is 
surprising that the lay public does 
not know or recognize that early 
childhood education is really noth- 
ing new." Recent research, he said, 
is verifying findings that go back 
to the Middle Ages that early edu- 
cation for all children has value. 

The usual reason cited for kin- 
dergarten education, he pointed 
out, is that it stimulates intellec- 
tual development of the younger 
child. "But the kind of society in 
which we live also provides other 
reasons," he added. Changes in the 
family — such as the increase of 
working mothers — are making it 
evident that some type of supple- 
ment must be provided "to guaran- 
tee the good life for the younger 
child." 

Teacher Shortage 

Kjer said there would be some 
difficulty in finding enough quali- 
fied teachers for a universal kin- 
dergarten program. "The teachers 
to do this job are very scarce," he 
said. "Efforts to provide them will 
have to come along with the pro- 
gram." 

Dr. Richard S. Ray of Southern 
Pines, president of the North 
Carolina ACE, said he is optimistic 
that the 1967 General Assembly 
will approve a pilot kindergarten 
program for the State. Ray, who is 
assistant superintendent of in- 
struction for the Dependents School 
at Ft. Bragg, headed a kinder- 
garden study sponsored by the 
association in 1962. The repoi't 
recommended State-supported kin- 
dergartens in the public school 
system. 

Ray said the association will 
sponsor legislation again next year 
to appropriate some $800,000 to 



set up a pilot program across the 
State. Similar legislation failed in 
the 1963 and 1965 General Assem- 
blies, but Ray said prospects for 
the legislation have improved since 
then. He said his organization is 
working to increase public under- 
standing of the need and that a 
pilot program would demonstrate 
what education can do for the 
younger child. Ray said that Op- 
eration Head Start and other Fed- 
eral programs are giving impetus 
to the kindergarten movement 
and helping the public realize the 
value of good kindergarten train- 
ing. 



Navy Seeks High Schools 
For Junior ROTC Units 

The State Department of Public 
Instruction has been notified that 
the United States Navy plans to 
organize 30 Junior Reserve Offi- 
cers' Training Corps units in sec- 
ondary schools across the nation 
for the 1966-67 school year and 
expand to an estimated 100 units 
for the 1967-68 year. 

The Junior ROTC was made 
possible by the last Congress which 
extended ROTC training, under 
sponsorship of all three armed ser- 
vices, to both public and private 
secondary schools. 

Eligibility requirements for a 
school which desires to establish a 
Junior Navy ROTC unit are, brief- 
ly, that the school agree to — 

• Provide a program of instruc- 
tion prescribed by the Chief of 
Naval Personnel 

• Maintain an NJROTC enroll- 
ment of no less than 100 physically 
fit male students, 14 years or older, 
and U. S. citizens 

• Employ retired Naval person- 
nel, at partial cost to the school 

• Not discriminate on grounds 
of race, color, creed, or national 
origin. 

A school or board of education 
interested should write to the Chief 
of Naval Personnel (Attention 
PERS-C323), Washington, D. C. 
20370. 



N. C. to Participate 
In Four-State Study 

North Carolina will be one of 
four states taking part in a six- 
year study of high school students 
and their educational and career 
decisions. 

Richard Pearson, president of 
the College Entrance Examination 
Board in New York, said the proj- 
ect will be called SCOPE, "School 
to College: Opportunities for Post- 
secondary Education." It is co- 
sponsored by the College Board 
and the Center for the Study of 
Higher Education at the Univer- 
sity of California. The cost will be 
around $640,000 and will be paid 
by the College Board. Dr. Dale 
Tilley, associate professor of edu- 
cation at the University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley, will direct the 
program. 

Aim of the study is to discover 
decision-making patterns among 
high school students. It will include 
the ways in which students acquire 
information about colleges and vo- 
cations; the nature and relative 
importance of parental, school, and 
general community influences on 
their decision; and the various 
stages when the decision process 
occur. A follow-up study also will 
be made to determine how well 
students do after graduation and 
how they view their decision in 
retrospect. 

Testing will play a role in the 
study; however, much of the work 
will be done by interviewing the 
young participants. The other par- 
ticipating states are California, 
Illinois, and Massachusetts. 

Pearson said these four states 
were chosen "because they differ 
from one another in their commit- 
ments to public and private higher 
education. At the same time, each 
state is a leader in the kind of 
education it provides. 

The State Department of Public 
Instruction is to select the partici- 
pating school units. Nile F. Hunt, 
director of the Division of Instruc- 
tional Services, met with a group 
of Western and Piedmont school 
administrators to explain the proj- 
ect on March 30. A meeting with 
Eastern school officials was held in 
Raleigh on March 29. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



NCEA and NCTA Hold Annual Meetings in March at Raleigh 



NCEA Highlights 

"A new and liberating approach 
to ideas about the liability of chil- 
dren to learn" is resulting in fan- 
tastic discoveries, Dr. Francis A. J. 
Ianni of the U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion told members of the North 
Carolina Education Association at 
the 82nd annual convention in 
Raleigh March 24-26. 

Researchers have found that 
children can learn to read at the 
age of two; first graders can be 
taught college calculus ; second 
graders can learn college econom- 
ics ; and ninth graders can grasp 
the conservation of energy prin- 
ciple, he said. An anthropologist 
who has headed USOE's research 
division, Dr. Ianni urged teachers 
to take an active part in educa- 
tional research. He pointed out 
that new curricula must be devel- 
oped "in conjunction with teach- 
ers" or otherwise researchers will 
be "putting out unteachable pro- 
grams." 

Three Tar Heel educators ex- 
plored the topic "Education Suffici- 
ent For Our Times." Chancellor 
John T. Caldwell of N. C. State 
University said the reason for a 
growing lack of engineers and tech- 
nicians in today's technological 
society is "the condition of science 
education in our high schools." He 
particularly cited "the lack of com- 
petent physics teachers." Chancel- 
lor Otis A. Singletary of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina at 
Greensboro urged understanding 
for a student generation that is 
"more involved and concerned" 
than any previous generation. 
Watts Hill, Jr., chairman of the 
State Board of Higher Education, 
urged greater expenditures in 
sending teachers back to school "to 
upgrade their knowledge." 

Hall of Fame 

Dr. Charles Weaver, superinten- 
dent of Elizabeth City schools, de- 
livered citations honoring and 
naming the late Dr. Benjamine L. 
Smith and Miss Mary Frank Mor- 
row to the NCEA Hall of Fame. 

Evander Simpson, superinten- 
dent of Johnston County schools, 
was installed as president of 
NCEA. Other State officers include 



NCTA Highlights 

Education in America "was 
compromised by racism just as it 
was compromised by the parochial 
concept of states' rights," Dr. Wil- 
liam J. Trent, Jr., assistant person- 
nel director of Time, Inc., told the 
85th annual convention of the 
North Carolina Teachers Associa- 
tion which met in Raleigh March 
31-April 1. 

Ironically, he declared, the crip- 
pling effect of racism on education 
came "primarily in those states 
that could not offer a decent edu- 
cation to their children for eco- 
nomic reasons." In these states 
"custom decreed there should be a 
dual school system — separate and 
euphemistically called equal, but 
actually very, very unequal," he 
said. 

Now that political means have 
provided a solution, "I see a much 
enlarged and critical role for the 
teacher and the schools," Dr. Trent 
stated. The schools, he believes, 
have a "residual function" of mak- 
ing up "for the inadequacies of 
the home and the church." 
Frustrations 

Jack Greenberg, director-counsel 
of the NAACP Legal Defense and 
Educational Fund, warned that 
"growing frustrations at the lack 
of progress in integration may lead 
to more demonstrations." He said 
resistance to integration is being 
manifested by "ludicrous efforts in 
deception" — segregation being 
maintained "under a guise." 

Greenberg said the government 
is only enforcing laws it was com- 
pelled to pass. These laws, he add- 
ed, are not self-starters — they need 
a push from the community. Push- 
ing the civil rights issue has bene- 
fited white Americans as well as 

Helen Wells of Asheville, vice 
president; and Frank Greer, North 
Wilkesboro, immediate past presi- 
dent. New divisional presidents are 
Mrs. Ernestine F. Starnes, Raleigh, 
Classroom Teachers; Mrs. Jean B. 
Mobley, Troy, Higher Education; 
Harry Corbin, Franklin, Princi- 
pals; G. P. Carr, Hillsborough, 
Superintendents; Doris Hutchin- 
son, Greensboro, Supervisors; and 
Ray Valentine, Maggie Valley, Fu- 
ture Teachers. 



Merger Discussed 

The proposed merger of 
NCEA and NCTA received a lot 
of discussion at the conventions 
of the two organizations held 
last month. The retiring presi- 
dents of both organizations 
(Dr. S. E. Duncan of NCTA 
and Dr. Frank Greer of NCEA) 
urged their membership to en- 
courage merger. Both acknowl- 
edged there are a number of 
problems in connection with the 
proposed merger that will have 
to be worked out. 

The National Education As- 
sociation has charged Southern 
state organizations to come up 
with merger plans by the na- 
tional convention in July. 

At a meeting of the two 
groups' boards of directors 
March 11 instructions were is- 
sued to the liaison committee, 
formed of representatives of 
both organizations, to develop 
a merger plan to be considered 
separately and jointly by the 
two boards. Meetings toward 
that end started April 13. 



Negroes, he stated. The Brown 
versus Board of Education court 
decision and the Russian Sputnik 
jolted the American people into 
improvements in all areas of edu- 
cation, he declared. 

New Officers 
Dr. Rudolph Jones, president of 
Fayetteville State College, was 
elected to a two-year term as presi- 
dent. He succeeds Dr. S. E. Dun- 
can, president of Livingstone Col- 
lege. Other newly elected State 
officers include Mrs. Ruth Braswell 
Jones, fifth grade teacher at the 
Baskerville School in Rocky Mount, 
vice president; Mrs. Edythe Robin- 
son Tweedy, guidance counselor at 
Booker T. Washington High School 
in Rocky Mount, secretary; and Dr. 
Nelson H. Harris, director of stu- 
dent teaching at Fayetteville State 
College, treasurer. The new presi- 
dent of the NCTA Department of 
Classroom Teachers is Mrs. Doro- 
thy B. Jackson, teacher of biology 
and earth science at D. C. Virgo 
Junior High School in Wilmington. 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



13 






Education Featured in Commemorating 
200th Year of Old Salem's Founding 



Winston-Salem, where the Mora- 
vian congregation town of Salem 
was settled in 1766, is celebrating 
its 200th anniversary this year. 
Salem College, located in the heart 
of Old Salem restorations, made 
special note of the fact that these 
Moravians pioneered in public 
education with special programs 
during March 21-25. 

Highlights of this 200th anni- 
versary celebration program on 
education were a public address 
given by Dr. Willard E. Goslin of 
Peabody College at Nashville, 
Tenn., on the topic "Education and 
the Community," and a panel dis- 
cussion of the same topic which 
followed Dr. Goslin's talk. 

One of the nation's foremost 
educators, Dr. Goslin said there is 
not a school system in America 
which is good enough to meet the 
increasing demands and complexi- 
ties of a free people during the last 
half of the 20th century. "But they 
will be made good enough — even 
if the Federal government has 
to cram improvements down the 
throats of educators," he added. 

Federal Control 

He warned that local control of 
the schools may be lost by default 
because local school officials have 
not accepted the responsibility of 
improving education. Educators, he 
said, are still following the pat- 
terns established 250 years ago 
when Americans were rural peo- 
ple. The needs of rural children 
were relatively simple and the 
things that met their needs are no 
longer adequate, he declared. "My 
father had a more nearly adequate 
education to cope with his problems 
than the children in Winston-Salem 
will have during the next 12 
years." 

In warning about complete gov- 
ernment control over education, Dr. 
Goslin said "my country never 
moves a responsibility from a lower 
level of government to a higher 
level until it finds out that the lower 
level won't accept the responsibil- 
ity." He said the Federal govern- 
ment waited a long time to see if 
local school units would give Negro 
children a chance — it gave local 



school systems more than 100 years 
to provide kindergartens for five- 
year-olds before it established 
Project Head Start. He made a bet 
with his audience that within 10 
years there will also be Federally 
financed kindergartens for four- 
year-olds. 

Dr. Goslin stated that a school 
system capable of keeping America 
free must abandon isolationism. 
"Our whole curriculum is drawn 
from Western civilization," he 
complained. "School children de- 
serve to know something of the 
culture and the problems and re- 
sources of two-thirds of the world's 
population." American institutions 
were criticized for failure to offer 
Russian, Hindi, and other lan- 
guages on the assumption "that 
people of other nations are learn- 
ing to speak English." 

Whose Job? 

Assistant State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction J. E. Miller 
moderated the panel. He said that 
the State Department is setting up 
a Division of International and In- 
tercultural Education and described 
it as "one of our most promising 
ideas." Miller asked the panelists 
whose job it is to decide what the 
public school systems should be 
doing. 

Marvin Ward, superintendent of 
Winston-Salem/Forsyth schools, 
said he was undecided whether it 
should be professional people by 
themselves or with the help of the 
community. Dr. Lois V. Edinger, 
professor at the University of 
North Carolina at Greensboro, de- 
clared that community leaders 
should have an opportunity to work 
with educators. She added that the 
community must begin, however, to 
look on professional educators in 
the way they do doctors. "We have 
passed the point at which we need 
to question the professionalism of 
educators," she said. 

Dr. William H. Cartwright, 
of Duke University's Department 
of Education, urged community 
leaders to accept the responsibility 
for producing good school systems. 
Otherwise, he said, "some other 
agency will have to." 



Old Salem Education 
Program is Popular 

In recognition of the 200th 
anniversary of Salem, the De- 
partment of Education of Old 
Salem, Inc. has announced a 
new series of lectures and tours 
which teachers and students 
will find useful and fascinat- 
ing. Covering a wide range of 
subjects, the lectures are de- 
signed to illustrate life in the 
18th century town of Salem 
and the contributions of the 
Moravians to the building of 
America. 

The lectures and tours are: 
"A Day in Salem, 1780", de- 
signed for the fifth grade; 
"Salem, Congregation Town in 
Piedmont North Carolina," 
seventh grade; "Music, Living 
Tradition 1766 and 1966," 
"Crafts in Salem," "18th Cen- 
tury Architecture, Furniture, 
and Design in Salem," and 
"Democracy in a Communitari- 
an Town." Also, using the re- 
cently opened Museum of Early 
Southern Decorative Arts, a 
program is offered for high 
school students in 17th, 18th, 
and early 19th century archi- 
tecture, furniture, and design 
in the South. 

In the past two years the 
Single Brothers House, includ- 
ing nine craft shops with old- 
time craftsmen at work, has be- 
come a favorite with students 
and teachers. A new Reception 
Center with two elevated lec- 
ture rooms is equipped with 
stereophonic sound equipment 
for lectures and orientation 
presentations. 

Last year 13,000 students in 
375 groups from 31 counties in 
North Carolina visited Old Sa- 
lem. Should it be too late for 
certain school groups to plan a 
tour this spring, lecture-tour 
programs designed to corres- 
pond to curriculum used in 
grades 5 through 12 are planned 
for each school year. 

For full information write 
N. B. Bragg, Director of Edu- 
cation, Old Salem, Inc., Salem 
Station, Winston-Salem, N. C. 



14 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



^Ue AttoJutey Qetielal Rul&i . . . 



Federal Guidelines for Implementation 
of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 

The City Board of 

Education has requested, through 
their Superintendent, 



a legal opinion on two questions re- 
lated to compliance with Title VI of 
the Civil Rights Act. They are as 
follows : 

1. Can any state body, agency or 
department direct local boards of 
education not to sign form 441-B 
and then act as an intermediary 
between the local board of edu- 
cation and the United States De- 
partment of Health, Education and 
Welfare? 

2. If a local board of education de- 
clines to sign form 441-B and fed- 
eral funds are withheld from the 
local board of education would or 
could the state of North Carolina 
or any of its bodies, agencies, or 
departments withhold the release 
of state funds to that board of edu- 
cation? 

Some comment should first be made 
as to certain statements contained 
_'s letter. He re- 



in Mr. 

lates that the school board has no 
reservation about complying with 
local, State and Federal laws. How- 
ever, the Board is concerned as to 
signing Form 441-B because the poli- 
cies contained therein are merely an 
"executive agency's statement of poli- 
cies". 

Section 602 of Title VI of the Civil 
Rights Act states, in part, the follow- 
ing: 

"Each Federal department and 
agency which is empowered to ex- 
tend Federal financial assistance to 
any program or activity, by way 
of grant, loan, or contract other 
than a contract of insurance or 
guaranty, is authorized and directed 
to effectuate the provisions of sec- 
tion 601 with respect to such pro- 
gram or activity by issuing rules, 
regulations, or orders of general 
application which shall be consist- 
ent with achievement of the ob- 
jectives of the statute authorizing 
the financial assistance in con- 
nection with which the action is 
taken." (Emphasis added.) 
Therefore, Congress has specifically 
authorized each Federal Department, 
H.E.W. in this instance, to promul- 
gate rules and regulations to effectu- 
ate the intention of the Civil Rights 
Act. These rules, in effect, are the law. 
If any question is raised as to their 
validity, the proper forum for such 
action is the Court. 

It is further pointed out that Sec- 
tion 602 provides that "compliance 
with any requirement adopted pur- 
suant to this section may be effectu- 
ated" (a) by termination or refusal 
to grant or to continue assistance un- 
der such program— in short, discon- 
tinuing Federal financial assistance, 
and (b) "by any other means autho- 
rized by law". 



As is noted in (b) above, and of 
particular interest to the boards of 
education, Title IV of the Civil Rights 
Act is "the other means" by which 
the Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare can effectuate its poli- 
cies. In plain and simple language, 
if the rules and regulations promul- 
gated by the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare are not fol- 
lowed, the Department can terminate 
all financial assistance AND can re- 
quest of the United States Attorney 
General that his Department prose- 
cute under Title IV. Therefore, it is 
not only unwise but foolish, to think 
that the proper method of attack is 
refusal to sign Form 441-B. To reiter- 
ate, the Court is the only place that 
we can, without cutting our own 
throats, air our grievances. 

Getting back to the specific ques- 
tions, as for No. 1, neither the State 
Board of Education, nor any other 
agency of the State, can direct a local 
board of education not to sign Form 
441-B. Of course, the State Board of 
Education and the Attorney General's 
Office will welcome any bona fide re- 
quest from a school board to act as 
"a buffer" in the event any grievance 
arises between a local board and the 
United States Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare. 

As to question No. 2, if a local 
board of education declines to sign 
Form 441-B, Federal funds being 
thereby withheld, the State of North 
Carolina would withhold the release 
of certain funds to that particular 
board. Specifically, any Federal funds 
allotted to the State Board of Edu- 
cation, as provided for generally in 
G. S. 115-11 (8), would be terminated. 
As for other funds which are now 
supplied the local boards through the 
State Board of Education, we are not 
cognizant of any cases wherein it has 
been held that, where Federal funds 
are terminated, the State also must 
terminate its financial assistance. 
However, I hasten to add this word 
of caution. Merely because a Federal 
Court has not made such a determi- 
nation at this time does not mean 
that such a conclusion will not be 
reached in the near future. Frankly, 
although the State would not want 
to withhold funds, even though a 
board might be acting in bad faith 
in its refusal to sign Form 441-B, a 
Federal Court could, very possibly, 
enjoin the State from paying such 
funds. Attorney General, April 7, 
1966. 



Federal Guidelines for Implementation 
of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act 

In reply to your recent inquiry: 
The Revised Statement of Policies 
for School Desegregation Plans Un- 
der Title VI of the Civil Rights Act 
of 1964, March, 1966, issued by the 
United States Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, contains the 
following statement in Section 181.7: 



"A school system with a voluntary 
desegregation plan must provide 
an assurance that it will abide by 
the applicable requirements for 
such plans contained in this State- 
ment of Policies. Such assurance 
may be given by submitting HEW 
Form 441-B to the Commissioner." 
Based on the above, you asked to 
be advised as to the following ques- 
tions : 

(1) To what is a board of edu- 
cation committing itself when it 
authorizes execution of Form 441- 
B? 

(2) For what period of time would 
the Form 441-B be applicable? 

(3) In executing Form 441-B, is 
the present board of education com- 
mitting its successors, particularly 
in view of the fact that the Form 
states in paragraph 1 that "the 
applicant also agrees that it will 
comply with any amendment of 
such Revised Statement"? 

(4) In executing Form 441-B, does 
a board of education surrender its 
right to appeal, to a hearing, or to 
judicial review? 

As to question No. 1, as Form 441- 
B provides, the Board of Education 
commits itself to "all requirements 
in the Revised Statement of Policies 
for School Desegregation Plans Under 
Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 
1964, issued . . . March, 1966 . . . 
which are applicable to plans of the 
same type as the Applicant's volun- 
tary plan for the desegregation of its 
school system." Furthermore, the 
School Board would be committing 
Itself not only to the Revised State- 
ment of Policies issued in March, 
1966, but to "any amendment of such 
revised statement". 

Stated simply, the Board of Edu- 
cation would be committing itself to 
the present and any future rules 
promulgated by the U. S. Commis- 
sioner of Education. 

As to question No. 2, Form 441-B 
would be applicable and binding as 
long as Federal assistance is accepted 
by the particular school board, or un- 
til that time the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare 
thought it necessary for the Board 
to submit different and further assur- 
ances. 

As to question No. 3, in executing 
Form 441-B, the present Board would 
be committing its successors. As is 
specifically provided for in Form 441- 
B, "(T) his assurance is binding on 
the Applicant, its successors, trans- 
ferees, and assignees, . . . ." The suc- 
cessors would be bound not only as 
to the Revised Statement of Policies 
issued March, 1966, but also as to any 
future statement of policies or amend- 
ments the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare might make 
in the future. 

In executing Form 441-B, a board 
of education does not relinquish its 
right to appeal, to a hearing, or to 

(Continued on Page 16) 



MAY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



15 



LOOKING BACK 

In May issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 

Some 50,000 persons have been 
rehabilitated since the State's 
program of vocational rehabilita- 
tion began 39 years ago, accord- 
ing to the annual report of Charles 
H. Warren, present director of the 
program. 

Ten Years Ago, 1956 

Establishment of community 
colleges was advocated recently by 
D. Hiden Ramsey, chairman of the 
State Board of Higher Education, 
as a way to meet the needs of boys 
and girls desiring a college educa- 
tion. 

Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 

John C. Noe, advisor in Safety 
Education for the North Carolina 
State Department of Public In- 
struction, will visit the Salisbury 
city schools Monday in the interest 
of promoting safety practices in 
the school areas and in the com- 
munity. 

Selective Service Headquarters 
recently announced temporarily the 
postponement of criteria for de- 
ferment of high school graduates 
to enter college this fall. 

Twenty Years Ago, 1 946 

New language texts for basic 
use in the public schools, grades 
3-12, were adopted by the State 
Board of Education at a meeting 
held March 23. 

Charles W. Phillips of Woman's 
College, vice-president of the North 
Carolina Education Association, 
was elected president of that or- 
ganization for 1946-47 without op- 
position at the annual meeting held 
at Asheville, March 29-30. 

Twenty-five Years Ago, 1941 
Winston-Salem will have a 12- 
year school term effective next 
year, it was recently announced 
by John W. Moore, superintendent 
of public schools. 

In a recent survey ... it was 
revealed that the greatest demand 
for teachers in North Carolina is 
in the business education and man- 
ual arts fields. 



School News and Views Around the State 



The citizens of Hoke County on 
March 12 voted approval to a $550,- 
000 bond issue for school construc- 
tion and improvements. 

With the bond money and insur- 
ance money from the partially- 
burned McLauchlin Elementary 
School, additions will be made to 
that building, a new elementary 
school will be constructed at an- 
other location, and other school 
improvements will be made. 



The main building of the Win- 
chester Avenue School at Monroe 
was destroyed by fire on the night 
of March 21. 

The structure served approxi- 
mately 500 students in grades one 
through six. The junior high and 
high school wings of the school 
were saved, as were a shop build- 
ing and gymnasium. The fire broke 
out near the stage of the auditori- 
um in the 30-year-old elementary 
building and spread rapidly. 

Damages were expected to total 
$100,000. Principal J. D. Chase 
said the building was insured for 
$125,000 and its contents were in- 
sured for $10,000. 



Construction is under way on the 
$2 million plant to house South- 
eastern Community College on a 
106-acre site midway between 
Chadbourn and Whiteville on US 
74-76. 

Floor space for the four initial 
buildings will be approximately 
46,000 square feet. The $2 million 
includes construction costs and also 
cost of equipment to be installed in 
the building. Dr. Warren A. Land, 
president, said completion date is 
set for the summer of 1967. 



Guilford County voters on April 
12 passed a $14 million bond issue 
for school construction. 

The three school systems — 
Greensboro, High Point, and the 
county — will receive $13.5 million 
of the funds during the next four 
years. An additional $6 million will 
be allocated through 1969 from 
taxes. The Guilford Technical In- 
stitute will get $500,000 of the 
bond funds to further its capital 
outlay program. 



East Carolina College has re- 
ceived an $18,300 grant from the 
Charles F. Kettering Foundation 
of Dayton, Ohio, to enrich its 
course of study for future physics 
teachers. 

Dr. J. William Byrd, ECC phys- 
ics department chairman, will di- 
rect the program. 



Funds Assist Education 
In Art and Humanities 

The National Foundation on the 
Arts and the Humanities Act of 
1965 provides $15,000 to the State 
of North Carolina to be matched 
by State or local funds for the 
acquisition of special equipment, 
and minor remodeling of facilities, 
for use in providing education in 
the humanities and the arts. 

The administrative framework 
of the Act follows the pattern of 
Federal, State, and local partner- 
ships prescribed for Title III 
of the National Defense Education 
Act which authorized grants for 
strengthening instruction in sci- 
ence, mathematics, modern foreign 
languages and other critical sub- 
jects. 

The State Board of Education 
has added the humanities and arts 
to the State NDEA Title III Plan 
for strengthening instruction in 
the critical subjects. However, 
since there is a marked differ- 
ence between Federal appropria- 
tions available under section 12, 
NFAHA, and Title III NDEA, no 
acquisitions will be approved by the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction under NFAHA which 
would be eligible for approval un- 
der NDEA. 



Attorney General . . . 

(Continued from Page 15) 

judicial review. The rules and regu- 
lations do not provide for such sur- 
render, nor do we believe that the 
Department of Health, Education and 
Welfare could, legally, initiate any 
rules providing for the surrender of 
such rights. Attorney General, March 
29, 1966. 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



North Carolina State Library 

NORTH CAROLINA ' ah 



CHOOL 



^BULLETIN 




Raleigh, N. C. 



Vol. XXXI, No. 1 



September, 1966 



Moore, Carroll Keynote School Head Meet 
And Others Feature Arts and Humanities 

By J. E. Jackman 

North Carolina's Chief Executive and the State's chief school officer 
both voiced concern about the complex administrative problems con- 
fronting school officials in their addresses at the Superintendents Confer- 
ence held at Mars Hill, July 26-29. 

Dr. Charles F. Carroll, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
spoke on "New Days, New Ways," and declared that mergers of units 
would result in better education for the State. He stressed that the 
proper utilization of personnel is of primary concern today and placed 
himself on record as believing the first assistant superintendent in any 
given administrative unit should be in the field of fiscal management in 
order to release the largest number of superintendents for educational 
leadership. 

"In the immediate area of instruction itself," he said, "I do not believe 
we can achieve maximally until every superintendent and board of 
education in North Carolina resolves to help get teachers into the field 
for which they have received their preparation." He also said that if 
the schools of this State are to meet the demands of the day, it is 
essential that they "move more positively and intelligently into the area 
of pre-school education just as we moved into post-high school education." 

Further excerpts of Dr. Carroll's keynote address may be found on 
page 2 of this Bulletin. 

Governor Speaks 

Governor Dan K. Moore expressed apprehension that "the educational 
process seems to be pushed into the background of our time and thoughts 
while the administrative process becomes the prime mission." 

Linking this situation to "the tendency . . . among some of those in 
Washington" to regard the public schools "primarily — almost exclusively — 
as an instrument for social change," the Governor declared that this 
attitude "is a disservice to the cause of education and to the children 
for whose benefit we operate schools." 

"The process of social change is with us, of course, and all of us have 
some degree of responsibility in this area," the Governor stated. "The 
law is clear, and North Carolinians by and large are going to abide by 
the law." He pointed to the "orderly manner in which school desegre- 
gation" is being accomplished as clear evidence "that our people accept 
the change required of them." 

He said "the Federal approach in education should be based on cooper- 
ation rather than coercion." He commended the Appalachian Program as 
a notable instance of the Federal Government's "following the principle 
of equal partnership with the states in joint programs." 

Turning to possible improvements at the State and local levels, the 
Governor suggested that "further consolidation of units as well as 
schools" might be considered "with the view of efficiency and getting the 
best value for each tax dollar." Personnel policies and practices also 
demand attention, he observed. "In the light of increasing competition 
for professional personnel, we should think of making the profession more 
attractive. 

Reviewing recent and proposed developments, he cited the expansion 
of vocational education "with particular emphasis on trade and industrial 
training" as a vital phase "in our efforts to develop job opportunities." 
(Mr. Jackman covers more of the conference on pages 4-5.) 



Three State Meetings 
Held for Principals 

A series of conferences for the 
State's school principals were held 
in mid-August, involving around 
3,000 persons who came to hear 
what is being revealed by research 
and experimental programs in such 
fields as pre-school education, team 
teaching, teacher aides, ungraded 
organization, and the teaching of 
the mentally retarded, disadvan- 
taged children, and the gifted. 

State Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll presided at the meetings 
held in Raleigh on August 16; 
Greensboro, August 17 ; and Ashe- 
ville, August 18. He also reviewed 
the organization of the State's 
services to the public schools, es- 
pecially pointing out the manditory 
and leadership functions of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction. "We much prefer the 
leadership functions over the regu- 
latory ones required by law," he 
said. "Our only reason for existing 
is that we might serve you ; we are 
all working in the same vineyard." 
School Laws 

Assistant State Superintendent 
J. E. Miller reviewed the school 
laws as they apply to the principal- 
ship and pupil personnel policies. 
In connection with the latter, he 
pointed out that rules and policies 
do not stand up in court unless 
written, properly adopted by boards 
of education, and published or 
made known to the public. 

A. C. Davis, controller for the 
State Board of Education, ex- 
plained personnel allotting. Joe L. 
Cashwell, supervisor of curriculum 
for the Department's Division of 
Instructional Services, offered sug- 
gestions for personnel staffing 
and utilization. Nile Hunt, who 
heads the Division of Instructional 
Services, discussed organizational 
patterns for good instruction, en- 
couraging experimentation to in- 
dividualize teaching and learning. 
Continued on page 15 




Idlcational 
Iress 

oci ation 

OF 
MERICA 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except 
June, July and August by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, Education Building, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class 
postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



SEPTEMBER, 1966 



VOL. XXXI, NO. 1 



What do schools and colleges do 
to prepare students to understand 
an unpredictable world? We must 
teach students to learn how to 
learn and to develop a taste for 
learning. We must teach them to 
become more skillful in sending 
and receiving messages by reading 
and writing, by speaking and listen- 
ing, by viewing and observing. 
Students must learn to evaluate 
the incoming messages, become dis- 
criminating readers, viewers and 
listeners. — Edgar Dale, "The News 
Letter," Bureau of Educational Re- 
search and Service. 



. . . The idea of "free public 
schools" is still too much just a 
myth. I was convinced as a teacher 
and principal in rural Kansas that 
the more needy were too often de- 
prived of many educational experi- 
ences by the open and hidden cost 
of going to school. It is time that 
we make education totally free. — 
Robert B. Hayes, Southern Edu- 
cation Report. 



Just as heavy testing is a symp- 
tom of what is wrong with our 
schools, cheating is a symptom of 
what is wrong with heavy testing. 
— George B. Leonard, Look. 



The rate of technological change 
and the development of new infor- 
mation is so great that educators 
scarcely know what to make of it 
all, let alone how to get it taught; 
next week's scientific discovery can' 
make last week's textbook obsolete. 
—Time, October 15, 1965. 



Superintendent Carroll Says . . . 

(Excerpts from address at Superintendents Conference, Mars Hill, July 27, 1966) 

... I invite you to join me in thinking about New Ways in these New Days: Edu- 
cationally, what are some of the characteristics of the New Day? I believe that first 
of all we are having opportunity to see more clearly than ever that the terms "public 
education" and "public school" are not synonymous. . . . Public education today 
encompasses the activities, interests, and creativeness of man at all ages and at all 
places. . . . 

It is also characteristic of the New Day that our reasons for educating people are 
changing. . . . Our objectives can no longer deal almost exclusively with generalities — 
they must be purposeful for people with purpose. 

Another characteristic of the New Day is represented by the multi-agency interests 
and activities in the field of education. . . . Everybody, so to speak, is now in the act 
and just about everybody can get money either from the public treasury or from 
some other source with which to conduct an education program. 

There is a changing concept about number and types of personnel required to 
operate educational programs, both as to adequacy and preparation. . . . We seem 
to have satisfactorily convinced ourselves and others that no longer can school 
systems operate with superintendents, principals, teachers, bus drivers, and janitors. 
In addition, we must have psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians, dentists, nurses, 
home-school coordinators, social workers, secretaries, teacher aides, student assistants, 
curriculum specialists, et cetera. 

. . . The New Day in education obviously suggests and requires New Ways in which 
superintendents must give expression to their leadership function. Planning now 
becomes perhaps the major function for which the superintendent of education is 
responsible. . . . As you know, there is an emerging concept of planning as a separate 
discipline. Advocates and students of this new concept of planning are more and 
more convinced that there is substance to the idea that planning can be perceived 
as a technology or science. They ore equally convinced, however, that the professional 
planner cannot be in possession of the specialized knowledge in a multiplicity of 
fields. The professional planner must have the assistance of a professional in the 
field being studied. . . . 

A second major function of the superintendent in this new way of working relates 
to his responsibility for evaluation. ... In evaluating achievement, it is essential that 
we look anew at the need for and the process of diagnosing the needs and abilities 
of learners. ... A single educational program using the same kind of materials 
presented in the same way will not suffice. . . . 

Looking again at News Ways, it is most incumbent upon us to give more consider- 
ation to the training and re-training of instructional and administrative personnel, 
not just to "renew a certificate," but to train a specific person to teach a specific 
group to accomplish a specific purpose. Increasingly, the training of teachers will 
become one of the major functions of the office of superintendent. . . . 

Another function of the superintendent today and in the future is that he become 
a member of the community's leadership team in formulating significant community- 
wide programs in health, welfare, safety, and other facets of community living. . . . 

All that I have said about the characteristics of the New Day ... is contingent 
upon your having adequate personnel whose primary responsibility is to think. More 
than anything else you probably need key people who can think and who have time 
to think. 

To plan, to evaluate, to train personnel, and to project wisely and productively, 
competent personnel in adequate numbers who can think and financial resources in 
sufficient amount are essential and indispensable. I doubt seriously that any of us 
assembled here today will live to see the day when every county and city school 
administrative unit in North Carolina, as these units are now constituted, has the 
human and material resources that are required. As I have stated in your presence 
before, I do not believe all of our administrative units are big enough or wealthy 
enough to support a first-class educational program except possibly at a highly exces- 
sive and improbable cost. The first step in providing human and material resources 
adequately is to effect merger between and among some of our administrative units. 
Obviously, merger of units is going to upset the status quo and necessitate some 
reshuffling of personnel, but mergers are also going to result in better education, we 
trust, and all else must yield either cheerfully or grudingly. . . . 

Even if we have adequate personnel numerically, I am confident every person here 
will agree that the manner in which they are utilized may be more vastly valuable 
than sheer adequacy alone. . . . Some of you do not have sufficient staff and 
resources and time to permit you to be the superintendent of education that you 
want to be. This is what I was referring to a moment ago when I said that inherently 
weak administrative units cannot get the job done. . . . 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Process Versus Product Learning Educational Leaders 



With change as the most significant hallmark in the world of education, 
no longer can educators always be sure they have the answer. No longer 
can the facts of today be assumed to be the facts of tomorrow. No longer 
can specific values be taught as if they were unalterably fixed, stable, and 
of universal pertinence. 

Because of this dilemma, renewed and increasing emphasis is being 
placed on an old concept, which today, is popularly known as "process 
versus product education." Essentially its significance lies in the growing 
belief that education is something over, above, and beyond the mere 
accumulation of knowledge. Nor do the enthusiasts for "process" learn- 
ing ignore the value of knowledge, the importance of know-how, or the 
inescapable significance of storing information in the brain for desirable 
or necessary retrieval. 

On the other hand, advocates of "process" learning recognize that 
education and learning itself must not be regarded in terms of an end 
product only. Erasmus, centuries ago, insisted that the mind is a fire 
to be kindled, not a vessel to be filled. Arnold in the late nineteenth cen- 
tury insisted that the purpose of education is not to teach man what he 
does not know but to teach him to behave as he does not now behave. 

In "process" education emphasis is placed on the desire to learn and 
freedom to spread one's wings; in "product" education, on coercion and 
the attainment of pre-termined, identical bits of knowledge. In "process" 
learning stress is placed on ideas and on the importance of thinking; 
whereas, emphasis in "product" learning is on unquestioned memorization 
and assimilation. In "product" education purposes are often ambigious 
to students, pump-priming is constantly necessary, and days are long 
with meaninglessness and utter boredom. On the other hand, in "process" 
education motivation is individualized, purposes are clear, and enthusiasm 
is contagious. 

In "process" learning emphasis is placed on how to attack problems, 
how to come to conclusions, how to find answers, and how to develop the 
questioning attitude. Multiple pathways to learning are stressed, with 
great emphasis on the laboratory-centered approach to growth ; flexibility 
of learning experiences is given priority ; and never-ending significance 
is placed on probing, guiding, and stimulating students. Learning becomes 
an adventure in newness — something on-going and dynamic, something 
innovative and experimental. In "process" learning the concepts associated 
with creativity, reason, independence, self -discipline, imagination, re- 
sponsibility, self-realization, and questing are respected and encouraged. 

In "product" learning, with its less comprehensive approach to self- 
realization, emphasis is strong on courses, term papers, examinations, 
grades, and credits. Rigidity, conformity, and authority become the gods 
before which students are required to bow and do servile obeisance. 
Instruction, too often, is stereotyped, with lecturing coming in for exces- 
sive abuse ; assignments are frequently identical ; covering the book over 
and over again assumes top priority; and teaching gets in the way of 
learning. 

What is known about the learning process; what is known about stu- 
dents themselves; what is known about methodology and the significance 
of instructional materials; what is known about testing, guidance, and 
motivation ; and what is known about mental hygiene — all this multi- 
faceted information suggests the growing imperative that increasing 
emphasis be placed on "process" learning at all levels of experience. 

Indeed, "education is a journey, not a destination; a voyage, not a 
harbor!" When administrators believe in this concept of unlimited 
personal growth and when teachers are committed to eliciting the creative 
best from each student, then and only then will students themselves 
become so involved in the process of learning that all experiences take 
on genuine meaning. This type of emphasis on "process" learning merely 
places "product" learning in intelligent prospective. 



As the "executive head" of the 
school, the principal is required by 
the statutes of North Carolina to 
do certain specific things, among 
them "give suggestions to teachers 
for the improvement of instruc- 
tion." No responsibility of the 
principal is more demanding than 
the implicit educational leader- 
ship suggested in this particular 
statute. 

Suggestions which ultimately 
will be of value to teachers in the 
improvement of instruction, of 
necessity, must be based on a spec- 
trum of effective skills, attitudes, 
and understandings which the prin- 
cipal possesses. 

He must know, for example, what 
good teaching is and that this is 
not necessarily the same for all 
teachers, for all students or for 
all time. Teachers expect the 
principal to recognize efforts at 
motivation, approaches toward dif- 
ferentiation in instruction, and 
efforts toward freeing each student 
to do his best. Equally important, 
teachers expect the principal to 
be aware of the subleties used 
in helping to create self-respect 
among all students. In addition, 
teachers expect the principal to be 
aware of research findings concern- 
ing the learning process, grouping, 
testing^ self-evaluation as a learn- 
ing experience, the most effective 
ways of using instructional aids, 
and the like. 

Teachers expect the principal to 
be a good organizer, a cooperative 
planner, a tactful yet forceful pub- 
lic relations person, and one who 
elicits the best from each of them. 
Since teachers desire to grow while 
on the job, they expect outstanding 
leadership from the principal as 
programs of in-service growth are 
cooperatively planned. 

Teachers expect encouragement; 
constructive, specific criticisms. 
Sensitive, up-to-date teachers ex- 
pect an atmosphere in which ex- 
perimentation is possible ; and they 
recognize the significance of the 
principal's role in creating such a 
stimulating climate. 

And, what teachers expect of 
principals is usually what princi- 
pals expect of themselves ! 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Added Funds Voted For 
Three School Systems 

Of three referendums seeking 
additional support for public schools 
which were presented to voters last 
May 28 — at the same time the pri- 
mary elections were held, two were 
passed and one was lost by a vote 
of almost three to one. A fourth 
referendum on July 30 for a teacher 
pay supplement was passed. 

Voters in Alamance County 
passed an $8.5 million countywide 
school bond issue for capital im- 
provements. The county system is 
to receive $4,842,450 and the Burl- 
ington system will receive $3,657, 
550. 

Raleigh voters agreed that the 
school supplemental tax limit could 
be increased from 32 cents to 50 
cents on each $100 of property valu- 
ation. In preparing its school bud- 
get for the 1966-67 year, the city 
school board recommended the 
supplemental tax rate for the year 
be set at 45 cents — an increase 
from 31 cents in 1965-66 on each 
$100 of property valuation. The in- 
crease gives the city system $464,- 
800 in additional funds— $208,642 
to increase the local supplement to 
teacher salaries, and $182,750 to 
hire an additional 42 teachers. 

In Mecklenburg a proposal to 
raise the property tax rate six cents 
to provide pay raises for teachers 
was defeated. Had the referendum 
succeeded, the limit on the school 
supplement tax would have been 
raised from 54 to 60 cents per $100 
of property valuation. The increase 
would have provided an additional 
$650,000 which the Charlotte- 
Mecklenburg system had promised 
to use only for teacher salary 
raises. It was the first rejection by 
Mecklenburg voters of a tax raise 
or bond issue since 1933. 

Chatham County voters on July 
30 approved paying a teacher sup- 
plement, agreeing to tax themselves 
as much as 20 cents on each $100 
property valuation. The County 
Board of Commissioners decided 
that for the 1966-67 fiscal year, 
only 10 cents per $100 valuation 
would be necessary to raise $66,100 
for the upcoming year's teacher 
salary supplement. 



Technology Must Not- Outdo Humanities 

Employing an unusual and effective approach, Dr. Douglas M. Knight, 
president of Duke University, discussed the essential spirit and function 
of the humanities in his address at the conference. Introduced to the 
audience by Dr. Carroll as "a teacher who can breathe life into dry 
bones," he proceeded to deliver several general observations about edu- 
cation, science, and the humanities. 

Then he showed what he meant by reading and commenting sparingly 
on two poems — John Holmes' "Map of My Country" and Edith Sitwell's 
"Heart and Mind" — and several passages from Mark Twain's "Old Times 
on the Mississippi." The readings were not offered as illustrative or 
incidental features of his address but rather as the substance enlivening 
the context of his remarks. 

Education in the humanities, he indicated, is primarily a matter of 
encountering and reflecting upon such works of art, and the teacher's 
main role is to present them effectively and relevantly. His method of 
presentation was designed to convey the significance of the idea that 
a work of art is "organic," affecting people rather like an encounter with 
another human being, "extending the world we know in a very special 
way by revealing the unknown in the familiar." 

Science and technology also serve human beings, but they do not "ex- 
tend us directly as people" as the arts and humanities do, Dr. Knight 
observed. The scientist tends "to proceed from things that are known 
to those that are unknown through experiment and verification of 
hypothesis." Undeniably great as the benefits of science and technology 
are, these disciplines are not by themselves capable of producing the 
discernment which the arts and humanities can evoke, he maintained. 

Continued on page 16 

Giannini Urges Exposure to Best in Art 

Dr. Vittoria Giannini, president of the North Carolina School of 
the Arts, described its program and objectives in his address at the con- 
ference. Stressing the unique role and status of the State-sponsored 
professional center at Winston-Salem^ he outlined a division of responsi- 
bilities between the public schools and the School of the Arts. 

Dr. Giannini, a composer-conductor, has headed the school since it was 
established two years ago. The North Carolina School of the Arts, he 
observed, is also unique in combining a program of professional edu- 
cation in the arts — music, dance, and drama — with an academic program 
covering the standard subjects in the public school curriculum. "We 
hope to add painting and sculpture," he said. 

The program is designed to make it possible for exceptionally talented 
students to experience the benefits of instruction and practice in the 
arts under the supervision of highly-qualified professionals over a period 
of a year. At the same time, the student pursues an academic course of 
study which could qualify him for entry into a regular college or uni- 
versity if he should decide against a career in the arts. 

While there are in this country a number of excellent "higher level" 
schools for the professional training of artists, he noted, there has been 
a distinct lack of opportunity for promising students to begin this 
systematic training early, when it will do the most good, and to con- 
tinue right on if they maintain their interest and progress. This is why 
high school graduates entering these professional schools are required 
to take courses in fundamentals which should have been mastered earlier. 

The School of the Arts is designed to help fill this training gap by 
accepting students at whatever age they demonstrate talent sufficient to 
warrant intensive training, Dr. Giannini said. Each year, the perform- 
ance of each student is reevaluated by a jury of professionals to determine 
if he should continue. 

The role of the public schools is twofold, he said. First, to refer 
Continued on page 16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Conference Gleanings 

The following quotations are excerpts from panelists' comments presented 
under the topic heading "What We Are Learning . . ." at the Superintendents 
Conference held July 26-29 at Mars Hill and the Principals' Conferences held 
August 16, 17, and 18 at Raleigh, Greensboro, and Asheville, respectively. 

Team Teaching — We are finding that the quality of educational planning is 
being materially upgraded by teachers planning together. Actually, this oppor- 
tunity for teachers to work together with some intensity is proving to be a 
top-flight in-service education experience. — Superintendent C. C. Lipscomb, 
Reidsville 

There is some evidence that by diagnosing problems and seeing the same 
students in different settings the usual three-teacher team is getting to know 
85-90 students as well as, if not better than, one teacher often gets to know 
her typical classroom group. With few exceptions, pupils have shown remark- 
able adaptability in adjusting to two or more teachers. Pupils appear to become 
more responsible for their own actions, more poised, less shy, and more 
mature. . . . We are finding that changes in group membership and group 
structure do not upset children if these changes are educationally sound. — 
Woodrow B. Sugg 

Education of Handicapped Children — In the early 1900's, educators began 
to recognize that the similarities between the handicapped and the "average" 
children are more significant than the differences. Only within the last 25 
years, however, have the public schools really begun to assume responsibility 
for these children. Not until 1959 did Congress specifically earmark aid for 
the education of the handicapped. . . . Even now, only one handicapped child 
out of four has a specially trained teacher. — Nile F. Hunt 

This past year, we have had an opportunity to work on a joint program of 
Special Education and Vocational Rehabilitation located within the school 
system. This program is not designed to substitute for, nor to take precedence 
over the Special Education services now established in the schools. Rather, it 
is designed to make available to handicapped students on the secondary level 
the various services of Vocational Rehabilitation. — Robert Lassiter 

Preschool Education — In 1963, the Bureau of Census reported 2.2 million or 
about 54 percent of the nation's five-year-olds enrolled in kindergarten — 44 per- 
cent in public kindergartens, 10 percent in private — and 42 states reported 
enrollments in public kindergartens to the U.S. Office of Education. ... In 
North Carolina, there are 340 licensed day care facilities serving 8,000 children. 
These are mostly privately operated. It is estimated that two or three times 
this number of unlicensed day care facilities are in operation. Last year, 145 
nonpublic kindergartens filed reports with the State Department of Public 
Instruction. These service approximately 4,000 children. Eighty-two of these 
kindergartens meet minimum standards for approval; 65 are not approved. . . . 
An ACEI study in 1962-63 revealed that 13,000 children, or only 15 percent 
of the 80,000 five-year-olds in the State, were attending kindergarten. — Marie 
Haigwood and Helen Stuart 

Disadvantaged Children — Between 45 and 50 million dollars has been spent or 
is being spent under Title I ESEA this year. The amount being spent equals 
45 to 50 dollars per pupil for each pupil in the public schools of this State last 
year. But all schools were not eligible to receive aid and all pupils attending 
eligible schools did not receive aid. Taking these two factors into consideration, 
it is estimated that at least 150 dollars is being spent for each participating 
pupil. . . . Local ESEA projects called for a total of 8,979 full-time and 547 
half-time persons, including approximately 3,000 teachers. This total does not 
include hundreds of people employed to administer the program — program 
coordinators, secretaries, bookkeepers and other clerical personnel. If all the 
personnel requested had been employed, it would have consumed no more than 
half of the available money, leaving the remaining half for the purchase of 
facilities, equipment, and materials ranging from the construction of buildings 
to the purchase of aspirin. — Joe Cashwell and Joseph M. Johnston 

Education of Gifted Children — There is a high percentage of our brighter 
students who never attend colleges and a very large number of those who 
attend never obtain a degree. Though we could suggest many reasons for this 
waste of human resources, the percentages are too high for educators to fail 
to accept some of the responsibility. For example, surveys show that less than 
two-thirds of our better students enter colleges and only about one-third of 
these ever finish. — Eugene Burnette 

There is nothing quite like performance with other talented fellow artists 
under the leadership of outstanding teachers to stimulate insight and learning 
in young students of the performing arts. . . . By bringing together the most 
talented youngsters from over the State, the Governor's School makes possible 
(for the first time in many cases) this interstimulation among talented peers 
under instructors of proven excellence. Constant study, practice, rehearsal, 
and performance together for eight weeks during the summer at the GS make 
possible a learning experience unique in the lives of many talented young people 
otherwise isolated in small communities." — C. Douglas Carter 



Survey Reveals Acute 
Personnel Shortage 

"It is like trying to find oil in 
a dry well," State Superintendent 
Charles F. Carroll said of efforts 
being made by city and county 
school administrators to find teach- 
ers for the 1966-67 academic year. 

In a survey conducted by Dr. 
Carroll as of August 15, the 169 
school systems in the State re- 
ported 1, 862 vacancies in instruc- 
tional positions. Of this number, 
950 were for elementary teachers, 
398 for secondary teachers, 164 
special education teachers, 49 
teachers of vocational education, 
37 music teachers, 30 health and 
physical education teachers, 11 art 
teachers, five teachers of the gifted, 
32 miscellaneous teaching po- 
sitions; 15 principals, 80 librarians, 
27 counselors, 22 supervisors, and 
40 miscellaneous non-teaching po- 
sitions. 

During the current crisis, Dr. 
Carroll said he would recommend 
"larger classes taught by compe- 
tent teachers rather than the use 
of incompetent or insufficiently 
trained teachers. If competent 
teachers are not to be had in such 
specialized fields as mathematics, 
science, and foreign languages, I 
would recommend that the courses 
not be offered," he added. 

A study of reasons for the short- 
ages of personnel revealed that 
normal growth created an increase 
of 541 teaching positions in origi- 
nal State teacher allotments for 
this year; Title I, ESEA projects 
last year called for more than 3,000 
extra teachers, 300 librarians, 150 
counselors, and 250 supervisors. 

Allied Federal programs through 
the Office of Economic Opportunity 
and the Department of Labor has 
drawn personnel from the public 
schools as has expanding programs 
in the State's institutions of higher 
learning. The Civil Rights Act is 
causing industry to hire more 
Negroes — and the shortage of 
Negro teachers is particularly 
acute, city and county school offi- 
cials say. In addition, there has 
been much expansion in Federal 
Civil Service positions, as well as 
increased demands of industry and 
commerce which continue to drain 
individuals from teaching. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



20 Systems Have New Superintendents; 
Seven Principals Promoted to Top Job 

At the opening of the 1966-67 school year, 20 of the State's school 
systems had different superintendents than they had last year at thi^ time. 

Eleven systems are headed by "new" superintendents, seven of whom 
had served as principals last year, three had been assistant superintend- 
ents, and one had served as supervisor of instruction. Four of last year's 
superintendents took posts as superintendents of different systems, one 
became an assistant superintendent in another system, seven retired, 
three are deceased, three left school work, one became a college teacher, 
and one joined the State Dpartment of Public Instruction. 

In the following list, the name of the system's new superintendent is 
given first, followed by his previous position; then the name of the 
former superintendent. 

AVERY: Harry McGee, principal, Cranberry High School; replaced 
Kenneth Anderson, resigned. 

BRUNSWICK: George F. Williams, superintendent, Morven City 
Schools, Anson County; replaced Wm. N. Williams, who died November 19. 

CHOWAN : Hiram J. Mayo, superintendent of Edenton City Schools 
and now heads both units which are merging; replaced C. C. Walters, 
now superintendent of Perquimans. 

CURRITUCK: Franklin L. Pendergrass, principal, Bailey School in 
Nash County; replaced S. H. Helton, now superintendent of Transylvania. 

DARE : Seth B. Henderson, superintendent, Hyde County ; replaced 
Mrs. Mary L. Evans who has joined the State Department of Public 
Instruction. 

HARNETT: Robert Alton Gray, assistant superintendent, Harnett; 
replaced Glenn T. Proffitt, retired. 

HYDE: Allen Dale Bucklew, principal, Mattamuskeet School; replaced 
Seth B. Henderson, now superintendent of Dare. 

PINEHURST (Moore County): Fred Gordon Lewis, supervisor of 
instruction, Carteret County; replaced Lewis S. Cannon who died De- 
cember 5. 

ROCKY MOUNT (Nash County) : Dr. Wilbert Osborne Fields, Jr., 
assistant superintendent, Rocky Mount; replaced D. S. Johnson, retired. 

PASQUOTANK: Franklin L. Britt, principal, Central School; replaced 
J. H. Moore who died in August. 

PERQUIMANS: C. C. Walters, superintendent, Chowan County; re- 
placed John T. Biggers, now head of Albemarle Economic Improvement 
Council. 

HAMLET (Richmond County): A. Woodrow Taylor, superintendent, 
Brunswick County; replaced Maylon McDonald, now assistant superintend- 
ent, Fayetteville. 

ALBEMARLE (Stanley County) : Henry Thomas Webb, Jr., principal, 
Albemarle Senior High; replaced Claude Grigg, retired. 

TRANSYLVANIA: S. H. Helton, superintendent, Currituck County; 
replaced Charles W. Bradburn, now superintendent of Wilkes. 

VANCE: Edwin 0. Young, Jr., principal, Middleburg High; replaced 
J. C. Stabler, retired. 

RALEIGH (Wake County) : Conrad Hooper, assistant superintendent, 
Raleigh, replaced Jesse 0. Sanderson, retired. 

FREMONT (Wayne County) : William Darron Flowers, principal, 
North Edgecombe School; replaced Leland V. Godwin, resigned. 

GOLDSBORO (Wayne County) : Jerry D. Paschal, assistant superin- 
tendent, Goldsboro; replaced Dr. N. H. Shope, now assistant professor 
of education, Appalachian State Teachers College. 

WILKES: Charles Wayne Bradburn, superintendent, Transylvania 
County; replaced C. D. Eller, retired. 

CAMP LEJEUNE (Federal School): Dr. P. Talmadge Lancaster, 
superintendent of Dependants' Schools, European Area; replaced W. H. 
Tuck, retired. 



REL Planning Report 
Now Being Reviewed 

As Public School Bulletin went 
to press, a developmental progress 
report on the proposed Mid-South 
Regional Education Laboratory 
was being prepared for review by 
the U. S. Office of Education. The 
region includes the states of Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina, and South 
Carolina. 

The progress report included an 
assessment of the needs of the 
region, an analysis of the re- 
sources in the region, a proposed 
operational program, specifications 
of the organizational structure to 
implement the program, and the 
resources committed to carrying 
out the program. 

In mid-May a development con- 
tract of $190,00 was given to the 
Learning Institute of North Caro- 
lina, which had been named fiscal 
agent for the Development Com- 
mittee, and LINC's Operations Di- 
rector, Ralph McCallister was 
named Project Director for the 
developmental period. Since that 
time a Policy Committee, appointed 
by the governors of the three 
states, and Problem Area Commit- 
tees have been hard at work. A 
bi-weekly Newsletter has been cir- 
culated to keep educators and the 
public of the region informed of 
activities and progress. 

At a joint meeting of the REL 
Policy and Working Proposal 
Committees on July 22, the title 
"Regional Education Laboratory 
for the Carolinas and Virginia" 
was adopted for the proposed 
laboratory. 

The progress report was due in 
Washington on September 1. De- 
pending on progress made, as evi- 
denced by the report and a site visit 
by USOE consultants and staff, the 
U. S. Office of Education may: 

• Terminate the contract as of 
September 30; 

• Continue the contract requiring 
further work on all or any part 
the developmental phase of the 
program ; 

• Continue the contract for initi- 
ation of pilot activities; or 

o Amend the contract for the initi- 
ation of accelerated pilot activi- 
ties at some additional cost to 
be negotiated. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Introducing New Staffers in the State Education Agency 



The summer months saw a number of promotions, 
changes, and additions to the staff of the Department 
of Public Instruction. Space prevents listing all the 
changes, but we proudly present brief introductions 
of new professional staffers as of August 1. 

Katharine Fanning Brown is a supervisor of Vo- 
cational Office Education with A.B. and M.A. degrees 
in Business from East Carolina College, Greenville. 
She has had a total of 21 years' teaching experience 
in the North Carolina schools and also is an experi- 
enced legal secretary. 

Carroll Ray Calhoun is supervisor of Federal Pro- 
grams for Instructional Materials, and he is experi- 
enced in library work at the junior high, high school, 
and college levels. Since 1961 he has been the super- 
visor of Library Services, Department of Community 
Colleges. He holds the B.S. degree from East Tennessee 
University and the M.A. in Library Science from 
Appalachian State Teachers College. 

Beatrice Hall Criner carries the title of Editor, 
Evaluation Section, Title I, ESEA. She holds an A.B. 
degree in English and music from Monmouth College, 
Monmouth, 111., and has done graduate work at North- 
western University, Wake Forest, and Harvard Uni- 
versity. She has taught Business Education and has 
been business manager of several institutions. Her 
last employment was as chief examiner in the Office 
of Admissions, University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill. 

Clinton R. Downing is supervisor of Project Control, 
Title I, ESEA. He is an experienced teacher, super- 
visor, and administrator, serving last as principal of 
the 0. A. Peay School at Swan Quarter. His A.B. and 
M.A. degrees were taken at Agricultural and Techni- 
cal College in Greensboro. 

Dr. John Dale Ebbs fills a new English supervisory 
post and is on leave of absence from East Carolina 
College in Greenville where he has, for the past six 
years, served as professor of English. He holds A.B., 
M.A., and Ph.D. degrees in English from UNC— 
Chapel Hill. He also has taught at High Point College 
and Texas A. and M. University. 

Claude F. Eldridge is a supervisor of Trade and 
Industrial Education. He holds a degree in math and 
physical education from Appalachian State Teachers 
College at Boone and did graduate study in vocational 
education at N. C. State University in Raleigh. For 13 
years, he was industrial Cooperative Training Co- 
ordinator in the Elkin City Schools. 

The new position of North Carolina Coordinator, 
Regional Curriculum Project, Title V, ESEA, is held 
by Mary L. Evans who has served as a teacher, princi- 
pal, and superintendent in the North Carolina public 
schools. For nearly 15 years she was superintendent 
of the Dare County Schools. Previously she had been 
on the professional staff of the North Carolina Edu- 
cation Association. She holds a degree from Duke 
University, Durham. 

Theodore E. F. Guth is a supervisor of Industrial 
Arts. He comes from the School District of Phila- 
delphia, Pa. where he served for over six years as a 



supervisor. He has a total of 10 years' teaching experi- 
ence in the fields of Fine and Industrial Arts. His 
B.S. degree was taken at Kutztown State College in 
Pennsylvania and his M.S. degree was received from 
the University of Pennsylvania. 

John L. Huffman, Jr., is a supervisor of Intro- 
duction to Vocations. He holds a degree in Vocational 
Agriculture from Clemson University, Clemson, S. C. 
and did graduate work at Clemson University and 
Western Carolina College. He has nine years' teaching 
experience in the schools of Davidson, Gaston, and 
Swain Counties and during the past four years was 
Introduction to Vocations teacher for the Gaston 
County school system. 

Robert M. Langley was director of the Industrial 
Education Center Unit of Pitt Technical Institute at 
Greenville before joining the Department as a super- 
visor of Trade and Industrial Education. He received 
both his B.S. and M.A. degrees from East Carolina 
College and did further graduate work at N. C. State 
University. 

Clarence C. Lipscomb is a supervisor of English and 
Reading and has served the Raleigh City Schools for 
over 15 years as teacher and director of the English 
Department. His B.A. degree was taken at Johnson 
C. Smith University in Charlotte and his M.Ed, 
degree was taken at Pennsylvania State University. 

David Mallette, a supervisor of science, holds B.S. 
and M.S. degrees from Agricultural and Technical 
College in Greensboro. He has taught science in the 
schools of Robeson and New Hanover Counties and 
at Voorhees Junior College in South Carolina. 

Cleo M. Meek is a supervisor of mathematics with 
seven years' teaching experience in Wickenburg, Ariz. 
Both his under graduate and M.A. degrees were taken 
at Northwestern University and he has done additional 
graduate study at UNC— Chapel Hill. 

Ward Rhyne Robinson is another supervisor of 
Introduction to Vocations and has over 16 years' 
experience as an agriculture teacher with the North- 
ampton County and Catawba County schools. He 
studied at Lees McRae Junior College in Banner Elk; 
holds a B.A. degree in Economics from Furman Uni- 
versity, Greenville, S. C; and holds B.S. and M.A. 
degrees in Agriculture Education from N. C. State 
University. 

Carl V. Tart is a supervisor of Vocational Agricul- 
ture and has for the past seven years been teaching 
agriculture in the Wake County schools. He holds 
B.S. and M.A. degrees in Agriculture Education from 
N. C. State University and also did graduate work 
at UNC— Chapel Hill. 

Lawrence M. Tucker is a supervisor of English 
and Reading and comes from Clemson College, Clem- 
son, S. C, where he served as an instructor of Eng- 
lish. He has taught in the Lake County Schools at 
Tavores, Florida and in the West Chester Schools, 
West Chester, Pa. He has a B.A. degree from Stet- 
son University in Deland, Fla. and a M.A. degree 
from Appalachian State Teachers College. 
Continued on page 10 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



so 
SO 
OX 



73 

3 
O 



T/i co 02 co 

o'o o"o 

o o o o 

cj o ej o 



2 cu 



o 

CD 
Sh 

o> 
43 



C 73 



73 
CD 



te 


i— l 


o 


hH 
h- 1 


0? 


41 


01 


-m 


'.''*. 




3 


H 





fi 



43 4; fi £J} 

« y73 

'" — 'cj a * 
m o s £ K 

n-3 ^ m s 

to ea „ — 

" 4) — O 

„r£x I 

o4S .3 o 
fl 41 fe IB 

- *ia> ca 



J3-0 IB 

be S g 

2*2 



S'43 



SH 


advan 
ticipat 

iology 

iiemist 
hysics 
cience 


a 


S 


a 




3 


73 -O 73 73 




C t, 0) CB 0) 0) 


3 
o 


a .5 o cj o o 


■S » s c fl c 


£ 43 ctf cS cS cS 


5h 


-O-w > > > > 


Sh 


73 1..T3 73 73 73 


3 


o 


• "C 



■■how 

C o ft 

«"| >, 

O "-O 

5 3 
o ** 

ficoCfl 



ib aJ£ 
.« — cs 

IB "£ 
>> >> 41 

43 60-3 
41 IS _ 

"B co -S O +» 3 

C 5 a* * 5 W 

«£ g-o bi>.e 

£,8 w^jB-a 



•TH t— ..- 

Hi- 

3 

3 



*" a s 



0> B 01 



-a o> h 



9.S g g'3 fi sg 

-h> > ib o> e w "B 

5 * t- 3 CS 2 

JS^oiojii^gj; 

« a S S s'S'rs 8 

•S C+^ es 1 " °.B^ 
. g o C e bfi_, 

"O eS g ST S i » u 



c6 03 
T3 

a 

a 



S « 






a 



O 50 



C fi 

' > 



.« o 



ai "S 



5--° 



QJ 



a 



c3 

W .fi 



T3 P 

C3 72 



m « hh 



03 0) 
o3 



fi o 
T3 -fi= 



C — 
O - 

S fc 

T3 03 

-^ fi 

o3 

S e 

o o 

5h O 

." CO 



02 



'/: 



-fi •; 



O .2 

ft 

U 02 

o> 

03 J^ 



1 I 

Oi ly 

1 « 



M « S 



4) 60 eS 

■B C - 
+j •,- sa 



B 6u ■* - 

.S S3 oi 
© 60 

cs o 



gSK « Be g'g £rt 15 

0»»c8»»j;- " S-i 
b UR C CD 



ftJ5 



M 



CS 6/0, 
a J3 O 

"a M 
Cm r 
•Cr>.S 



10 IB 



T3 »" J • ' ■ 
01 CO 

co *J Si 

O) cs © 

hi tX' 






60 



coU .- 



.S-'fi 
o ,rH 

fi r^ 

'—i cu 

03 
• o> 

s ^ 

> o 
+3 fl , 

o ■-' 
<v I 

et=j ti £ 

pw C5 i — ' 

c ^ 2 

03 02 -S 



IB 

o 2 g 

E S * 

o£| 

« S" 
s a ^^ 
o «^ 

S I 2 

^ CS > 

■< t"8 

60 cs 

• O 






CS 

g 



CS o> 

o 
B ® 
•- 60 



.213 

cs 

E 

01 
tS-B 

2§ 



s ft ft 



SI 

3" 13 

o i_ 



0) 

10 +J 
3 S 

cu 

9) a 

> B 

•FN 4, 

CO o 

? « 

i>.+J ft 

>- X 41 

g . . 



e-B 



© s 



cs B 
i- "" 
60 ^ 

£ * 

ft2 

cS 

•2J§ 

«3 

w 

3 to 

o> -m 
CS 

cj C 
.S oi 

« cS 
|g 

— cS 



bO 02 

C o3 

rfi 

0) 



03 

c 
f* 
o. 
ft 

03 



■X 



«2 5 ^ 



IB B C 
-.° ° 

2,2 « 

^»s"cs 
t- b *i 

fa £ 

g MM i. 

© • • COI 

oi cs 

60 



02 

o 
-fi 5 

-ij bo 

co c 

o 



? 03 
Oi 

a o 

O bo 

fi 

t~3 02 
I -fi 

Cfi ft 

eu e 

SP§ 

|s 

5 s« 

«S 03 

J s 

bo 

c S 
fen cti < 

S fi ^ 



© bo 



.S?a 



CD S-i 

ijS 



^^ 



as s 

CU 

fe 02 



=3 m .2 
03 ^ '£ 



03 2 
fi .S 



cp 

CD rt 02 

4= £ CU 
+* *■< •£ 

o ^ c3 

Oih Sh 

too 
o o ^ 

■*; on 

S 4B bC 

s * 

+-> M 3 
G u bo 
* 44 C 



o 

43 
CU 

bo 

bo 
fl 

03 



03 



S "-" 03 

2 2 S 
2 c^ 

ft-" 1 00 
CO CO 

<J cu . 
Q B fi 

» 2<2 

!h boZ 

W fi-O 

5 "3 



I- «- • h 

3«|* 

S^^-B 
O" © S 

5.S * B 
■BO* 
J5 **+» 

^^CS 



C^] 

73 
B 

03 . 
02 

2 O 

o o 
2 -« 

43 cj 

CJ 02 

M 43 
43 bo 



: >> £ cs 
"2 S £ 

l58H« ■- 

I 02 © S 01 
i •"" u 

i «w cfl_ S 

o 2 S 

: * a S m 

i S. g |S 

i O^-CS 

| £ * ^ « 

■ M <H|J!.S 



0> 

Oi &0 

U CS 

S 3 
4) 60 

S c 

X 

B 
^ 50 
cs '** 

Oi 0> 

^5 

CN*** 

CS 

CS („ 

"0° 

o> ■- 

H d 

TO cj> 

3 t" 

2 IS « 



02 * 
2 h 

-6 o 



fi.2 
"- 1 s 

cu ^ 

CO cu 
3 -J3 

bo S- 

G 03 

.a p, 

CU CU 
43 02 



4) lO - . m 

c^-S ft 

0) TH 

(— I 41 O 

J . MB 

■£ to cs 

41 3 02 
41 g W)o 

CS S CSjf 

&& a 

» 4< C 

*- ■ 60 4, 

^S cs b h 

41 © CS 

Si £73 

h co K ti 

^g^ 



+zM 



© . 

M B _ 

33 4 

S£> 

ssj: 

4> *- 



eS 



S.S 



CS 



w— g 

3 o 

3 co ■ - 

oi fi S 

o> 
fi 

a 






5 

UJ 

H 

UJ 

1^ 



(fl 
C w 

c E 
E 2 

2 2 

Q.CL 



■v» r 

J5 •» 

O 

o > 

ft" c 

• as 

~ "o 

O ° 

< o 

s z 



fi 2 

O 43 



03 


o 


3 




73 


>, 


a 


cu 


cu 


> 



73 .^ 

fi CJ 
03 "3 

„ fl 

02 03 

o 

+3 O 
cS K 

S 03 



fl "*- -w 
03 ° u 



<Ti 



is 

3 



43 cu 

o3 03 



Im 43 



03 

fl T3 
O CU 



O) fl 

CJ CO 

?> s 

cu m 






42 02 



.fi 03 

■s -fi 

ft 

y 03 

fi .s 



02 
03 5 

u 5? 

bo 
o ^3 



bo 

G 

w 

43 

a 

03 

bo 

o 
cu 
bo 



bo S 
O O 






q3 -r 1 



bo 



■— ' •—< co 



02 y 
cu O 

CJ 

fl 43 
CO 



03 
bo 



t 3 !h 



02 O 
03^ 

■fi s 

.5? 8 

" bo 

cu o 

43 &h 

■+« ft 



o 



T3 S 

fl ^ 



© ^ 

IS 



•"2 

O 03 



-^ S ^ 

« S 4$ 

03 -3 C) 



cu 

fi 5 



CJ -3 
1T2 CU 



fi U 
CU o 

g«H 

> s 

2 42 
ft^ 3 

1 1 



=*H 

So 

Q2 2 
■fl5 



►si 

^ fi S 

ft § § 

o ft ~. 

CJ cu ^ 

02 h &H 

CU 03 

fi c «3 

^ S si 



^j 02 
fl ^ 
CU jS 

I- 

S ft 
ft " 

cu £ 

Q 
cu 

2 9 

iS ft 
CO 4 

02 =0 
5« 

£* 

C£> ^' 

CO C75 
(J5 CO 



M CO 

-1 

O 03 
-t-> 

Oi cu 

•■h 03 

■3 +J 

U Ul 

O 

O 02 

O 43 

§ s 

^ fi 

02 O 



02 4-J 

-3 -i-J 
G ^ 



oj 



to 



02 CU i-h 

^H_2 

1 s s 

o "« P 
^ S£ 
0) 3 "" 

^ s n O 

bo co 
co g Z^ 

Oi -H Oi 

' Oi 



Oi CO 



OJ 



^ .5 



o 

hh CO 

w . 

Q o 
^co 

cu 

02 rj 

43 5 



• fi 43 

03 -3 
U ^ 
CD 

ft -o 
O 02 

o 

CJ 



CU 

CO - 
— < -l-> 

^ fi 

03 



2 °° 

fi to 

G Oi 

O <-H 



.35 +* 73 



rrt -3 

+J T3 
03 T3 
ft 03 



02 w 

G 

* as 

t>0 5^ 

CU.P 
43 < 



^° 

!h O «*H 
03 « o 



-,3 CJ 

0) 44 

3 43 

02 3 

.2 Ph 



02 02 
Cfi 43 

03 g 

g> cu 
O «2 

>l 
H 2 

02 ?h 

3 



0) 
73 

CJ 
4h 

C cu 
— ' 43 

LC *• 
00 G 
O ,,H 

00 ^ 

i> 

^73 

CO G 

, CM o3 

left 

hH 

<H hH 
O t-H 

^^ CO 
03 CU 

oS 

- cu 
co ^ 

P G 

O 3 



00 73 

o co 

«, c CO 



'45 



Ih 6^- 



O 

"sf G 73 

^ S 03 

CO 

CM 73 co 

CS G 73 



o3 G 
3 



02 -3 

« 2 it 

S -3- o 

O G 

CO ft 5 
Sh X fi 



r G 

- CU ^H 

3 fi 03 

1 >H L, 



3 35 

3h CU 
02 hH 

m c 

° 2 
.2 ^ 

'+J CO 

'3 1 
■a w 

ceo 

5_ OS 

-3d 



CU 4S 

43 o 

21 

O Jh 

fe o 

^ <4H 

CO ^ 

^> 02 

CO >> 



- bo 

^ s 

cu '> 



G „ O 

o3 2 "U 

Sh 5 s 03 

bo PO 



-^ S©» CO 

fi "2 

cu I G 

fthH 3 
CO hH «H 



X 03 



^33 



cfl 



cu 



73 43 

CO +J 

^3 , 

• rt =+H 

> o 

273 

ft fl 

0) 
CJ cu 

<35 



bo 3 



b o> "P 



o fl P 
«H o3 _o3 

bo _ 

4J O fi 

» a c 

Sh ft G 

Cfl J 

CU 

co 43 fi 

+J -H> O 

2 o 

° fl C3 
•^ O C 

§'■§ - 

33 G 
p cu 

3 S 

U 73 03 
ft 02 

■fi s ^ 

4-1 .a 

%-i 0) 

O co 43 
^43- 

CO 

0) !h 73 
73 O fi 

fi 02 

G hH 

2 -iS H 

03 75 

+» O "-" 

AH 

CO p< 

S O co 



o .fi 

33 h< 
03 ft 



73 
G 



43 

cH co 

. 43 
CO 
CO .J3 
Oi 

rH 73 
03 

^■fi 
>a CO 






.7) 



CO 

CO 

cs 

1—1 

73 

c 

03 

co 

CO 



co cm 

> CO 

5 os 



.2 o 

43 -Q 
G ^ 

•rt cu 



43 
CO CS 
-fi .73 
EH 03 

> 

o3 



° «5 

03 03 CO 
ft73 

cu co G 
43 !h ^ 
+j ft ft 



5 d ^ 
fl -h? co 

•a to os 

«5o" 

73 3°° 
02 -h> CD 

"S OT s 

fi -h> 3 

CO G h-j 

p <v - 

H S2 



co 



O 

a hh 
a M 
c 



c ^-i 



CD 

► 43 
03 

CU^ 
43 C 

03 •" 
H 



03 73 
> CU 

P HH 



bo fi 

o .o 

flfi 



>>43 

^ .a 

43 > 
bo ^ 

33 co 
co CJ 
G 
bo o3 
G ^ 

'> O 
o3 cu 



S W 42 
42^- 

H^ 

02 03 

-fl 2 

-h> c 



3 

o 

" 43 
CO 
CO 
Sh "H< 

03 CO 

02 i 

>>§ 

o2 



CO 



03 



fi cu 

-f3 5h 

+» 3 

-H> 

"a 33 

O 73 
C 

a^ft 

-tJ cu 

cu 

cj bo 
2h3 

cu ou 

43 > 



hi 42 
O CO 
<M !h 



Sh 
03 +j 
CO 

>l"H 

o 

■S fi 

CO o 
+j 33 
co 73 

cS fi 

CD CM 

43 i-H 
+a 09- 

bO >, 

.S "3 



73 .a 

cu 

■3 -c 

C 01 

02 • — 

ft s- 1 

X ^ 

02 > 

sl 

CO 

03 ft 
G X 

• r-, CD 



C o3 
CD 

_5 *C0 

03 02 

03 

co ^ 

4 4^ 

CO 

Oi 02 

rH 43 



O J— 



co ^ 

& 2 

o a 

co o3 



U 3 

O 

CO 



« fi 

CD o 

73 '-^ 

03 oj 

^ c3 

CO ft 

< ° 

a 



o .2 

"o3 3 

02S 

fi s©- 

CO 
CO 3 



cu 
43 

^^ 

. G 

73 CO 

2 S 

h. G 

ft 2 
ft £ 

c3 oj 

02 >, 

CJ HJ CO 

02 _ -H> 

■r-5 G >g 

2-2 § 

rti N °3 

CO -rH Q 

43 a O 

-fi b». 

<H -H p 

O 3 43 

68 3 

02 73 3 
O CD " 3 

° 2 « 

03 o 

<+H CU .3T 
° c^.2 

« e« 

* 43 a 
£ -Hi 73 

•rH CO 

■fi a k 

8-8 8 

CD S 
CD Cfl CJ 
43 CO C 



03 .2 

O o' 

H 

43 i 



03 oi 

C 



o 

a. 

CD 

h T3 

0- £ 

5 g 
>>■ 

43 .3 

73 
CD nj 
Ih p 
CD 
> CC 

a 

c 

73 3 

.2 „ 

%> 
a - 

^ cS 

°3 , 

02 K 

CO ,§ 
CD CS 

43 

-H> 

bo c 

G 'B 

3 _ 



s! 



; ;K 






CD O 

cr> CO 
CO t- 





.a 





BfcJ 


+j 


li 


Jnw 


_g 


Q 

z 

w 


i •"'. 


■o 


0. 


.■; ' 


CS 


w 








, u i 


S 

o 


a 

Ed 
H 


-ai 


-M 


H 


' s i 


o 

s 


O 




+J 




09 

c 


1 






1 


><jj 


«4— 1 

o 


co 
Q 
Z 


j; " 




& 

fa. 


fflfi 


*H 


j 


|Sj- 


CS 


OS 


T : L 


CS 


w 


;" 'j 


O 


Q 

tu- 
fa. 


■i- 


4) 


1 


; C 


to 




*«J 


3 






73 
cu 

CO 


H 
J 

CO 




83 


<! 


" k: 


CU 


H 


i 


lH 






u 




■?.>,' 


c 





i-l t- i-i -«9« ,_( GO 

rtten^. ,_, to 

Ift Cft 00 t- f2 ^H 



© © © © cTi m 



OrtOfC ^ 

t-H © lH © on 

t-* as co © a? 

(ON©© t, 

CTS © GO GO lA 



OOAOHNnTf 

m »ft co co co co co 

A A A 9) © © © 



3 


SH 

n 


to 

CO 


< 




^H 


CD 


w 


J. 

3 


-fcJ 

s 
<1) 


73 
3 


Q 


o 


CJ 
Sh 

1> 


03 


-3 


« 


ft 


to 


-fcj 


35 


o 


be 


Sh 
0) 




1-1 


3 
bo 
3 


73 


D 


Sh 
(1) 


3 

3 


iS 


> 


03 


CO 



si ^ 

ft * 






02 






CO 



'IfcO 



" Si • 

. O Ifl 



s "f 
- to 



3J 

s i 3 

fl" 

In 



" * « 

aft* 

HI 

t. « 'J 

u $ '' 
Jhfl" 



s 

<u ~ ., 
■ w CP Cj 

"1 « 
Sh g - 

^ =2 2 

a ^ 

&H CD 
CP y 
ft Si CD 

ITS ft-O 

t> 3 

CM co 

1 H * 

ll-s 

S 3 ,, 



3 
C 

a) 

0) 
3 

3 

o3 



5 .3 



3 *" 

o.2 

bO E> 

§Q 
bo 

3 <" 
03 -3 



i. (- 
a s 



« S 

u o 



V 3 

co a 
I 

a 

H 
O 

z 



3 Si 

o <y 

.S -a 
£ 3 

co 3 
O 
ft co 

r 1 cd 

3 K-i 

03 



§ s 



3 

n *i 

5 3 « 

Si o 
o si o 



S-i 03 
CD O 

ft VJj 
CO Si 

CJ 

0) 
3 cD 



W ° -3 



T3 u 

3 o3 

03 «M 

3 "O 

O OJ 

•S > 

3 £ 

03 ft 



2 aj 



ft 

X 
CD 

<D *S 
^5 



3 

cd cD Pi 
73 73 

O -r 1 e *n 

S co ° 

— *i -^ 

'S ft 3 

3 CD 

03 CD B 

- ^ -t- 3 

CO ™ Si 



s ^ 



S~73 
o3 CD 

CD "ft 



3 co 
CD 

-3 



03 
eg » 

Jo 



A ^L — ' 

3 ,3 cd 



3 .3 



o .S 



; l-H 03 



- 3 
co CD 
CJ CD 
•J3 Si 

CD 

ft 



CD 



CD *0 
03 03 2 

B 5:5 



CD O 

CD Sh 

CO ft 

ai .- 

X! CO 



S w 



•g s 

•2 g 

03 TH 

3 g 






> CJ 

si "d 

CD > 
Q, Si 

w CQ o3 



03 3 

4-2 a> 
GO 

^< co 

<3 o3 

p 

I? co 

CD .y 

-M o3 

«H S 

O CD 

3 -=1 
S 






m .3 



co 



03 
Sh 
bo 

o 

Si 

ft > 



s 

3 

e g-2 



CD o3 
42 > 3 
r< CD O 
CO CD T "Jj f? 









a 








e 




H 




n 




0) 




M 




a 


- 


a 


a 


e 


w 


a 


e 


j 


kJ 




T3 


Sb 


C 






CO 


to 


>>s 






•a 




fc. 


v E 




•v S 




cj: 


'/; 


Of 4^ 


w 


ft" 






H 


w 






Q 
Z 


C 

3 



W 


< s 


a. 


w 


V 




CQ 


J 




<; 




H 




o 




H 


*i £ 


1 


o a 






^ 


e'o 




Z B 


W 


b 


-1 

CO 


c 


<1 




H 


JS a 




■a a 




c — 




!=a 








03 




& 
























b^ 



CD rt© ^J" M Oi 

m m m co co co 

CM M t*. t- M W 

^Tio Tt« oo^jT© 

CO l> © GO rj> CO 
©QOCfi^lAN 
CO CO CO CO ift TP 



HCOHArt^ 1 
CN ^ ^f CJ t, CO 

cn i— i »rt t* go "* 
m •*# co ai t>T i-c 

tN CC ■*)" Tf 00 ^ 



N w ^« © ic i-H 

OS © © ca © © 
Oi ^ CO CO irt CO 



oi © CO N © co 
•41 © 1-^ N © ■* 

t," CO* ^* CO CO «* 

irt fc- *H CO © © 

^p © lo co ic cj 

to* »ft CO © ©" CO 

Oj © t-" © i-H ^ 

^< © co co e\j i> 
CsJ ci of W T9.* M 



© ** *z ^ ^ZC 

w 3 s S "*^ 

irt *-< o w w t^ 

^ OJ CN CM CO* N 



a 03 g 

si (72 to 

3 3 

CD l-H 



3 73 

a cs 

CD 

ft 8 • 

a S< 

•a « h 

CD O Q 
-=! ^5 



Cl © t-H PJ CO -P 

■A W V CD CO 

Jv en en en en en 



3 
<B -2 



^ CD 

Sh CJ 

CD _C a 

CO 53 £ 

CD £ 

X » to 

■p j! a 

CJ .5 
3 T3 

S s § 

•rt +j 03 

■H Oj 3 

CO 5- CO 

a s > 

^3.2 

^ cd 
CO o> ™ 

"> b 3 

E_j H^H 'i-H 

ft - •?, 



73 bo 

73 -rl 

3 73 
CD o3 

a g 

03 

73 
co a 
$ 03 

3.2 

£ % 

Ph 3 

W 
CD 

03 >> 

t/J ft 
o3 



-Sex 



o. O 

CD *» 

p3 +p 



O 



Si CO HJ 



03 "" 
it co 

73 S 

CD .3 

W o3 

CD .2 



3 "O 

3 

C3 



bo 

o 

CD 
60 
..- ° ft 

3 +3 TS 

c S 

CD 03 



S bo 

bo 3 

si 

b« CD 

„ Sh 
CO 

.2 -a 

> 3 

•3 * 

3 ^ 

■2w 



3 t 

3 3 

If 9 



CD 



^-,3 

CD 
> 

O 
CD 



2 a 



CO 



-If 



»o-i 



O T3 

CO 1) 
co 

CD o3 

3 C" 

3 *■■ 
1-8 



Sh 
O 

I g 

■ " Si 
>> ^ 

5 a 



g > 

o '5 
§ 73 

. ^ 
co "3 

cj O 
•t-i +j 
> 

si to 

CD CO 
CO OJ 
l-H 
CO 

Si 03 
CD 3 
■+ J ci 

S 03 
1-5 



■S a 



X! cj 
3 Si 
CD 03 
CD 

03 cu 

^ h 
CO o3 
"^ . 

-^ a 

i3 S 

P 03 
bO cd 

•S-S 

ft^ 

CD o 



co c 

o .a 
a 

CO 

>> 3 

S-2 



3 >> 

CO fn 

O 

CD CO 



Eh 
O 
W 

« 

co 

PS 

coS 

a; 

0- CO 

jjen 

Z H 

£«? 

Wen 

H HO 
P3 Hfc 

H 3 = 



W 



or 

HH 
^„ 

s« 

rj W 

«s 

HZ 
B-E3 

Q 
Z 

H 

z 

iO 
O 

S 



c© ua 
t- en 
ce w 



t- cd en en -* w 
-* co co co eo CD 
en « en ^j. eo o 

Ji^. wii-00 

I" M-H-rt 



.a S 

g E s 

c J 8 S 

CJ *j ^ .- 
*>- al n E» 



k. ftjs ** 
5 h^s 



■3 ■§ ~ -5 o 9 g 

i_- iji .m ■■* a* m v 

SSoKowas 






















«# 






© 

.2 

3 

£ 
[A 

© 




co 


© 




O 







Z 


be 




& 






fa. 


a* 




O 


|4 




z 

3 






CJ 






H 






<! 


H 




S 




co 






t- 


HH 




Tjc 


< 




IA 


CJ 






O 




CM 


J 




en 






eo 


fc. 




«jv 


O 

co 
fa] 

CJ 

BS 

O 
co 

1 
i> 

B 
J 

a 

H 


c 
s 
fa 




^^ 




en 


a 




w 






CJ 







hi 


H 




3 
© 
CO 



I- 



Ms 

cj **- en 
e 3 

O B 



B e 



g -m - 

p. 5 £ b i 

M a no 

* **- « ^ eu 
■g X s^ 

E a s 15 

3 © © iy 

CJZO Eh 



1,3 h3 



3 

CD ^h 
3 o3 

S u 
ft o 

'3 ^ 
=Ti3 



••> co 73 
cu CD H 

3 -3 CD 
bO ft -^ 
G "eS *S 

fits? 



CO CO 

Sh Sh 

O CD 

4-i H-J 

y b 



o 

Sh 

ft >> 



73 
3 
cS . 

CO 

CS 



CJ CO 



CD 



03 



c° c 

CO ^ 

Sh 



CD 



73 
03 
co -^ CD 



CD 



«H 



cu 3 
ft— 1 
.P to 

to 

co o3 
3 •+-' 
O m 

'B >> 

> 3 



3 ^& 

o '43 .- 

3 3 co 
'i CD CD 



si S 



I'g 



CJ CO 
CD 

■j-, CD 

P bo 

ft S 



Sh CJ 



CO "j 



g 03 03 

Cj t^ r. 

.2.2 En 



cj O 

3 - ,J 

§ g 

03 o 

ft Sh 

CO ft 
3 

„ 5 0> 

JS 'Z 73 



bo 



73 
CD 
73 



a cd 



r- Si 

53 <D 

- a 

• - 3 



CD 



to 



03 

> 

■".2 
-»-> 03 



> ft 

O 3 
Si co 
ft 

CD 
CD -3 

> +» 

^^ 

CO 

73 73 
3 CU 

3 CO 
«H 3 

Q ^3 

^^ 

a 



ft 03 CD 

73 a 3 

° CP ch 

ft 03 f 3 

i- a s 



h e^ 



o3 



bo ^ 3 

.5 co 

"2 ^^ 
2 'si p 

.S & CO 

- ft o 

ill 

ta cj _, 
^ ® a 

CD ft 3 

ft co o3 



.3 3 

r^ 03 

1-2 

.si 

73 to 
CD Sh 
co CP 
3 73 
Sh 
cS 

Sh 
CD 

S CD 
03 o, 

u 53 

bo"!. 

3 co 

Si CD 

43 a 

a 03 

CD cj 



cj 



. bo 

to 3 
a 03 

cfl 3 

bO 'S 

3 Sh 

.Jh O 

o3 3 

Sh !h 

73 CD 

73 

73 O 

c a 

03 w 
bO 3 

.a ^ 

03 cS 
Sh 3 
-tJ CO 

-'> 
co o 
co .3 
CD 73 
Si 3 

73 

CU 



5 c2^^ 



.2 a • 
"> « 
1- 

— 1 CD ' 

O «M 

5 c 

JS o 

O CJ' 

to 

o> c 2 

3 ctj 

— © o 

js <*- 

its co a 

g CD 
fc- ^^ 

S c ° 

to 73 
T ic fi 

5.2 
a h 
a * 

25 

73 g cv 
CD 

v 5 
g rt c 
bo ao gj- 
3"0 cj 
cfl_OTS 



■S -2 « « co 

« r#) !« S Ct) • - 

'0.2 gt S.6: 

>i C 3 tJ +^ 
Q. m C «S CJ 



Cw « 

O. CD t- 

*^ "3 -n 

C cd « co 

o g a 

CJ 



g « 

« .2 E S -S "o a 

cs-g ft.© g „ 

* n fe 3 O 

•a a a 5 e 
a 3 •— cu S 
•3 &JS 1- — '*" 
3 cu to a ca 

ET h 3 bo 

4) >h CU Sh 5 g 

O 73 CU.S .5 

cdX >• - 



tXc 

a cu o cu 

• - co -1 CS a JS 

S.g to CS M 

<S cS CU © a 

> o -w y , 

CUy- -H t; tO 

•-- 2 s- . e 

73 cj a cu bo a 

a « a g S 2 

cs ag g-- j- 

co © r 5 bo 

so « fe-2 © 

ft-O CO CD l> 



H 
CJ 

w 

l-S 

ca 


CO 

<l 

fa! 

Q 

z 

Z=? 



Hen 
CO-h 

go 
*l 

^ US 

z . 

Wco 

^5 

Z 



5-*N'i.COt-fcO© 
! CO CO 1> trt CM -H M 

jHCOODOhUS) 



o©ooo©©© 

CoQOcJO-HCDt-eO,-! 

^.CNt-cDifteroOoo 

^.COt'CiWoCNH 



fc. 1 -* 1 - 1 



3 s ii"^.:," 



^J= 



w»»©BBBaE 

s m o 2 « S « a 
cu — ; ■ - ja j- fc.aa 
cj<!ffl cjcMCiCOco 



^ r^ 73 
-fcJ CD CD 

03 3 +J 

CD 03 

H <H 1 

bo O 3 

bo sfi 
3 3+3 

»2 to 
cp ~ 



S 73 



CD 



n O 
S M 

II 

c 
.2 03 

° a 

"■ o 

_ o 



co 



Si CO 

* M 

03 E 



a 1 

73 S3 cy 
43<fc-' E 

•C P 
o to w 

h Sch 

a © © 

cu £ 2 
«43 - 43 
2 2 ca 

cu ® — 

OJ g-O 

0> 3 

73 a 



a « 



S X^ si g 



co^: 
cu-5 



cu cu 
to g 



e P a 

to 5 »-.s — •£ 
s 5 a «, rt S 
•S to _ cj.s a 
> £sfix 
nhhS S -a cu 

CO P o5 CU 

cu-S t -"5* J .S 
.fc 8 o 2 •« 

« § "2 -£ a 

s&2sg| 

S * a.2 be-2 

a t» © -w © co 

© cu © cs U to 

cj x) cj n a CS 



bo 

3 

• I— I 
+3 - 



CD 
CJ 

S 

CD 
»ph 
CJ 

cX 



-« 03 
CD OJ 

5 CJ0 

"2 c 

3 CD 
cS cu 

co^ 

.2 to 

-*_> 03 
— h3 

§5 

«H ^S 

CD § 

° <+H 

3 

CD H 

o 2 

CO CD 
O CD 

bo 3 
3 O . 

ft G I 

ft c 73 

•1 C J) 

£ P ^ 

01<H „ 
CJ 

2 a. c 

CJ -rH 

cS 

ft^ 
ro 3 
^^ 

Sh 

o 



is 

J= o 

CJ 

% 

cj5 «C 



s c 



g ■» w"43 



^3 
3 
03 

73 

CD 

§2 
II 



a 1- o 

--c2«» 

CJ t" 

1-1 cj 

«H «j cj 
O to .JH 

bOe^ © 

.S«ts 

III 

cS 



s S 

cj S3 

£•2 

.5* c« 
3 w 

CU CJ 
CU 

' a 

CO £0 

3 

•- 1 5 

CS CS 

«^ 

CS 
^.73 

S c 

I* 

CO Cfl 



_5 J5 






CD 

CJ 

a 


J3 

CS 




to 


CJ 


cu 


V) 






be 


!*J 


a 


© 


'43 




Cu 


CD 


Cu 


to 

CS 


£ 


43 

CJ 


to 




m 


3 




c- 


Sh 

CU 




*H 




cd 




£ 



Retiring Staffers Served 106 Years 

Four veteran staffers in the State Department of 
Public Instruction retired on June 30 with a total of 
106 years of service. Two, R. J. Peeler and Charles 
E. Spencer, have served the Department for 28 years ; 
Mrs. Mabel Hall has been with the Department 26 
years ; and Charles L. Haney saw 24 years of service. 
All four were honored at a reception in the Library 
of the Education Building on their last day at work. 

Peeler, as State supervisor in youth work for the 
Department's Division of Vocational Education, be- 
came the first full-time executive secretary of the 
N. C. Association of Future Farmers of America. 
That organization, at its 38th annual convention 
last spring, voted to rename the FFA camp at White 
Lake the R. J. Peeler FFA Camp. Prior to joining 
the Department, he had taught vocational agriculture 
for 12 years. 

A native of Rowan County, he went immediately 
into this work upon graduation from N. C. State. He 
has seen the FFA movement progress from several 
hundred members to over 30,000 members in this 
State. Sidney Sauls of Benson, State FFA president, 
said "more than any other person, he is responsible 
for our high ranking in national and international 
young farmer programs." 

Few Teachers 

Spencer, a native of Virginia, was State supervisor 
of School Health and Physical Education and director 
of the School Health Coordinating Service. When he 
joined the Department in 1938 there were only 
14 full-time certified health and physical education 
teachers in the State. A system unique to North 
Carolina, cooperative effort between Public Instruc- 
tion and the State Board of Health, was developed in 
1940. It works to diagnose and correct any chronic, 
remedial defect that hampers a child's learning. 
Spencer explained it is actually a four-way operation 
that local boards of education and health departments 
share with the two State departments. 

Spencer began working in the Reidsville schools 
in health and physical education after graduating 
from the University of North Carolina. He took his 
master's degree from Columbia University and studied 
toward a Ph.D. degree under a Rockefeller Foundation 
scholarship at UNC's School of Public Health. He 
worked at one time as YMCA physical education 
director in High Point. With the Department he 
worked with public school grades one through 12 and — 
on an unofficial consultant basis — worked with colleges 
because "after all," he said, "they train teachers." 

Mrs. Hall came from her native Tennessee to the 
Greenville schools as a supervising teacher of pro- 
spective teachers enrolled at East Carolina College. 
That was in 1938 and in 1940 she joined the State 
Department in Home Economics Education with 
offices on the campus of ECC. From there she super- 
vised in schools of the 22 eastern counties of the State 
and acted as liaison with the college and the Depart- 
ment. She traveled from 700 to 1,000 miles monthly 
in her work for the State and, in addition, served as 
an associate professor of home economics at ECC. 



Introducing . . . 

Continued from page 7 
Dr. Paul W. Welliver > counselor in science, is a 
former television instructor of science. He is a gradu- 
ate of Western Maryland College and holds M.Ed, and 
Ph.D. degrees from Pennsylvania State University. 
He has taught in Maryland, Pennsylvania and at the 
Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies. 

Rosalyn K. White is a School Lunch supervisor 
and comes from the Baldwin Park Unified School Dis- 
trict in California where she served as District Food 
Supervisor. She has been a cafeteria manager, owned 
and operated her own restaurant, and served as 
Director of Cafeteria Services, Western Michigan Uni- 
versity in Kalamazoo, Mich. Her B.S. degree is in 
Home Economics from Western Michigan University, 
her M.S. degree is in Nutritian from Texas Womens 
University, and her A.D.A. degree is in Dietition 
Administration from Washington University. 

Numerous changes have been made in the district 
and facility offices of the Division of Vocational Re- 
habilitation. By August 1 three new staffers had 
been added to the State office in Raleigh. Claude A. 
Myer is Assistant Director of Program Development, 
a new position. He came here from the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation, Government of Guam, 
where he was Chief. He holds the B.A. degree in 
Education and the M.R. in Rehabilitation Counciling 
from the University of Florida. 

R. G. Harrison has been named supervisor of Special 
Services, and he comes to the State office from the 
Durham district office which he has headed since 1963. 
He previously counseled at Greenville. His A.B. degree 
was taken at Eastern Carolina College. 

Larry W. Holland is supervisor of Social Security 
Trust Fund Services and has previously counseled in 
the Charlotte and Salisbury district offices. He holds 
the B.A. degree from Guilford College. 

She is now with her husband, J. Roscoe Hall, who 
is head of the Science Department in the Bristol Public 
Schools. Her B.A. degree was taken at Milligan Col- 
lege, her B.S. in Home Economics is from East State 
University of Tennessee, and her M.S. is from the 
University of Tennessee. 

Haney served as supervisor of Professional Services 
for the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. He is a 
native of McDowell County and returned there to 
teach after receiving his degree at the University of 
North Carolina. He left the schoolroom to become 
educational advisor of the Civilian Conservation Corps 
and later served as supervisor of training with 
the National Youth Administration. In 1942 he 
joined the department's Vocational Rehabilitation 
staff as a counselor in Asheville. He later transferred 
to Durham and then was promoted to the State office 
in Raleigh. 

Following his retirement with the Department, he 
became the first executive director of the North Caro- 
lina Rehabilitation Association. The association head- 
quarters are in Raleigh, and he and Mrs. Haney have 
moved into a new home on Ocotea Road. 



10 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Rutherford Summer Program Cited 

Among the 1966 summer programs in North Caro- 
lina for public school students, the one in Ruther- 
ford County included many features which may well 
become characteristic of summer programs in the 
future, according to Max Padgett, program director. 

The program, seven weeks in duration, was financed 
through funds from the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act. More than 2,400 students, K-ll, were 
enrolled and the average daily attendance was approxi- 
mately 90 percent. A total of 125 classroom teachers 
were involved, as well as 50 teacher aides, 12 li- 
brarians, 12 principals, 10 physical education teachers, 
5 activity bus drivers, 44 other bus drivers, and three 
specialists in each of the following areas: music, 
speech, supervision, and counseling. 

Twelve Centers 

Throughout the 12 centers in which the summer 
program operated emphasis was placed on communi- 
cation skills, each teacher being encouraged to work 
with as much freedom, ingenuity, and creativity as 
possible. Instructional aids, according to Padgett, 
were available in liberal quantities for pupils at all 
grade levels and for all achievement levels. Funds 
were also available for physical examinations for all 
summer school participants, for soap and towels, and 
for numerous field trips. 

Prior to the beginning of the seven-week summer 
session, a one-week in-service workshop was held for 
all teachers, librarians, principals, and others who 
might be responsible for any portion of the summer 
project. The theme of this workshop, "That All May 
Learn," was emphasized through visiting consultants, 
small group meetings, use of new materials in the 
professional libraries, and through individual and 
group planning. 

In evaluating this in-service workshop, almost all 
participants indicated that it was either good or very 
good. Participants were especially pleased that time 
was available for planning the teacher-learning experi- 
ences for the summer. 

Midway the summer program a one-day, in-service 
seminar was held in an effort to appraise accomplish- 
ments and plan for final activities. 

Values of Program 

In commenting on the results of the program, Co- 
ordinator Padget and Superintendent Forrest Hunt 
stressed the values and satisfaction in: 

• availability of funds for such a comprehensive 
program 

• excellent cooperation of students, parents, and 
other community personnel 

• dynamic dedication of all professional personnel, 
including doctors and nurses, who assisted with the 
program 

• freedom which teachers used wisely in working 
with individual students 

• the rather complete physical examinations for all 
summer school students and the numerous corrections 
which were made or initiated 

• numerous field trips, especially for younger chil- 



Dingman Named to Association Post 

Dr. Raleigh E. Dingman of High Point has been 
named the first full-time executive secretary of the 
North Carolina State School Boards Association which 
has headquarters in Chapel Hill. His appointment was 
announced on June 30 by John Entwistle, president of 
the association. 

Since 1960, Dr. Dingman has been principal of 
Northeast Junior High School in High Point which 
has an enrollment of around 1,200 pupils. He began 
his professional career in High Point in 1950 as a 
high school science teacher and athletic coach. From 
1952 to 1960 he was principal of Tomlinson Ele- 
mentary School. 

He received his doctorate degree in education from 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He 
holds the bachelor of arts degree from the American 
International College in Springfield, Mass., and the 
masters degree from Ohio State University. 

Dr. Dingman has been active in state, regional, and 
national professional organizations. During his 16 
years in High Point, he served the Methodist Church 
as a member of the Board of Stewards and Sunday 
School Superintendent and teacher. He is a past presi- 
dent of the Junior Chamber of Commerce and of the 
Kiwanis Club. In 1955 he was named High Point's 
"Man of the Year." 

Continuing Education Center Planned 

North Carolina State University officials have an- 
nounced plans for a $5.8 million Continuing Education 
Center to be built with funds from the N. C. Legis- 
lature, the federal government, private donations, 
and foundations. It will be designed as a center of 
"lifelong earning," aimed at helping Tar Heel adults 
keep current with today's knowledge explosion." 

Launching the drive for the center on July 27, 
Chancellor John T. Caldwell accepted the first gift, 
$100,000 from the North Carolina Organization of 
Home Demonstration Clubs. Dr. Caldwell said the 
center would present special short courses and con- 
ferences and would serve as administrative head- 
quarters for correspondence work, night classes, and 
other extension activities. It would contain 13 con- 
ference rooms, varying in capacity from 30 to 200 
students. There also would be two auditoriums. 

dren, and the bringing of visitors and consultants to 
the classroom 

• emphasis placed on elementary guidance 

• availability of two swimming pools for use by 
a limited number of students 

• positive reactions which teachers, pupils, parents, 
and community leaders expressed concerning this 
venture into pupil enrichment, fuller use of school 
facilities, and more extensive use of teacher compe- 
tencies 

"The only major regret relative to this compre- 
hensive summer program," according to Padget, "is 
the fact that, according to provisions of the ESEA, 
we could not offer these splendid opportunities to all 
the students of Rutherford County." 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



11 



Kelly's Dissertation Reviews Art Education 



I. Perry Kelly was awarded 
his Doctor of Education De- 
gree at George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers in Nash- 
ville, Tenn. on August 20. 
His master's degree is from 
the University of Florida 
and his previous educational 
experience, before joining 
the Department three years 
ago, has been in Florida. His 
dissertation is discussed be- 
low. 



High schools offering art in 
North Carolina increased from 42 
in 1944 to 173 in 1964, an increase 
of 28 percent, according to a com- 
prehensive investigation of "Art 
Education in North Carolina," re- 
cently completed by Dr. I. Perry 
Kelly, consultant in art for the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction. The greatest growth 
took place between 1962 and 1964, 
when the percentage climbed from 
11 to 28. On the other hand, the 
percentage of high school stu- 
dents pursuing art rose from two 
to four during these same years. 

Purposes of Kelly's study were 
to determine the nature and status 
of art education in the public 
schools of North Carolina, relate 
these data to authoritative criteria 
concerning art education, identify 
strengths and weaknesses in the 
current art education programs, 
and suggest implications for con- 
tinued growth and improvement in 
art education throughout the 
State. 

In pointing out strengths of the 
overall public school art effort, 
Kelly indicated that individual 
programs centered in populous 
areas of the State form an effective 
nucleus for development of a state- 
wide program of art instruction. 
He also emphasized recent progress 
and growth in art education 
through extended efforts at the 
State level. Through carefully 
documented statistics, Kelly also 
stressed the positive features of art 
education in the areas of adminis- 
trative, financial, and community 
support; availability of materials 
and facilities; preparation of 
teachers to teach art; use of the 



art specialist; and practices in art 
instruction. 

Similarly, Kelly indicated a 
number of suggestions for improv- 
ing the Statewide program of art 
education. Some of these follow: 

• better preparation of teachers to 
teach art 

• college and university level co- 
operative planning for art education 

• art programs in less populous and 
less affluent areas of the State 

• State provision for employment 
of art specialists and added art fa- 
cilities 

•cultivate understanding of the role 
of the visual arts in education 

• develop among administrators an 
awareness of the unique role of art 
instruction in the public schools 

• more adequate financial support 
for art instruction 

• improved communications be- 
tween the schools and the museums 
of the State 

• more equitable distribution and 
use of art materials for white and 
non-white teachers 

• workshops and extension courses 
in art education 

• better use of the art specialists 

• more specific State guidelines in 
art for elementary teachers 

• attracting more high school stu- 
dents into art with meaningful, se- 
quential instruction based on needs, 
interests, and aspirations of students 



Cincinnati School Head Gets 
Compact For Education Post 

The steering committee of the 
Interstate Compact for Education 
has appointed Wendell H. Pierce, 
executive director of the Education 
Commission of the States. Pierce 
has resigned as superintendent of 
the Cincinnati, Ohio schools to ac- 
cept the position. 

Governor John Chafee of Rhode 
Island, chairman of the steering 
committee, said more than half of 
the states had already joined at 
the time of the first meeting of 
the Education Commission of the 
States held in June at Chicago. 
Currently the headquarters of the 
organization is in Cincinnati. Plans 
are to eventually move it to Den- 
ver, Colorado. 

Former North Carolina Governor 
Terry Sanford was instrumental 
in developing the idea of an inter- 
state commission for education into 
working organization. 



EDUCATION WEEK 

"Education Adds Up" is the 
theme chosen for American 
Education Week, which will 
be celebrated in all 50 states 
and territories, November 6- 
12. As in past years, it is 
sponsored by the United 
States Office of Education, the 
National Congress of Teach- 
ers and Parents, the Ameri- 
can Legion and the National 
Education Association. 

Emphasis for each day in- 
clude: Education adds up. . . . 
To Human Dignity; To Ra- 
tional Thinking; To a Cre- 
ative Spirit; To Self-Reliance; 
To Economic Competence; To 
an Informed Citizenry; and, 
To Lifelong Opportunities. 



Open House Planned 

The School of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences at North Carolina 
State University will hold its 
annual Open House on Saturday, 
October 22. 

This will mark the eighth 
consecutive year that special in- 
vitations have been issued for 
promising high school seniors to 
visit the university campus in order 
to become better acquainted with 
its facilities, curricula and career 
opportunities in agriculture, fores- 
try and the life sciences. 

Dean H. Brooks James has an- 
nounced that other guests will 
again include principals, superin- 
tendents, guidance counselors, sci- 
ence teachers and teachers in the 
introductions to vocations pro- 
grams. 



On June 9 an explosion of un- 
determined origin did extensive 
damage to the Moyock Elementary 
School in upper Currituck County. 
No classes were being held in the 
building at the time. Superin- 
tendent S. H. Helton said the jani- 
tor suffered lacerations and bruises 
when struck by flying debris. Em- 
ployees of the county's mosquito 
control program were spraying un- 
der the building at the time. How- 
ever, officials said there were no 
explosive materials in the insecti- 
cide being used. 



12 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Goldboro's Year Long Project Reveals Sensory 
Experiences Assist First Graders in Reading 

By Dr. V. M. Mulhollond 

First-graders in Goldsboro, dur- 
ing the school year 1964-65, learned 
to read most effectively when con- 
siderable emphasis was given to 
sensory experiences, according to 
the findings of a research project 
in first-grade reading under the 
Cooperative Research Study, spon- 
sored by the U. S. Office of Edu- 
cation through the Goldsboro City 
Schools and the State Department 
of Public Instruction. 

All 28 first-grade classes in the 
Goldsboro schools, 751 children, 
participated. Of this number, 385 
were white, 366, Negro. Seven 
schools and 28 teachers were in- 
volved ; the average size of classes 
was 30; children were assigned 
to classes within schools in the 
same manner as in other years; in 
the data analysis there was no com- 
parison of one classroom with an- 
other, but rather comparisons of 
total treatment groups and special 
subpopulations ; and teachers with- 
in a school were allowed to choose 
the method of instruction they 
would use. 



Study's Purpose 

The major purpose of this study 
was to compare three approaches 
to teaching first-grade reading — a 
traditional basal reader approach, 
an approach using basal readers 
plus an intensive phonics approach, 
and an approach including the 
above mentioned methods plus sen- 
sory experiences. 

The "sensory experiences" ap- 
proach included to some degree 
the "basal reader" and "intensive 
phonics" programs; but, in ad- 
dition, emphasis was placed on sen- 
sory experiences. Teachers supple- 
mented their reading programs 
with many aural, oral, and visual 
aids and materials which appealed 
to the various senses. The reading 
program for the nine groups using 
the "sensory experiences" approach 
was further supplemented by the 
use of audiovisual materials and 
equipment — tape recordings, film- 
strips, movies, records, supple- 
mentary library books, and games. 

Prior to the 140-day experiment, 
a series of readiness tests and an 



I.Q. test were administered to all 
students ; and at the end of the 
project, sub-tests (word reading, 
paragraph meaning, vocabulary, 
spelling, word study skills) of the 
Stanford Achievement Test, Pri- 
mary I Level, Form X, were given. 

Most Beneficial 

The experiment indicated that if 
only the basal reader and phonics 
approaches were being considered, 
it would make no difference which 
approach was used with white 
children, but that Negro children 
would benefit more from the basal 
reader approach. If a choice was to 
be made among all three ap- 
proaches, the sensory approach 
appears most beneficial for all 
children. Likewise, there were no 
significant differences between the 
basal reader approach and the 
phonics approach for white boys, 
white girls, or the total white 
population ; whereas, there were 
significant differences between 
these two methods for Negro boys, 
Negro girls, and the total Negro 
population. These differences all 
favored the basal reader approach. 

In relation to the phonics ap- 
proach versus the sensory experi- 
ences approach, there were signifi- 
cant differences for white and 
Negro boys, white and Negro girls, 
and for the total white and Negro 
population. These differences all 
favored the sensory experiences ap- 
proach. 

The study clearly indicates, ac- 
cording to its director, that no 
approach to the teaching of reading 
will, of necessity, reach all children. 
It does indicate that the sensory 
experiences approach is more bene- 
ficial than either of the other two 
approaches. 

Elizabeth A. Bordeaux, psy- 
chologist for the Goldsboro schools, 
was director and coordinator; Dr. 
Annie Lee Jones, University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was 
consultant; Dr. Roy E. Summer- 
field and Dr. Kinnard White, UNC 
—Chapel Hill, and Dr. Guy Bond 
and Dr. Robert Dykstra, Univer- 
sity of Minnesota, also assisted. 



School Planning Head 
Cited By Architects 

Dr. J. L. Pierce, director of the 
Division of School Planning for 
the State Department of Public In- 
struction, has been awarded an 
honorary associate membership in 
the North Carolina Chapter of the 
American Institute of Architects. 

The award, presented in the 
form of a framed certificate, was 
made at the chapter's annual con- 
vention in Asheville in July. It was 
presented by the chapter president, 
Macon S. Smith of Raleigh, for Dr. 
Pierce's "outstanding public serv- 
ice rendered to his State in an 
area of endeavor closely related to 
the profession of architects" and 
cited his — 

Interest in improving educational 
opportunities for all people of his 
State; 

Dynamic leadership in working 
for improved educational organi- 
zation and administration within 
the State; 

Dedication to the cause of proper 
school planning and contributions 
and assistance to the communities 
of his State in determining their 
needs and requirements for public 
schools ; 

Efforts in improving appreci- 
ation of the need of, and his insist- 
ance upon, the best in architectural 
services in the design of school 
buildings; and 

Determination that the Division 
of School Planning be of service 
to the school units and architects 
which it serves. 



New 'Study Abroad' Edition 

As an aid to thousands of Ameri- 
can students who wish to study 
abroad, the Institute of Inter- 
national Education has published a 
new edition of Undergraduate 
Study Abroad which describes pro- 
grams sponsored by U. S. colleges 
and universities during the aca- 
demic year and the summer. The 
edition lists 208 groups, supervised 
or independent study programs for 
the academic year in various coun- 
tries, and 97 summer programs. 
Copies of the books are available 
for $2.75 from HE, 809 United 
Nations Plaza, New York, N. Y. 
10017. 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



13 



Two In-Service TV Courses Offered for 66-67 

Two in-service courses are being offered during the 1966-67 school 
year via television or film, according to Dr. James Valsame, supervisor 
of In-Service Education for the State Department of Public Instruction. 

A course in mathematics for elementary teachers, entitled "Learning 
the New Math," is produced by the National Council of Teachers of 
Mathematics. An English course, entitled '"English-Fact and Fancy," is 
a general education survey course appropriate for teachers at all levels. 
The mathematics course will be offered during the fall semester and the 
English course during the spring. 

Each course will carry one unit of non-college credit which can be 
applied toward second and subsequent renewal of Class A and higher 
certificates. Credit for the mathematics course will be appropriate for all 
teachers holding an elementary certificate or teaching at that level. 
Credit for the English course may be used by most teachers. 

Participating schools in areas not able to receive Channel 4 or 2 may 
secure the program on 16 mm film for presentation locally. Around 140 
coordinators for the math course in local schools and 110 for the English 
course attended a meeting in Raleigh with math and English specialists 
from the Department of Public Instruction on August 8-11 where they 
previewed the entire course on film and received suggestions for follow- 
up sessions. The 250 classes scheduled in that many schools will involve 
some 7,000 teachers during the year, Dr. Valsame said. 

John Cone Named Dean of Arts School 

John Cone of Scarsdale, New York, has been appointed Academic 
Dean of the North Carolina School of the Arts, replacing Mrs. Julia 
Mueller, professor of Duke University who served as acting Academic 
Dean last year. 

Cone is a native of Salem, Ohio. He received his A.B. and M.A. degrees 
from Rutgers University at Brunswick, N. J. and his Ph.D. degree from 
New York University. He also attended Kent State University in Ohio 
and the University of Southern California. He did graduate work in 
literature , art and music at the University of Florence in Italy. 

New students accepted at the school for the 1966-67 year totaled 130 
with 135 former students returning for a total enrollment of 265. One 
hundred and fifty-three of the students are from North Carolina, 108 
are from out-of-state, and four are from foreign countries. One hundred 
and forty-one are in music, 74 in dance, and 50 in drama. Eleven students 
are on the junior high school level; 124, high school; 128, college; and 
two are special students. There are 154 girls and 111 boys. 

Summer Theater Workshop Held for Teachers 

A unique workshop afforded 15 of this State's English and Drama 
teachers the opportunity of studying under professional theater personnel 
at the State Theater of North Carolina — the Flat Rock Playhouse. 

It was the second summer for the course, part of an In-Service Edu- 
cation Program of the Department of Public Instruction. The workshop 
was held June 20 through July 2 and carried two hours of non-college 
credit for certificate renewal. It was designed to better prepare teachers 
to direct and mount play productions in their own schools. 

The teachers saw the final rehearsals and first performance of the 
season opener, "Absence of a Cell." They then studied the entire working 
operation of the second production, "The Late Christopher Bean." They 
attended scheduled classes under the direction of Dr. Fergus G. Currie, 
assistant executive secretary of the Speech Association of America and 
a member of the faculty of Columbia University. Also assisting with 
class instruction were Miss Anita Grannis, state director at the Playhouse; 
Walter O'Rourke, technical director and designer; and Carl Williams, 
director of students in the Vagabond School of Drama which is con- 
nected with the Flat Rock Playhouse. 



School Planners Offer Help 
With Fallout Shelter Ideas 

Dr. J. L. Pierce, in cooperation 
with the Office of Civil Defense, 
has issued a reminder to school 
superintendents, school board mem- 
bers, and architects or engineers 
employed by the boards, that the 
Department of Public Instruction's 
Division of School Planning is 
available for consultations to those 
interested in providing a degree 
of fallout protection in any school 
facility. 

The division staff believes that 
decision as to the desirability of 
providing fallout shelter protection 
should be made as early as possible. 
The staff architects and engineers 
keep abreast of research and de- 
velopments relative to methods and 
techniques for providing atomic 
protection and are knowledgeable 
in the "slanting technique," a 
recent development aimed at pro- 
viding maximum protection at a 
minimum of additional cost. 

The State Civil Defense Agency 
can provide technical date and ad- 
vice regarding possible construction 
methods for providing fallout 
shelter protection. This agency, and 
most local civil defense offices, have 
available pertinent publications on 
the subject, including: 

"Schools and Civil Defense," by 
the National Commission on Safety 
Education; 

"Department of the Army TM 
64-2," Office of Civil Defense, DTD, 
November '65; 

"Incorporation of Shelter into 
Schools," OCD (PG-80-1) ; 

"National School Fallout Shelter 
Design Competition Winners, OCD 
Tech. Report TR-19 ; 

"Architectural, Engineering and 
Consulting Firms With Certified 
Fallout Shelter Analysts," OCD; 

"Shelter Design and Analysis," 
TR 20 (Vol. 1 and 2), OCD; and 

"Schools Built With Fallout Shel- 
ter," OCD TR-33. 



A bolt of lightening struck the 
general science, physics, and chem- 
istry departments of the J. T. 
Barber High School at New Bern 
during a violent thunderstorm on 
July 6. Damage was estimated at 
around $150,000 to one wing of 
the modern brick structure. 



T4 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Pacemaker Awards for Educational Improvement- 
Goes to North Carolina School of the Arts 



The North Carolina School of 
the Arts in Winston-Salem, the 
nation's first state-supported school 
for the performing arts, was 
honored on June 30 as a "pace- 
maker in educational improve- 
ment." 

The award was presented by the 
National Education Association and 
Parade, the Sunday newspaper 
magazine, at the NEA convention 
in Miami Beach, Fla. It was one 
of 44 Pacemaker awards for 1966 
presented to schools or school sys- 
tems in 42 states, the District of 
Columbia, and Puerto Rico. 
Grateful 

Dr. James H. Semans, chairman 
of the board of trustees, said in an 
interview, "we are especially grate- 
ful for this national recognition 
because we would like to see those 
from each of the 49 other states, 
who are working in behalf of the 
arts and gifted students, approach 
their legislatures to establish simi- 
lar schools for gifted children." 

The school, made possible by the 
1963 State Legislature, graduated 
its first class of 55 high school 
seniors on June 8. It had opened in 
September of 1965 with 215 stu- 
dents — 77 on the college level, 129 
in high school, and nine in junior 
high school. More than half of the 
graduating seniors will return this 
September as students in the col- 
lege program. Meanwhile, auditions 
have been conducted throughout 
this State and many others since 
last March for the hundreds of 
youngsters talented in the per- 
forming arts who applied for en- 
rollment for the 1966-67 year. 

The Legislature appropriated 
sums for start-up costs, salaries, 
and other expenses. Winston-Salem 
made available a high school plant 
and campus and the citizens of that 
city contributed $925,000 to build 
the first two dormitories and reno- 
vate the classroom buildings. Dr. 
Vittorio Giannini was named presi- 
dent and recruited a faculty which 
includes many artists and teach- 
ers of international reputation in 
music, the drama, and the dance. 

In February of this year the 
Ford Foundation announced a chal- 



lenge grant to the school of $1.5 
million which triggered a fund- 
raising campaign to raise $7 mil- 
lion. Governor Dan Moore has 
named John J. Ryan of Charlotte, 
vice president and general manager 
of the North Carolina operations 
of Southern Bell Telephone and 
Telegraph Co., to head a statewide 
fund-raising program. The school 
will receive $500,000 from Ford 
Foundation during 1966. This 
amount is to be matched on a dol- 
lar-for-dollar basis by the school. 
The following four years the foun- 
dation will give the school $250,000 
a year to be matched two-to-one. 

The gift and fund-raising cam- 
paign opens the way for important 
changes at the school. These in- 
clude a fully adequate physical 
plant for a student body of 500, 
which will double student housing 
and food service facilities ; a well- 
financed scholarship-aid program 
and an equally well-financed salary 
supplement program for the teach- 
ing staff; and the expansion and 
improvement of basic facilities as 
the library and student center. 



GOVERNOR'S SCHOOL 

The 1966 session of the 
Governor's School came to a 
close on August 6 with Sup- 
erintendent C. Douglas Carter 
declaring it "has been the 
smoothest of the four" held 
thus far. He attributed the 
smoother operation to the ex- 
perience of faculty and staff 
and also credited new mem- 
bers of the faculty with in- 
novations important to the ex- 
perimental character of the 
school. 

Four hundred junior and 
seniors from North Carolina 
high schools again attended 
the school held on the campus 
of Salem College in Winston- 
Salem. It was the first session 
financed entirely by the State 
in a program designed to de- 
velop better methods of edu- 
cation for gifted high school 
students. 



Latin Guide Incorporates 
New Instructional Ideas 

Latin teachers will find helpful 
suggestions on teaching methods, 
utilization of mechanical aids, test- 
ing, and course content in the new 
Latin Curriculum Guide (Publi- 
cation No. 396), issued by the State 
Department of Public Instruction. 

The attractively designed 34-page 
publication also includes extensive 
lists of books and periodicals, Latin 
study and activity materials, and 
audiovisual aids. 

It incorporates recommendations 
and information from a variety 
of sources, reflecting certain vari- 
ations from the traditional pattern 
of the study of Latin — modifi- 
cations in objectives, experiments 
with new teaching techniques and 
new educational media, and new 
thoughts on the inclusion in the 
high school curriculum of works 
by various classical authors. At the 
same time, it outlines the suggested 
content of a traditional four-year 
program. 

The new guide was developed 
by the North Carolina Latin Cur- 
ciculum Committee , headed by Mrs. 
Tora Tuve Ladu, supervisor of 
foreign languages, and James M. 
Dunlap, consultant in testing and 
pupil placement, State Department 
of Public Instruction. Two univer- 
sity faculty members and six high 
school Latin teachers served on 
the committee. 

Editorial assistance was provided 
by James E. Jackman, editorial 
consultant, and the layout design 
and illustrations were done by Mrs. 
Ann W. Gray, artist-draftsman, 
both of the State Department of 
Public Instruction staff. 



Principals Meet . . . 

Continued from page 1 

Dr. Joseph M. Johnston, director of 
the Department's Title I, ESEA, 
administration, spoke about the 
principal's relation to Federal pro- 
grams. 

The "what we are learning" 
phase of the programs was pre- 
sented by other Department staff 
members and brief excerpts of their 
messages are carried elsewhere 
under "Conference Gleanings." 



SEPTEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



IS 



LOOKING BACK 

In September issues of the 
North Carolina Public School Bulletin 

Five Years Ago, 1961 
Marvin R. A. Johnson, design 
consultant in the division of 
school planning in the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction, 
was presented a distinguished 
service citation by the North 
Carolina Chapter of the American 
Institute of Architects. . . . 



Ten Years Ago, 1956 
State funds in the total amount 
of $128,628,776 were approved for 
operation of the public schools 
during 1956-57 by the State Board 
of Education at a meeting held 
July 5. 



Fifteen Years Ago, 1951 
Director of Defense Mobili- 
zation Charles E. Wilson recently 
called attention to the Nation's 
"serious shortage of scientifically 
and technically trained person- 
nel. . . ." 

Schools in Federal impact areas, 
that is areas where the Federal 
Armed Services operate, will re- 
ceive more than two and a quarter 
million dollars in grants this year. 



Twenty Years Ago, 1946 
Schools in North Carolina will 
receive nearly half a million dol- 
lars for purchasing nonfood items 
in the operation of the School 
Lunch Program under the Na- 
tional School Lunch Act. 

Dr. Amos Abrams, Chairman of 
the Department of English at Ap- 
palachian State Teachers College, 
Boone, has been appointed to the 
staff of the North Carolina Edu- 
cation Association as Associate 
Editor of North Carolina Education 
and Director of Research. 



Twenty-five Years Ago, 1941 
The fifth annual North Carolina 
Conference of Superintendents 
met this year at Nags Head on 
July 31-August 2. 

America's Free Schools, recently 
published by the Council for De- 
mocracy, warns against the ef- 
forts of pressure groups to gain 
control of the schools and against 
economy drives which threaten 
the American school system which 
is "our stake in tomorrow." 



YOUR PUBLICATION 

Yes, this is the same publication, your North Carolina Public 
School Bulletin. We hope you like our new look — and we hope you 
will help us make your Bulletin a real "information" publication. 

Write us ! Share with us the new programs and developments in 
your school so we may inform the other schools about them. If you 
have good pictures which tell a story, we can use them. 

We also seek your cooperation in the distribution of the Bulletin. 
The administration office of each school system should be receiving 
enough copies for distribution to the superintendent, assistant su- 
perintendent (s), director of instruction board attorney, and all 
members of the board of education. Let us know if you are not re- 
ceiving enough copies. 

Copies for school principals and school libraries are being sent 
directly to each school. We have other mailing lists but those are 
the ones going to our schools. If there are others who would like 
to receive the Bulletin, send their names and addresses to the Pub- 
lication Section, State Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh 
27602— Almetta Cooke Brooks, Editor 



Equivalency Certificate Recipients Increase 

A total of 4,124 individuals took the test of General Educational De- 
velopment (GED) during the 1965-66 fiscal year with 3,190 being awarded 
the High School Equivalency Certificate by the State Department of 
Public Instruction — an increase of 630 over the number of certificates 
issued during 1964-65. 

A total of 1,016 persons awarded certificates were in the military 
service and 2,174 were civilians. Percentage of examinees awarded certifi- 
cates was 77.4 and the percentage of increase in individuals processed, 
over the previous fiscal year, was 28.2. 

Technology . . . Continued from page U 

"We as educators must be concerned with developing the whole range 
of human power — with making sure that our students don't grow up to 
be partial people, imperceptive and insensitive." 

After reading the poems and the Mark Twain passages, he commented: 
"Picture a kind of life in which this type of experience did not exist, 
and you'll see a miserable kind of life." Holmes' poem, he pointed out, 
"takes the academic question of learning — accumulating and marshalling 
facts — and turns it over to the human way of learning." Dame Sitwell's 
poem, contrasting the "fire of the heart" and the "fire of the mind", is 
itself a fusion of "heart" and "mind," which occurs in the "human way 
of learning." Mark Twain's seemingly ingenuous reminiscences about 
his experiences in learning to pilot a riverboat are not just "writing 
about" education ; they "evoke" education — "the discovery of the river is 
the discovery of what it means to be an educated person." 

Giannini . . . Continued from page h 

exceptionally talented students to the School of the Arts for possible 
acceptance on the basis of auditions and other selective procedures. Second, 
to provide the best possible education in the fine arts for students who 
do not show professional potential, and for those who do not even show 
initial interest in the arts. "The public schools have the role of preparing 
the audience of tomorrow," and the audience is just as important as the 
performer, he observed. 

"I think it is very important for the public schools to expose our young 
people to the best in all the arts," he commented, "because all of us — and 
this has been put in us by the Lord — react to the good things in life. If 
you never show people something better, obviously they can't react to it. 
But if you show them something better, they will eventually appreciate it, 
understand it, and for some mysterious reason, react to it." 



16 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



North Carolina State Library 



\5 NORTH CAROLINA 



Raifiiqh 




BULLETIN 



Carroll Testifies 
For Subcommittee 

North Carolina's method of 
adopting school basal and supple- 
mental textbooks drew praise from 
a subcommittee of the House Ed- 
ucation and Labor Committee in- 
vestigating charges that school 
texts are not adequate in their 
treatment of racial minorities. 

State Superintendent of School 
Charles F. Carroll explained the 
procedure used by the State Text- 
book Commission at a hearing in 
Washington on August 30. In re- 
porting on the hearing to the State 
Board of Education, Dr. Carroll 
said some 30 minutes were con- 
sumed in discussing textbooks after 
which the subcommittee moved to 
questions about Federal desegrega- 
tion guidelines, keeping him on the 
witness stand for another hour. 

With regard to textbooks, Dr. 
Carroll said this State's policy is 
to choose books that are "factually, 
accurate, and without tinges of 
propaganda, artificiality, and dis- 
tortions of fact." He added that the 
State and its county and city school 
units "do not think in terms of 
minority or majority groups." 
Good Books 

"There are available to county 
and city boards of education multi- 
ethnic books not so much because 
of consideration of the multi-ethnic 
or intercultural aspect as because 
the books are good books," Dr. Car- 
roll told the committee. "As in all 
other areas of school operation, 
North Carolina school authorities 
in the selection and adoption and 
use of books will continue to para- 
mount excellence and cast aside 
everything else." 

The hour-long discussion of de- 
segregation guidelines was one of 
the few times the subject has been 
aired in a congressional committee. 
Dr. Carroll charged that USOE 
compliance teams, which have been 
visiting school districts throughout 
the State, are overstepping their 

(Continued on page 6) 




Vol. XXXI, No. 2 



October, 1966 



Suit Filed By Cosmetologists Could Threaten 
Additional High School Vocational Education 

A temporary restraining order, which had prevented cosmetic arts 
classes from opening this fall in six high schools in the State, was dis- 
solved September 7 after a hearing in Randolph County Superior Court. 

Judge Walter E. Johnston, Jr. allowed the classes, involving some 240 
students, to convene but did not issue a final ruling in the action brought 
by private beauty school owners seeking to bar cosmetology courses 
permanently from the public schools. The case is to be heard, on a date 
as yet undetermined, in Cabarrus County Superior Court. 

The suit, brought by Elizabeth Hassen and Kay Richter of the Con- 
cord Beauty School, names as defendants the State Board of Educa- 
tion and the Cabarrus County Board of Education. In its petition the 
beauty school contends establishment of cosmetology courses in the 
State's high schools is an invasion of a field covered by private enter- 
prise and that it would destroy private business. It also claims that 
the result will ultimately be a taking of property without due process 
of law. 

The State Board of Education has affirmed its support of high school 
beauty courses. State Superintendent Charles F. Carroll has warned that 
the question includes the whole range of vocational education classes 
which competes with private teaching — such as business and office oc- 
cupations and driver training. 

Proof of Need 

Vocational education funds are allotted by the State Board of Educa- 
tion to county and city boards of education, industrial education cen- 
ters, technical institutes, and community colleges. Allotment is made on 
the basis of request from local authorities, supported by evidence that 
a definite need exists, the service will be of public value, and that the 
local community is willing to help defray the total cost. Teacher 
salaries, based on certificate rating, are paid 75 percent from Federal 
and State funds; 25 percent local; equipment, 50 percent Federal and 
State, 50 percent local; supplies, 100 percent local; and building facili- 
ties and services, 100 percent local. 

"Obviously the extension and expansion of vocational or any other 
type of education is likely to run afoul of private educational opera- 
tions," Dr. Carroll said. "Personally, I recommend cosmetology be of- 
fered in public high schools. For me to take any other position would 
be in violation of the commitment that I made as a member of President 
Kennedy's Panel of Consultants. I am confident that vocational educa- 
tion of this nature will help prevent many girls from dropping out of 
school. It is most essential that more of our girls obtain at least high 
school graduation." 

Dr. Carroll was referring to President Kennedy's Panel of Consul- 
tants on Vocational-Technical Education assigned to study "The 
World of Work" in which 87 million people in the nation are to be 
engaged within this decade. He was a member of the 25-member panel. 
For 14 months the group gave special attention to vocational educa- 
tion for girls and women. 

Other than home economics, the study revealed there was little voca- 
tional education for girls and women. It recommended that more con- 
sideration be given this group, urging the expansion of such programs 
as business and office occupations, nursing, commercial and industrial 
food preparation and catering, and cosmetology. 

(Continued on page 13) 



■iDUCATlOrSAL 
fflsSOCI A TION 

■*3!S?america 

NORTH CAROLINA 
PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 

Official publication issued monthly except 
June, July and August by the State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, Education Building, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27602. Second-class 
postage paid at Raleigh, N. C. 27602. 

CHARLES F. CARROLL 
State Supt. of Public Instruction 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

J. E. MILLER, ALMETTA C. BROOKS, 

V. M. MULHOLLAND, J. E. JACKMAN 



OCTOBER, 1966 



VOL. XXXI, NO. 2 



In today's educational world and 
with so much emphasis being placed 
on what we see as direct federal 
interference in the running of our 
schools, ... we must not lose sight 
of one very important factor. . . . 
The school forces must seek out the 
best and most able teachers it is 
possible to hire. Anything less than 
the best we can hire leaves much 
to be desired. . . . The quality of 
teaching is a far more important 
factor in the search for better edu- 
cational opportunities than a lot of 
people realize. It is too important 
to take lightly and to solve auto- 
matically. — Editorial, Washington 
Daily News. 



We aren't smarter than we are 
because we haven't learned to read 
or to listen at a mature level. Many 
adults have not mastered the art of 
flexibility in reading, learned when 
to skim lightly and when to dig 
deeply. — Edgar Dale, American 
School News. 



The superintendency implies the 
role of leadership, and part of its 
function is to take responsibility 
both for the quality of instruction 
and for the relevance of the schools 
to the social issues of the day. 
School administrators often feel 
harassed by such demands ; yet the 
demands have a positive side: they 
are increasing evidence of the 
seriousness of the public concern 
for education and of public realiza- 
tion that education is related to the 
total problems of the community. — 
Francis Keppel, The Necessary 
Revolution in American Education. 



Superintendent Carroll Says . . . 

(Additional excerpts from address at the Superintendents Conference, July 27, 1966) 
. . . Regarding the utilization of personnel, I feel we should take a new 
look at the assistant superintendency. In the full expectation that many 
of you will disagree with me, I would like to place myself on record 
as declaring that in my opinion the first assistant superintendent em- 
ployed in any given administrative unit should be in the field of fiscal 
management, the sine qua non of any and every operation. This, in my 
opinion, is the most appropriate way to release the largest number of 
superintendents for educational leadership. I would record myself fur- 
ther with the declaration that I think the second assistant superinten- 
dent employed might be the director and coordinator of instruction. I 
feel further that the requirements of the New Day warrant the em- 
ployment of an assistant superintendent for personnel and one for in- 
service education. Most obviously, I am indicating here further reasons 
as to why I feel small school administrative units simply cannot endure. 

In the immediate area of instruction itself, I do not believe we can 
achieve maximally until every superintendent and board of education 
in North Carolina resolves to help get teachers into the field for which 
they have received their preparation. . . .Quick change cannot come 
about in this instance because over the years teacher supply has been 
disproportionate to teacher demand, but we can move more positively 
along this line through in-service education. . . . 

Having referred to textbooks, I would express a concern about the 
subject. As a new way in North Carolina of effecting improvement in 
the learning process, many of you have told us that you need co-basal 
textbooks — books written for differing types of learners. In response to 
this request we have provided books written for pupils with differing 
abilities. There is no mandate whatsoever that anybody use one of 
these books instead of the other. I am tremendously concerned, however, 
and some of my associates are tremendously concerned, over the possi- 
bility that the provision for permitting choice of co-basal textbooks 
might be misused or even abused. The very best judgment must attend 
both the choice and the use of co-basal texts. 

And if we are going to meet the demands of the day, it is essential that 
we move more positively and intelligently into the area of pre-school 
education just as we have moved into post-high school education. I 
told the General Assembly in 1965 that in my opinion there is no greater 
fallacy than to say that all children entering school at the age of six 
are on par one with the other. They do not have an equal chance be- 
cause of the deficiencies with which many of them come to us. 

Thus, recruitment, training, and utilization of personnel is illustra- 
tive of the many opportunities which should be subjected to thoughtful 
planning and assessment. The reorganization of schools and instruction 
within schools is awaiting its turn at the planning table. The consolida- 
tion of schools and the merger of weak and ineffective administrative 
units are matters which cannot be postponed if educational jurisdic- 
tions are to keep pace with governmental jurisdictions. The intelligent 
use of all variety of textbooks, supplemented by the mammoth array 
of instructional hardware necessitates thoughtful analysis and evalua- 
tion. The expansion and extension of programs of education, including 
preschool education are urgently in need of evaluation and refinement. 

The frightening yet challenging reality about these new ways of 
educating people in these New Days is that these programs and services 
are already on the horizon. Surely as the sun moves through the heavens 
they will come to pass. The question is: Who shall bring them to pass? 
The answer is: Those who have the ability to organize their staffs to 
effectively plan, project, evaluate, train, and direct. In this New Day 
I express the hope that you and those like you will not allow this golden 
opportunity to slip from your hands through default. I express the hope 
and confidence you will be Pioneers in New Ways in these New Days! 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Our Money Buys? Emphasis: The Individual 



A national study several years 
ago entitled, "What Education Our 
Money Buys," concluded with the 
observation that individual schools 
and school systems in which the 
largest amounts of money were in- 
vested had, almost without excep- 
tion, the most effective programs 
of education. Certainly, this is 
what educators and other tax- 
payers would desire ! 

And, today, with funds abundant 
for so many educational programs, 
all citizens have a right and an ob- 
ligation to expect better educational 
programs. In 1958-59, North Caro- 
lina, with its $220 expenditure per 
pupil in average daily attendance, 
as compared to the national average 
of $340 per pupil, ranked forty- 
third among the states. For 1965- 
66, it is estimated that the current 
expenditure per pupil was $379 as 
compared to the national average of 
$533. This figure also places North 
Carolina, as in 1958-59, seventh 
from the bottom among the states. 

Last year North Carolina's ex- 
penditure on public school educa- 
tion was at least $120,000,000 more 
than eight years ago. More than 
$50,000,000 of this amount was 
spent in 1965-66 through funds 
from the Elementary and Second- 
ary Education Act. 

The insistent and pertinent ques- 
tion which must be raised by educa- 
tors and other taxpayers is this: 
To what degree and in what ways 
is education in North Carolina to- 
day 41 percent better than it was 
eight years ago? Is the instruc- 
tional program 41 percent better? 
Are guidance services 41 percent 
better? Attendance counseling? Or- 
ganization? Administration? Su- 
pervision? Evaluation? School- 
community relationships? Quality 
of the teachers themselves ? 

Is North Carolina, with its rank 
of forty-third in the Nation in this 
particular category, really standing 
still? To what degree are figures 
misleading? How much of this per- 
centage increase can justifiably be 
labelled cost-of-living increase? 

Is it possible in 1966-67 for 
ESEA projects to reflect more re- 
finement than a year ago? Can 
NDEA funds be more wisely used 



The individual approach to instruction is more widely embraced in 
the public schools than ever before. Many of those who were skeptical, 
uncertain, and timid in their efforts to implement this concept a few 
years ago are now its most enthusiastic proponents! Individual goal- 
setting is perhaps the key to the success of this particular approach, an 
approach which can become a reality in many schools throughout the 
State. 

The desire for individual excellence on the part of parents, teachers, 
and students themselves; the demands of business, industry, and insti- 
tutions of higher learning for individual superiority; plus the fact of 
increasing desegregation of classes throughout the State have caused all 
those concerned with the education of youth to re-examine more cri- 
tically than heretofore the possibilities inherent in the individual ap- 
proach to excellence in attainment. This critical examination, often 
accompanied by objective self-analysis and serious study of research 
findings, has caused many administrators and teachers to be willing to 
experiment with a number of approaches to personal excellence among 
all students. 

Encouraging developments in recent years which seem to indicate a 
growing tendency toward the individualization of instruction include — 

• wiser use of test results — I. Q., diagnostic, achievement, aptitude, 

personality 

• improved teacher-student planning with particular emphasis on 

personal motivation 

• more effective use of individual and group evaluation as a teaching- 

learning experience 

• effective emphasis on small group work within the class 

• flexibility in scheduling and in use of school time so that individual 

students have opportunities to work alone — under teacher super- 
vision — sufficiently often that habits of self-reliance, independ- 
ence, and persistence may be stressed 

• the adoption of dual-basal textbooks in certain areas 

• the increasing availability of supplmentary teaching and learning 

materials in the classroom which are appropriate for all levels of 
attainment 

• improved preparation of teachers with considerable emphasis on 

developing a knowledge of the individual — the manner in which 
he grows, learns, and develops as a total organism 

• improved emphasis on pertinent in-service experiences, many of 

which include emphasis on the individualized approach to learning 

• the planning of school facilities — libraries, classrooms, laboratories 

— in terms of working more and more with individuals 

• growing awareness of the necessity for differentiation in goals, 

teaching techniques, assignments, and the like if individuals are 
to reach their potentialities 

The need for citizens who can function in a changing society demands 
that education be focused more and more on individual students. Ac- 
ceptance of this premise demands, in turn, that those responsible for 
education must focus their attention on making many other changes 
compatible with what is well documented concerning motivation, and 
ways in which learning best takes place. 

Students learn as individuals and this fact must increasingly per- 
meate the thinking and planning of those responsible for goal-setting, 
for teaching, and for evaluation. — V.M.H. 



in certain quarters for the improve- 
ment of instruction? Will permis- 
sion to use part-time teachers next 
year result in better education for 
our money? Will teacher aides? 



Assistant superintendents? Spe- 
cially allotted teachers? Dual-basal 
textbook adoptions in certain 
areas? Language laboratories? In- 
creased salaries? — V.M.H. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Majority of Title I Projects Stress Communication Skills 



By Dr. J. M. Johnston, Director 
State Administration, Title I, ESEA 

Last October the State Board of Education signed 
an agreement with the United States Office of Ed- 
ucation to administer Title I of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965 and thereby made 
available to North Carolina a Federal grant of 
$52,826,063.14 for fiscal 1966. 

In accordance with Public Law 89-10 and the 
guidelines issued by the Office of Education, 168 
school administrative units in North Carolina sub- 
mitted to the State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion projects for the school year 1965-66. These proj- 
ects were examined by members of the staff of the 
State Department and were approved for implemen- 
tation by the local units if the projects were educa- 
tionally sound, met the most pressing educational 
needs of the educationally deprived children in the 
project area, and could be coordinated with existing 
educational programs. 

Most administrative units found that improvement 
in reading and the communication skills was the 
most pressing educational need of the educationally 
deprived child. In fact, of the 183 projects which 
were approved last year, 102 were designed to im- 
prove the language arts, 23 to improve reading, and 
42 to improve all the basic skills. The balance were 
concerned with such areas as expanding vocational 
education, working with dropouts, and emphasizing 
social studies for citizenship improvement. 

The educationally deprived child usually comes 
from a social environment where there is little value 
placed on education. His background is void of cul- 
tural experiences and his communication skills are 
so undeveloped that he is not able to respond to 
conventional methods and materials in the classroom. 
So, while the main thrust of the projects might be 
aimed at improvement in the basic communication 
skills, there were included countless "back-up" pro- 
grams designed to enlarge the child's concept of the 
world and society, eliminate physical causes for his 
failure, and stimulate his curiosity, enthusiasm and 
self-confidence. 

Back-up Proposals 

It was in these "back-up" proposals that the most 
interesting aspects of the program were found. There 
was ample evidence that teachers and administrators 
working on Title I projects were quite aware of the 
problems of the educationally deprived children and 
were quite willing to tackle these problems with 
enthusiasm and inventiveness. 

In one rural county piano lessons were provided 
for the many children who wished them. A Wurlitzer 
Electronic Communication Center and twelve elec- 
tronic pianos were placed in one school, enabling 
300 children to have five lessons a week, and en- 
abling each student to progress at whatever speed 
his own aptitude would permit. Silent practice alone, 
or heard only by the teacher, helped hesitant stu- 
dents to build confidence. 

In another county readable literature of a good 



quality was purchased to be left in homes which 
often had no printed matter. Also, plans were made 
to have home visiting parties in some of the most 
indigent or deprived homes, to promote a type of 
adult education. 

One of the city systems experimented with a class 
composed of children who had been "trouble makers" 
in their regular classrooms and sent a taxi for each 
student to make him feel more important in his own 
eyes and in his neighborhood. 

Out-of-town Trips 

Among the many plans for cultural enrichment 
through travel, there was one which limited the 
number of children who were involved but extended 
the scope of the trips they took. Each of the ele- 
mentary schools in the system selected three chil- 
dren of the 5th and 6th grade levels because the 
size of the bus limited to 33 the number of children 
who could participate. Two out-of-town trips were 
taken each week of the six-week ESEA summer pro- 
gram. The trips were scheduled on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays and the other three days were set aside 
for advance preparation and for study of the pre- 
vious day's excursion. Crammed into the program 
was almost every aspect of public education: history, 
geography, economics, music, science, art. The chil- 
dren examined maps to determine their itinerary; 
studied the background of historical points visited; 
drew murals and pictures of the places seen. 

Because many school problems begin in the home 
or on the way to school, one system employed case 
workers and counselors to ride school buses serving 
schools of impoverished children. The ladies were 
selected from the areas in which the deprived chil- 
dren lived and each was to deal with the children 
and the families of her assigned bus. By coopera- 
tion of the County Industrial Education Center, 
North Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles, Red 
Cross and the County Health and Welfare Depart- 
ments there ladies were instructed in Red Cross 
Basic First-Aid, Driver Safety, Health Problems and 
Social and Welfare Problems. The bus counselors 
were also assigned to in-school duties commensurate 
with their qualifications and as the program pro- 
gressed and additional talents became known or 
developed, they were assigned additional duties. 
Other Services 

Additional food services, diagnostic and remedial 
health services, attendance counseling, home visits 
by trained individuals, and counseling and psychiat- 
ric services are other areas included in many proj- 
ects. 

One of the definite requirements for the approval 
of a Title I project was that it include specific 
methods for evaluating the activities. This evalua- 
tion is being conducted by school administrative 
units at the present time, and the information se- 
cured by such evaluations should enable each unit 
to improve future projects so they will meet even 
more effectively the particular educational needs 
of the children for whom projects under Title I are 
designed. 



NORTH CAROLINA PUBLIC SCHOOL BULLETIN 



Introducing More Staffers in the State Education Agency 



This month it is our pleasure to introduce new 
professional staffers who have joined the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction since August 1. 

Ronald J. Ausdenmoore is a psychologist with 
the Special Education Section of the Division of 
Instructional Services. He is a native of Cincinnati, 
Ohio; for the past three years has been psychologist 
for the Cincinnati Public Schools; and he also taught 
part-time during the past two years at Xavier Uni- 
versity in that city. He holds the B.S. degree from 
the University of Cincinnati and he took his M.A. 
and did an internship in clinical psychology at 
Xavier University. He is married and has four young 
children. 

Mrs. Vergie F. Cox, as associate supervisor of 
School Libraries in the Educational Media Section, 
will work with school systems throughout the State 
in the area of school libraries and instructional ma- 
terials services. She comes to the Department from 
the Jefferson Elementary School where she served 
as librarian, audiovisual coordinator, and school co- 
ordinator for federal programs. She holds the bache- 
lor and graduate degrees from Appalachian State 
Teachers College and, in addition, has done extensive 
postgraduate work in the fields of library science 
and audiovisual education. 

Mrs. Judith Elaine Garitano also is in the Educa- 
tional Media Section as associate supervisor of 
Federal Programs. She will assist in the supervision 
of ESEA Title II program activities and will have 
specific responsibility for NDEA Title III instruc- 
tional materials services. She comes from the North 
Carolina Advancement School where she served as 
librarian and helped conduct short and long-term 
institutes and workshops sponsored by the Learning 
Institute of North Carolina. She holds the B.S. de- 
gree from Wake Forest College and has an M.S. in 
Library Science from the University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill. 

James W. Jenkins for the past three years has 
been superintendent of Southern Pines Public 
Schools. He will head a new field in the Depart- 
ment as supervisor of Early Childhood Education. 
The post is concerned with the policies, philosophy, 
and procedures of establishing state-supported 
kindergartens, and supervising both public and non- 
public early childhood programs. He will serve as 
liaison between colleges and universities and di- 
visions in the Department and with groups across 
the State interested in preschool education. 

Jenkins is a native of Shelby and a graduate of 
Western Carolina College. He took his master's de- 
gree at Appalachian and has done postgraduate work 
at UNC-CH. He and Mrs. Jenkins have two children, 
a son, aged 10; and a daughter, six. 

David L. Lillie is a consultant in Mental Retarda- 
tion for the Special Education Section. He is a na- 
tive of Allegan, near Kalamazoo, where he had been 



serving as school psychologist for the county schools 
prior to joining the Department. His prior educa- 
tional experience has been in teaching the educable 
mentally retarded. He took both his undergraduate 
and M.A. degrees in psychology from Western Michi- 
gan University. He also holds the Ed.D. from Indiana 
University. He and Mrs. Lillie have two daughters, 
aged seven and five, and a son, 19 months. 

J. Edd McBride, consultant in math and science 
for the Exceptionally Talented Section, is single — 
but, we are told, he "has plans." He has been teach- 
ing for six years, coming to the Department from 
the Davie County Schools. McBride holds the B.S. 
degree from N. C. State University, the M.A. from 
UNC-CH, and he has done post-graduate work at 
UNC-Greensboro and at Appalachian. 

Robert A. Mullen, until recently a member of the 
N. C. State University faculty involved in teacher 
training in Industrial Education, has been named 
associate director of the Division of Vocational Ed- 
ucation. Previously he had served as associate direc- 
tor of W. W. Holding Industrial Education Center, 
had taught at Burlington Industrial Education Cen- 
ter and at N. C. State University, and had been in 
charge of training programs for private industry. 
He is a native of Winston-Salem; holds the B.S. and 
M.S. degrees from N. C. State and is continuing 
graduate work there. He and Mrs. Mullen have one 
son, aged two and one-half. 

E. Matthew Prescott is assistant supervisor of 
Distributive Education for the Division of Voca- 
tional Education. He is a native of Pamlico County 
and came to the Department from New Bern where 
he served as coordinator of Distributive Education. 
He also has teaching experience in Business Educa- 
tion. He and Mrs. Prescott have three daughters, 
aged four, seven, and nine years. 

Ben D. Quinn is educational consultant in the Di- 
vision of School Planning and came to the Depart- 
ment from Onslow County Schools where he served 
as assistant superintendent. He had previously been 
superintendent of Hyde County Schools and a teacher 
and assistant principal in Onslow County. He holds 
the B.S. degree from Appalachian and the M.A. from 
Eastern Carolina College. He is married and has two 
sons, aged four and one. 

Roger I. Woodbury is consultant in Language Arts 
for the Exceptionally Talented Section. He is a na- 
tive of New York City but has lived in North Caro- 
lina for a number of years. He came to the Depart- 
ment from Siler City where he served as counselor 
in the Jordan Matthews Schools. He also has six 
years' teaching experience. Woodbury took his B.S. 
degree from Eastern Carolina, his M.A. from Colum- 
bia University, and his M.S. in counseling and psy- 
chology from N. C. State University. He and Mrs. 
Woodbury have two daughters aged two and one- 
half and one month. 



OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SIX 



Part-Time Teachers 
Approved By Board 

The State Board of Education on 
September 1 authorized schools to 
hire two or more part-time teachers 
to fill one teaching position allotted 
under the State Nine Months School 
Fund. 

The action was recommended by 
State Superintendent Charles F. 
Carroll as an emergency measure 
during the current teacher short- 
age. However, Dr. Carroll said he 
thinks the change is a good one as 
a general practice. 

Part-time teachers are to be paid 
on a percentage basis — with base 
pay determined by the certificate 
and experience. 

The Board also adopted a policy 
exempting teachers from non-Eng- 
lish speaking countries from the 
requirement of taking the National 
Teacher Examination for a period 
"not exceeding three school years" 
from the time they begin teaching 
in the State. Dr. Carroll reported 
that around 20 such teachers, 
chiefly from Latin America, are 
currently teaching in the public 
schools of the State. "These people 
make a fine contribution in lan- 
guages," he said, in recommending 
they be given three years to pass 
the teachers' examination. 

Dr. Carroll reported that some 
retired teachers have returned to 
the school room to help fill vacant 
positions. Meanwhile, "Education 
U. S. A.," a weekly report on ed- 
ucational affairs published by the 
National School Public Relations 
Association, reported on September 
1 that the teacher shortage is na- 
tion wide and quoted some of Dr. 
Carroll's suggested short-term solu- 
tions such as the use of part-time 
personnel. 

Ohio was expected to open schools 
with 2,000 vacancies; Missouri of- 
ficials reported that State's short- 
age of 1,600 teachers the worst in 
its history. However, New York 
City expected to be fully staffed, 
having signed up 2,000 teachers 
from a special summer training 
program for liberal arts graduates 
who lacked education credits and 
having added 4,000 teachers 
through a stepped-up recruitment 
program, including surveys in the 
South. 



New Programs Developed in Schools Featured 
On Public School Report, Weekly Radio Show 



A series of 15-minute radio pro- 
grams is attempting to interpret a 
number of the new educational pro- 
grams being developed in the public 
schools of the State and to give gen- 
eral information about the schools 
to the public. 

The Publications Section of the 
State Department of Public In- 
struction developed the programs, 
with the assistance of experienced 
staff members who work directly 
with the schools. They have been 
taped by the Department's Audio- 
visual Education Section. 
Sunday Broadcasts 

The TN Radio News Network is 
airing the programs each Sunday 
at 9:30 a.m. and offering them 
without charge to any other inter- 
ested radio stations in the State. 
Signals may be received from 
WRAL-FM, Raleigh; WAIR-FM, 
Winston-Salem ; and W F M X, 
Statesville. Stations unable to re- 
ceive the signals may request the 
programs on tape. Some stations 
are rebroadcasting the programs 
immediately, others are taping 
them for future use. 

The programs are entitled "Pub- 
lic School Report." State Superin- 
tendent Charles F. Carroll and As- 
sistant State Superintendent J. E. 
Miller opened the series on Septem- 
ber 18 with a discussion of ques- 
tions most frequently asked about 
the public schools. The second pro- 
gram heard Morris C. Brown, the 
Department's supervisor of Teacher 
Recruitment, Scholarship and Place- 
ment, and Stan C. Broadway, 
secretary of the State Education 
Assistance Authority, explain how 
and where high school students may 
seek financial aid for post-high 
school education. 

CSIP Discussed 

Dr. Woodrow Sugg, director of 
the Comprehensive School Improve- 
ment Project, and K. Z. Chavis and 
Dr. Frank C. Emmerling, assistant 
directors, discuss the project and 
promising new teaching and learn- 
ing methods it is revealing. The 
fourth program has Nile F. Hunt, 
director of Instructional Services, 
and Dr. Paul A. Peeples, consultant 
in Special Education, discussing 
outstanding programs in the State 
in the Special Education field. The 



fifth program in the series sees 
Robert Lassiter and Claude Myer 
explaining the work of the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation with 
emphasis on new high school pro- 
grams. 

On October 23, Dr. Eugene Bur- 
nette and Roger Woodbury of the 
Department will discuss education 
for the exceptionally talented to 
be followed the next week with 
a program on vocational education 
by A. G. Bullard and Robert A. 
Mullen of the Department. 

Future topics to be discussed in- 
clude programs developed under the 
National Defense Education Act; 
outstanding ESEA, Title I, proj- 
ects ; the new look and services in 
school libraries ; and audiovisual 
education. 

Public school personnel are urged 
to check with the radio stations in 
their home communities to see if 
the programs are being carried 
and, if so, when. 



Carroll Testifies . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

authority as set by Congress and 
the courts. 

Dr. Carroll told the subcommittee 
that North Carolina is "positively, 
eternally, and irrevocab